first_imgIf you’ve ever looked at the thriving IT, compliance and fintech industries and wondered how to enter the sector, then the Letterkenny Institute of Technology is a good place to start. Post graduate programmes at LYIT have been designed to meet the demands of today’s job market. Courses in governance & compliance, leadership and business systems, among many others, are provided to equip people with the skills they need to seize job opportunities locally and elsewhere. One such graduate is Emma Lundberg (36) from Ramelton, Co. Donegal. Emma is in the final months of her one-year Masters in Governance, Compliance & Data Protection in Financial Services.She wanted a change after 10 years as a people manager in a telco company. Having gained a Business & Marketing degree from LYIT 13 years previously, she knew that she needed to retrain if she wanted a change.As a result of her upskilling, Emma has been promoted to the role of Compliance Analyst for the same company in their Dublin office.Emma’s Masters helped her gain practical and transferable skills in IT, risk and audit, privacy, GDPR, fintech and financial regulation to move up the ladder. Emma Lundberg is a Compliance Analyst after completing an M.A. in Governance, Compliance and Data Protection in Financial Services at LYITThe degree’s focus on privacy and information security was a key driver for Emma in choosing the MA (Master of Arts).“Any course with an element of Data Protection would have wide ranging benefits given the reach of new GDPR legislation.”“The course content was also varied enough to give me an insight into other areas of business that I hadn’t previously had exposure to, like the areas of FinTech, financial services, IT as well as risk and audit.”With one day of classes per week supplemented with online learning, Emma was able to study at LYIT while keeping up with her full-time job and family life. She found that staff at the college worked to make the experience as manageable as possible for mature learners.“Studying with a full time job and a family is never easy, however the year flies in so quickly you don’t really have a chance to think about it. The lecturers were great in that they made sure that deadlines for coursework submissions never fell too closely together,” she said. “LYIT were also really easy to deal with when it came to fee payments, many students availed of the option to spread fee payments over several months instead of having to pay all in one go.”Letterkenny Institute of TechnologyEmma also had the support of her employers as she upskilled. “They were clear that from my personal development perspective I was interested in moving roles,” she said.The company offered flexibility to Emma so she could switch focus between work and study.The hard work paid off, as Emma’s MA helped her secure several interviews for compliance roles.  “Ultimately, I was lucky enough to stay with the same company as a new role became available in their information security department. I’ve been in my new role for 2 months now and I would say that the course content covered really prepared me for a compliance role,” she said.“As someone who had very little technical experience before completing this MA, and even less regulatory experience, the skills learning have meant that I have been able to work successfully in an information security role. “I would also say that the skills learned on this course are very transferable, while the course has a strong fintech element, as many of our local employers are fintech organisations, I have been able to remain working in the telco industry and the course content has been just as relevant for me.”For Emma, this MA is only the start. In the absence of experience, she was able to show her employers that she has a good understanding of the current regulatory environment, industry standards and frameworks. Now, she has set her sights on progressing even further into this field. She said: “I think my decision to retrain has already opened the door to new opportunities, this is just the start! I am already planning to complete some certifications and I’d love to retrain further in the area of cyber security. All in good time!”LYIT is currently recruiting for the next intake of this MA and there are still some available places. The course begins at the end of September 2019, find out more at lyit.ieLearn more about this M.A in Governance, Compliance and Data Protection in Financial Services programme by signing up for a free webinar which is scheduled for 28th August 2019 at 7pm:Click here to register for the free webinarFor queries and more information, contact Siobhan Cullen, Head of Department Law & Humanities, by email [email protected] or tel 074918620Upskilling at LYIT: How Emma’s M.A. helped her change career was last modified: August 22nd, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Compliance and Data Protection in Financial ServiceseducationfintechGDPRGovernanceLYITMasterspostgraduateupskillinglast_img read more

first_imgQPR boss Mark Hughes is considering a loan move for Porto centre-back Rolando and will complete the signing of Brazil goalkeeper Julio Cesar from Inter Milan in the next 48 hours, the Daily Mail report.It is claimed Rolando has been targeted because moves for Michael Dawson and Ricardo Carvalho have stalled.Meanwhile, Liverpool boss Brendan Rodgers is planning a £15m swoop for Chelsea forward Daniel Sturridge, the Daily Mirror say.It is suggested that Rodgers is ready to sell Charlie Adam and Stewart Downing in order to fund the deal.He is said to be a big admirer of Sturridge, whose future at Stamford Bridge has long been the subject of speculation.Sturridge has made it clear he wants to play in a centre-forward role rather than the wide position he has operated in for much of his time at Chelsea.The Blues are reportedly aware of Liverpool’s interest but would be reluctant to sell unless they sign a striker before this week’s transfer deadline.The Sun say Chelsea want £25m for Sturridge and that Tottenham are also interested in him, while the Daily Mail suggest Rodgers has made an inital enquiry and will try to land the England international for £10m.Chelsea manager Roberto Di Matteo recently stated that he expected Sturridge to stay at the club.The Mail say Chelsea are tracking 23-year-old Montpellier defender Mapou Yanga-Mbiwa.Meanwhile, Tottenham could offer Jermain Defoe to Fulham as part of an exchange deal for Moussa Dembele, according to the Mirror.It is claimed that David Bentley and Jermaine Jenas could also be offered to the Whites as Spurs look to take Dembele to White Hart Lane.Tottenham’s apparent interest in the Belgian is also reported by The Guardian, while the Mail suggest Fulham are monitoring powerful Genk forward Christian Benteke as a possible replacement for Clint Dempsey.This page is regularly updated. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Ellen Essman, Senior Research Associate, Ohio State University Extension Agricultural & Resource Law ProgramWell, it’s been a while since we’ve written about the Waters of the United States (WOTUS), so everyone had to know we were overdue for WOTUS news!On Dec. 11, 2018, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Army Corps of Engineers announced the Trump Administration’s so-called “straightforward” new definition of WOTUS under the Clean Water Act (CWA). Publication of the proposed rule was delayed due to the federal government shutdown in December and January. The proposed rule was finally published in the Federal Register on Feb. 14, 2019. Interested parties can comment on the proposed WOTUS rule until April 15, 2019. Information on how to comment can be found here, and the proposed rule in its entirety can be found here. Out with the old WOTUS…The new definition would replace the 2015 definition of WOTUS promulgated under the Obama Administration. The 2015 definition is codified at 33 CFR 328. The 2015 definition defined waters of the United States as:All waters which are currently used, or were used in the past, or may be susceptible to use in interstate or foreign commerce, including all waters which are subject to the ebb and flow of the tide;All interstate waters including interstate wetlands;All other waters such as intrastate lakes, rivers, streams (including intermittent streams), mudflats, sandflats, wetlands, sloughs, prairie potholes, wet meadows, playa lakes, or natural ponds, the use, degradation or destruction of which could affect interstate or foreign commerce including any such waters:Which are or could be used by interstate or foreign travelers for recreational or other purposes; orFrom which fish or shellfish are or could be taken and sold in interstate or foreign commerce; orWhich are used or could be used for industrial purpose by industries in interstate commerce;All impoundments of waters otherwise defined as waters of the United States under the definition;Tributaries of waters identified in paragraphs (a) (1) through (4) of this section;The territorial seas;Wetlands adjacent to waters (other than waters that are themselves wetlands) identified in paragraphs (a) (1) through (6) of this section.Waters of the United States do not include prior converted cropland. Notwithstanding the determination of an area’s status as prior converted cropland by any other Federal agency, for the purposes of the Clean Water Act, the final authority regarding Clean Water Act jurisdiction remains with the EPA.The 2015 definition also noted that “[w]aste treatment systems, including treatment ponds or lagoons designed to meet requirements of CWA…are not waters of the United States” (emphasis added). …In with the new WOTUSThe Trump Administration’s new proposed definition of WOTUS would make significant changes to the definition listed above. Under the new proposed rule, section (a) of §328.3 would define waters of the United States as:Waters which are currently used, or were used in the past, or may be susceptible to use in interstate or foreign commerce, including the territorial seas and waters which are subject to the ebb and flow of the tide;Tributaries of waters identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section;Ditches that satisfy any of the conditions identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, ditches constructed in a tributary or that relocate or alter a tributary as long as those ditches also satisfy the conditions of the tributary definition, and ditches constructed in an adjacent wetland as long as those ditches also satisfy the conditions of the tributary definition;Lakes and ponds that satisfy any of the conditions identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, lakes and ponds that contribute perennial or intermittent flow to a water identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section in a typical year either directly or indirectly through a water(s) identified in paragraphs (a)(2) through (6) of this section or through water features identified in paragraph (b) of this section so long as those water features convey perennial or intermittent flow downstream, and lakes and ponds that are flooded by a water identified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (5) of this section in a typical year;Impoundments of waters identified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (4) and (6) of this section; andAdjacent wetlands to waters identified in paragraphs (a) (1) through (5) of this section.Every other type of water in this proposed definition relates back to the waters described in (1), which the EPA describes as “traditional navigable waters.” For example, tributaries that are WOTUS would be those bodies of water that empty into or connect to traditional navigable waters. Similarly, lakes and ponds are WOTUS under the definition if they are traditional navigable waters themselves, or if they flow regularly into traditional navigable waters. An EPA fact sheet, available here, is very helpful in understanding what is included under the proposed WOTUS definition. It describes the six proposed categories of WOTUS in layman’s terms, and provides examples of bodies of water that fall under each category.The newly proposed rule also greatly expands the list of waters that are not waters of the United States in section (b):Waters or water features that are not identified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (6) of this section;Groundwater, including groundwater drained through subsurface drainage systems;Ephemeral features and diffuse stormwater run-off, including directional sheet flow over upland;Ditches that are not identified in paragraph (a)(3) of this section;Prior converted cropland;Artificially irrigated areas, including fields flooded for rice or cranberry growing, that would revert to upland should application of irrigation water to that area cease;Artificial lakes and ponds constructed in upland (including water storage reservoirs, farm and stock watering ponds, and log cleaning ponds) which are not identified in paragraph (a)(4) or (a)(5) of this section;Water-filled depressions created in upland incidental to mining or construction activity, and pits excavated in upland for the purpose of obtaining fill, sand, or gravel;Stormwater control features excavated or constructed in upland to convey, treat, infiltrate or store stormwater run-off;Wastewater recycling structures constructed in upland, such as detention, retention and infiltration basins and ponds, and groundwater recharge basins; andWaste treatment systems. Notable differences between 2015 rule and proposed ruleJust glancing at the two rules, it is obvious that there are major differences in how WOTUS is defined. EPA has a useful fact sheet (highly recommended reading) outlining the “key proposed changes” and how they compare to the 2015 WOTUS rule, as well as to the pre-2015 WOTUS rule. Overall, it appears that the number of water bodies considered WOTUS would decrease under the proposed rule. EPA