first_imgLatest Stories Leverette to play lead in ‘Mamma Mia!’ “I’m more excited than anything,” Leverette said. “I love what I’m doing and I’m looking forward to putting our work out there and let people see it. If I do get nervous, I’ll take a deep breath and pray.”Leverette is no stranger to the stage. She had the leading kids’ role in “Come Home, It’s Suppertime” at the We Piddle Around Theater in Brundidge from age 8 through 12.And she had several leading roles in theater productions at Charles Henderson High School, including Millie in “Thoroughly  Modern Millie,” Laura in “Band Geeks’ and Sally in “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” One might think Nelsey Leverette would be rather nervous when the curtain opens on Troy University’s production of  “Mamma Mia!” Friday night at the Claudia Crosby Theater.After all, Leverette plays Sophie Sheridan, the lead role in the ninth longest-running Broadway show and the longest-running jukebox musical in Broadway history. And, it’s the first student leading role she has played in her first year at the university.But no. Leverette said she is not nervous at all. Email the author The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBest 13 Fortnite Skins That You NeedTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel You Might Like Troy PEO to host fashion show to raise funds for women’s education By Marion Givhan Troy’s chapter of PEO International will host a fashion show to serve as a fundraiser for PEO’s… read more By The Penny Hoarder And that’s when the fun and frolic begin.The presentation involves 37 student performers, five faculty members and two alumni in the cast, along with a combination of 55 students, faculty and alumni in backstage, production or orchestral roles.“I think people of all ages will enjoy ‘Mamma Mia!’,” said Tori Lee Averett, chair of the Troy University Department of Theater  and Dance. “The nostalgic music of ABBA is a fun bit of retro reminiscence. The set, costumes and lighting display the exciting and romantic setting of the Greek island escape combined with a rock concert environment, the energy of the performers is absolutely contagious, and the story has universal appeal.”Lee-Averett said “Mamma Mia!” is an excellent representation; of the exemplary and fine and performing arts at Troy University, along with the strength of the collaboration between all the different areas that come together to make a show.“I truly believe we are a hidden gem –  big city caliber show right here in Troy.Show times are 7p.m. Friday, April 19 and 2:30 and 7 p.m. Saturday. April 20. Tickets are $10 and $5 for students with an ID and are available at the Trojan Center box office and can be purchased at http://troytheater.org.center_img Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Print Article Sponsored Content By Jaine Treadwell Leverette relishes all of those experiences but cannot hide her enthusiasm for the role of Sophie on the big stage at the 700-seat Claudia Crosby Theater on the campus of Troy University April 19 and 20.“The storyline is wonderful and lots of fun with singing and dancing,” Leverette said. “‘Mamma Mia!’ is such a great, fun story. It takes place on a Greek Island where Sophie is getting married. She wants her dad to walk her down the aisle but she doesn’t know who he is.”In an attempt to find the identity of her dad, Leverette said Sophie slips her mother’s diary and finds three entries that give her clues.“She decides that Sam, Bill and Harry could all possibly be her dad,” Leverette said. “She is sure she will  know which is her dad when she sees them.” Published 11:15 pm Thursday, April 11, 2019 Book Nook to reopen Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Daylast_img read more

first_imgMark Makela/Getty Images(NORRISTOWN, Pa.) — After years of innuendo, allegations and ultimately two criminal trials — the second of which ended with a guilty verdict Thursday — Bill Cosby has been convicted on felony sexual assault charges.The actor and entertainer — known as “America’s Dad” during the 1980s and beyond — will be sentenced to go to prison later this year.Here’s how prosecutors from Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, finally did it:The prosecution team of District Attorney Kevin Steele and assistant district attorneys Kristen Feden and Stewart Ryan appear to have benefited from at least three key factors in which the first trial differed from the retrial.Five additional accusers were allowed to testify in the retrial, versus one additional accuser in the first –- allowing the Commonwealth to demonstrate far more clearly what it has described as a decades-long pattern of alleged abuse by the defendant.Prosecutors’ savvy use of an effective sexual assault expert as its first witness set the stage for the succession of claims that six women gave on the witness stand about being drugged and molested by Cosby.The testimony of Dr. Barbara Ziv also seems to have helped inoculate those accounts from relentless attempts by the defense to discredit the women –- for coming forward years after the alleged incidents, for having sometimes hazy memories of the alleged attacks themselves, and for minor and major inconsistencies in their stories.The retrial unfolded in the looming shadow of the #MeToo movement, a powerful and ubiquitous phrase that was virtually unknown during Cosby’s first trial.Between the first hung jury and the start of the retrial, some of the biggest and most respected male stars in Hollywood, media and the arts were felled when multiple accusations of sexual harassment and assault drove them from their lofty perches into a new and devastating kind of public disgrace.Finally, the prosecution appears to have benefitted from a gross miscalculation by the defense, which took a ferocious approach to impeaching both the women who testified and the #MeToo movement as a whole.“The Most Important Ruling”Prosecutors won a major pre-trial victory in March when Judge Steven T. O’Neill, who also oversaw the first case, ruled that five additional women with similar accounts to Andrea Constand — that they were drugged and molested by Cosby — could testify. In the first trial, he only allowed one additional accuser to testify.Normally, prosecutors cannot introduce evidence of prior bad conduct from other cases because it could be prejudicial in the eyes of the jury. But Pennsylvania law allows for exceptions if such evidence establishes a modus operandi or common scheme to each alleged assault.Prosecutors argued the need to demonstrate to the jury a specific pattern of behavior they believe underscores the similarities between nearly all of the dozens of accusers they interviewed and the account of Constand.O’Neill had to weigh the value to the jury of hearing additional evidence from other accusers with similar stories against the prejudicial effect the new witnesses could have on the defendant.Legal experts described O’Neill’s decision as a game-changer.“It was the most important ruling in the first trial, and … the most important ruling in the second trial,” Steve Fairlie, a former Montgomery County prosecutor, told ABC News.In another new strategy employed in the retrial, prosecutors called as their first witness Dr. Barbara Ziv, an expert in sexual assault who outlined for jurors how the majority of sexual assault victims in the U.S. tend to display counter-intuitive behavior to other types of crime victims. It can be confused by observers and prompt them to doubt the victims’ stories, she said.Ziv testified that the majority of victims in the U.S. fail to make timely reports, are often fuzzy on details and facts, often do not fight back, and are known to maintain contact with their attackers after the assault.“Most of what people believe, the most common knowledge, about sexual assault is wrong,” she testified earlier this month.Women don’t tend to report such attacks, she said, because “there’s shame involved, there’s a sense of culpability,” Ziv said from the stand. “It’s talking about the most private areas of their life. Women do not talk about sex, consensual sex, very often to very many people.”That testimony appears to have inoculated jurors against defense attacks on the credibility of the additional five accusers.Recognizing this, defense attorneys in closing arguments took #MeToo head-on in a blistering attack on both the movement, the additional accusers and Dr. Ziv. They banked on a backlash to the #MeToo movement against the abuse and sexual harassment of women, describing it as a mob mentality “based primarily on emotion and anger.”“When you join a movement based primarily on emotion and anger, you don’t change a damn thing,” defense attorney Kathleen Bliss told jurors.And one by one they took aim at the five additional accusers, especially former model Janice Dickinson, whom Bliss described as a “failed starlet” and an “aged-out model” and mused that it sounded “like she slept with every man on the planet.”The Night Of…One of the most striking and overlooked aspects of both trials is not what divided the prosecution’s and defense attorneys’ arguments, but rather the facts upon which they agreed.Both sides stipulated that on a night sometime in or around early 2004, Constand visited Cosby at his suburban Philadelphia estate, that Cosby handed her three pills he referred to as “friends,” and that Constand ingested them.Both sides agreed that Constand grew dizzy, uncomfortable and sleepy, and that Cosby led her to a couch and laid her down.They also agreed that Cosby penetrated her with his fingers and used her hand to masturbate himself, and that afterward he left her on the couch and went upstairs to bed.From there, the two sides diverge sharply.Cosby’s attorneys described the incident as part of a consensual, if unorthodox, romantic relationship.Prosecutors said the entertainer viciously drugged and incapacitated Constand before raping her and leaving her passed out on the couch with her bra around her neck and her clothes disheveled before heading upstairs to bed.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

first_imgVLF signals in the 2–4 kHz range transmitted from Siple Station, Antarctica (L ∼ 4.3), and received at various Antarctic locations have been used to detect the occurrence of burst precipitation of electrons (E ≥ 50 keV) into the nighttime lower ionosphere. The receiving stations, each ∼1400 km from Siple, were located to the north at Palmer (L ∼ 2.3), to the east at Halley (L ∼ 4.3), and to the south at South Pole (Λ ∼ 74°). Rapid changes in the received phase and amplitude of the Siple signal (“Trimpi events”) were observed in conjunction with the reception of one‐hop whistlers. In one case involving propagation paths lying poleward of the plasmapause, amplitude decreases by ∼20% in ∼2 s, decaying in ∼7 s, were recorded simultaneously at Halley and South Pole. Post facto analysis of the South Pole records using a new digital processing scheme showed corresponding fast phase advances of ∼15 µs. In a case of phase perturbations at Palmer, the Siple signal path crossed the plasmapause projection, and the associated whistlers propagated in the outer plasmasphere. Phase measurements appear to be a particularly sensitive means of detecting burst precipitation activity under experimental conditions of the kind described. The length and spatial distribution of the signal paths provide a basis for studying the occurrence and approximate location of burst precipitation in regions outside the observing range of most instruments used for detection of precipitation. Direction finding on correlated whistler events as well as dispersion analysis may be used to increase the spatial resolution of the method.last_img read more

first_img View post tag: submarine View post tag: Serve View post tag: Navy Russia: Lada-Class Submarine to Serve and Pass Trials at NF Undergoing sea trials at Northern Fleet (NF), Lada-class lead submarine St. Petersburg will also perform combat tasks…[mappress]Source: Russian Navy, September 26, 2012 Share this article View post tag: Pass View post tag: NF View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic Back to overview,Home naval-today Russia: Lada-Class Submarine to Serve and Pass Trials at NF September 26, 2012 View post tag: trials Training & Education View post tag: Lada-Classlast_img read more

first_imgConsumer rights campaigner Which? has issued the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) with a “super-complaint” regarding supermarket pricing practices. It claimed some were “misleading” and the CMA must now, by law, respond within 90 days as to whether an inquiry will be launched.Which? said it had identified a range of pricing tactics in supermarkets, such as multi-buys, smaller products and exaggerated discounts, which it claimed confused consumers and left them out of pocket.The main concerns are:• Confusing and misleading special offers• Lack of easily comparable prices because of the way unit pricing is being done• Shrinking pack sizes without any corresponding price reduction.Which? warned that, with £115bn spent on groceries and toiletries in 2013, consumers could be losing out on hundreds of millions of pounds, even if just a small number of promotions were misleading.Richard Lloyd, Which? executive director, said: “Despite Which? repeatedly exposing misleading and confusing pricing tactics, and calling for voluntary change by the retailers, these dodgy offers remain on numerous supermarket shelves.”Industry body the British Retail Consortium (BRC) said it did not accept the implications of the complaint, based on the specific nature of the issues outlined.last_img read more

first_imgIt was a cool Marathon Monday in Boston and the on-site medical tents were keeping up with the stream of running-related strains, sprains, and dehydration cases that the event normally brings.Across town, in Boston’s Longwood section, Stephanie Kayden, senior physician in charge of the emergency room at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), a Harvard affiliate, and instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS), headed a team of about 50 that, in addition to handling the regular big-city emergency traffic, had been waiting for overflow and the more serious cases from the tents.“We thought we were going to be free and clear,” Kayden said.Then came the message that there had been a bombing. Kayden, the emergency department staff, and the hospital’s incident command team — already on alert because of the marathon — sprang into action, clearing out current patients, admitting those who couldn’t go home, and releasing those who could.They called in extra trauma teams, adding 60 doctors, nurses, and other staff, more than doubling the medical personnel in the emergency department. Over the coming hours, the Brigham team treated 31 patients — two in critical condition and nine with injuries severe enough to go directly into surgery. The most badly injured, Kayden said, was a man whose right leg had been blown off below the knee.A similar scene played out at hospitals across the city, including other Harvard-affiliated institutions such as Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), and Children’s Hospital Boston.The poised response was a tribute to the training that prepares medical personnel to handle such crises, Kayden said.“Even though the Brigham had never, to this time, had to respond to a bombing, these mass casualty events, as we call them, are something we train for all the time,” Kayden said. “When it finally happened, it was a testament to our training and to the drilling by our incident command team at the hospital that everything went as smoothly as it did.”“Even though the Brigham had never, to this time, had to respond to a bombing, these mass casualty events, as we call them, are something we train for all the time,” said Stephanie Kayden. File photo by Katherine C. CohenArnold Howitt, co-director of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Program on Crisis Leadership and executive director of the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, said the preparation was apparent across the city. Despite the large number of casualties, emergency crews were able to stabilize victims on-site and rapidly transfer them to the hospital. Major medical centers were able to absorb the sudden influx of badly injured patients.Michael VanRooyen, director of the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI), an HMS professor and an emergency physician at the Brigham, was among those who responded Monday. When he looked at the doctors around him, he realized many — including Kayden — were affiliated with HHI and had worked with the organization in crises around the world.“As I, like many of my colleagues, came the ER to help, I realized that most of the physicians on duty were our HHI doctors. They were as composed today as they have been in many humanitarian crises around the world,” VanRooyen said in a statement posted on the HHI website. “Yesterday was another reminder that the work we do globally is closely tied, in character and impact, to the work we do here at home.”While Harvard-affiliated physicians were responding to the needs of dozens of badly injured patients, Nicholas Christakis was trying to make sure Pforzheimer House students weren’t among them. He spent the afternoon seeking information about three student runners and dozens more who had been in the crowd. As people gathered to discuss the attacks, one Pforzheimer House tutor, a former Army explosives expert, talked about IEDs, or improvised explosive devices.“We were deeply alarmed during the course of the day here at Pforzheimer House until we could account for all of our students,” Christakis said. “We did everything from consulting our own U.S. Army bomb disposal expert to taking to Facebook.”Christakis, a professor at both HMS and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ Sociology Department, is a specialist in social networks and how both good and bad effects — including things like happiness, obesity, and smoking — tend to travel along those intricate pathways. And, though people woke up in anger and despair across the region Tuesday, the bombing is the kind of event that doesn’t need social networks, Christakis said. Instead, it affects people directly.“There are physical shockwaves that emanate from the bomb, and there are psychological shockwaves as well,” he said.The impact at Harvard was magnified because of our proximity to the incident, Christakis said, showing the psychological power of nearby events to draw people’s attention, even though more distant or diffuse incidents might be more destructive or have higher death tolls.Assistant Professor of Psychiatry Michael Miller, of HMS and BIDMC, said some of the attacks’ deep impact may stem from the nature of the marathon itself.Unlike other sporting events where the losing side goes away hurt or angry, the marathon is a celebration of participation, of the athletic spirit that drives ordinary people to do something extraordinary. In Boston, it’s also an unofficial spring festival, celebrated by the entire community, with people sitting on lawn chairs and eating ice cream along the course.“Here, everybody is just enjoying a community event in the most marvelous way,” Miller said.The attack also affected people because it punctured the feeling of invincibility most of us carry just to function properly each day. It served as an unwelcome reminder of how vulnerable we are, Miller said.For those who were directly affected, recovery may entail acute medical care, physical and psychological therapy, and perhaps follow-up treatment.“It’s on a case-by-case basis, one size does not fit all,” Miller said. “If you were really close and suffered a life-changing injury, then you may have a lot of work to do to try to understand, try to figure out what happened in such a random and horrible event.”For those angry or depressed but not directly affected by the attacks, the old saying “time heals all wounds,” will likely apply, Miller said. Not watching every bit of news coverage may help, he added.“People will remember it, it will be on their minds, depending on how close to the tragedy they were,” Miller said. “People who ran the race will think about it more than I will, people downtown will think about it more than those in Newton. Time does heal.”last_img read more

first_imgPresident Joe Biden has chosen two Harvard faculty members with deep diplomatic experience to fill senior government positions, signaling his intention to emphasize diplomacy and soft power in rebuilding U.S. influence on the world stage.Wendy R. Sherman, professor of the practice of public leadership at Harvard Kennedy School and director of the School’s Center for Public Leadership, has been nominated to serve as deputy secretary of state.  Samantha Power, the Anna Lindh Professor of the Practice of Global Leadership and Public Policy at the Kennedy School and the William D. Zabel ’61 Professor of the Practice in Human Rights at Harvard Law School, has been nominated to be the administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development.Both women held high-ranking positions during the Obama Administration.Power served as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations from 2013 to 2017 and before that as special assistant to the president and senior director for multilateral affairs and human rights. A former journalist, Power won the Pulitzer Prize for her book, “A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide,” and has written a memoir, “The Education of an Idealist.”  Before joining the U.S. government, Power was the founding executive director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy and a professor at the Kennedy School.Sherman served as under secretary of state for political affairs from 2011 to 2015. She was the lead negotiator for the Iran nuclear deal and also led talks with North Korea on its nuclear and ballistic missiles programs. She began her career as a social worker and activist on child welfare and low-income housing issues and was director of EMILY’s List before joining the State Department during the Clinton administration. She is the author of “Not for the Faint of Heart: Lessons in Courage, Power and Persistence.”Biden has pledged to elevate the role of diplomacy in rebuilding America’s international standing after what he has described as the isolationist approach of the Trump administration. Sherman and Power both are on record stressing the vital importance of raising the profile of  alliance-based diplomacy and support for human rights as leading tools of U.S. foreign policy.“Wendy Sherman and Samantha Power have contributed so much to the Kennedy School, through their teaching, writing, and engagement with public leaders,” Kennedy School Dean Douglas Elmendorf said. “Our loss now is the country’s gain, and we look forward to welcoming them both back to the Kennedy School in a few years and learning from their new experiences.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

first_imgWhen Dell and EMC merged, our leadership team made an important decision about our midrange portfolio to bring the best products from both companies together, raising some questions in the industry about overlap and rationalization. There was skepticism about which products might see end of life and whether buyers might be stranded.Let me be very clear about the future direction of our midrange portfolio – we are fully committed to our entire midrange product family including Dell EMC Unity and the Dell EMC SC Series. Each product solves different customer problems and is suited for different environments. Customers can buy both Dell EMC Unity and SC Series today and with continued confidence in the future.We feel the best path is to offer customers choice in price, performance and features suitable for small-to-medium businesses to large enterprise customers. Here we stand just nine months later and the market has spoken. After bringing forward both the Dell EMC Unity and Dell EMC SC Series midrange storage platforms, our decision to keep both product lines has been validated – Dell EMC grew worldwide external midrange storage revenues 32.8 percent sequentially which resulted in a sequential revenue share gain of 1.5 points (from a 29.2 percent share in Q3CY16 to 30.7 percent in Q4CY16.)[i].Dell EMC Unity generated a high double-digit quarter-over-quarter revenue increase from Q316 to Q416 and SC Series revenue also grew by double digits from Q316-Q416. This all reflects on another positive trend for the Dell EMC midrange storage portfolio – we saw a substantial increase in total customers for Dell EMC Unity and SC Series from Q316-Q416.[ii]We’d like to think that validation of this strategy translates into the kind of success our customers are experiencing with Dell EMC Unity, our best-in-class midrange all-flash offering and SC Series, our best-in-class hybrid storage for the midrange. Both Dell EMC Unity and SC Series are essential in this strategy. Customers are choosing these solutions to help modernize their data centers and simplify the way in which business data is managed while reducing TCO of the IT assets that power the business.Here are a few recent customer examples that prove this out:Dell EMC Unity:The Society of Swedish Literature (SLS) in Finland, established in 1885, is the eldest non-profit in Finland and wanted to create a modern IT infrastructure that would support the organization’s work and protect SLS’ digitized cultural treasuries, while also being flexible, easy to deploy and use. In the end, SLS chose a Unity system optimized for simplicity and all-flash performance.According to Madsen Wikholm, IT manager for SLS, “The [Dell EMC] Unity user interface seems like a godsend, or close to it.”The SLS realized the benefits of their Dell EMC Unity system including:Performance improvements of their front-line storageSimplified IT management through an HTML5 interface and VMware integrationSupport for multiple protocols (block, file, and vVols) streamlining their storage footprintDell EMC SC Series:The Oregon Judicial Department, the judicial branch for the State of Oregon is another customer that has had recent success with our midrange storage products. The Oregon Judicial Department Server Team for years had struggled with modernizing and unifying their aging SAN and NAS systems in its data center. Their struggles included multiple SAN vendors, isolated backend protocols and a lack of capability across the SAN architecture to provide reliable application performance. According to Peter Diec, Lead Server Administrator for the Enterprise Technology Services Division for the Oregon Judicial Department, “Our ultimate objective for our next generation SAN architecture was performance, uniformity and simplicity.” They chose the SC Series 8000, 2060 and the FS8600 to deliver the consistent performance needed to power its VMware, Microsoft SQL Server, CommVault Enterprise Backup and other related business applications. The result of its data center upgrade enabled the Oregon Judicial Department to create uniformity across multiple environments and helped reduce IT man-hours spent managing storage by consolidating to a single storage solution.The key to the success of both these products has been our ability to address a wide variety of customer needs through continuous innovation and in ensuring customers see immediate and tangible benefits when deploying Dell EMC storage products in their environment. We recently upped the ante on this promise with a new storage efficiency guarantee for Dell EMC midrange customers who opt for all-flash configurations.The All-Flash Storage Efficiency Guarantee is a new program guaranteeing customers who purchase Dell EMC XtremIO, VMAX All Flash, Dell EMC Unity and SC Series all-flash array configurations with an effective logical storage capacity at least four times (4:1) the physical capacity of the drives purchased in their new array – leveraging our powerful efficiency features that are native to our systems. The end result is that customers are able to squeeze more valuable data into less space with less management effort, while aggressively reducing start-up and lifecycle costs.With market share momentum and more new customers coming on-board, the combined Dell EMC midrange storage business has hit its stride. And with Dell EMC World 2017 not far away, we’re looking forward to showing off BOTH of our leading midrange storage products to all of our valued customers, partners, media and analysts in Las Vegas. Also be prepared to see many new surprises we will be introducing into our market-leading midrange portfolio. You asked, and we are delivering! Look forward to seeing you in Las Vegas![i] IDC Worldwide Quarterly Enterprise Storage Systems Tracker – Q4 2016, March 3, 2017[ii] From Dell EMC internal figuresTop image via Creative Commons by Mike Lizzi.last_img read more

first_img View Comments Jeremy Kushnier Star Files Directed by Damien Gray, Atomic blasts open the doors of the Manhattan Project, a Government funded program of top scientists with the task of creating the world’s first Atomic Bomb. Leo Szilard (Kushnier) is the mastermind behind atomic power, but his heart has reservations. Ethics, scientific progress, and true love are tested as Leo discovers exactly what he’s capable of when someone believes in him. Related Shows In addition to Kushnier, Morton, Gettelfinger and Harrison, the cast of Atomic includes David Abeles, Alexis Fishman, Jonathan Hammond, James David Larson, Preston Sadlier and Grace Stockdale. Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 16, 2014 The U.S. premiere of Atomic celebrates its official opening night on July 13 at the Acorn Theatre at Theatre Row. The off-Broadway musical, penned by Danny Ginges, Gregory Bonsignore and Philip Foxman, will run through August 16. Jeremy Kushnier, Euan Morton, Sara Gettelfinger and Randy Harrison star in the new tuner Atomiclast_img read more

first_imgWith the gross domestic product growth rate currently at 2.1% and unemployment at 3.6%, economists and presidential election prognosticators are wondering if the economy, particularly the stock market, will continue to grow. Or, are we headed for a bubble that might burst, sending the economy into a tailspin?Indicators suggest there is room for further growth and a catastrophe is unlikely, at least not immediately. On the other hand, individual investors and the general public may not be feeling the love that has benefited big business. Here’s why:The top 10%, the wealthy, owned 81% of all stocks and only 54% of families owned stock, either directly or indirectly as part of a fund and/or 401K plan.There was a small correction of the stock market at the end of 2018 that led many investors to withdraw money from the market in early 2019. Because there was a quick recovery, many did not have the chance to get back in. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more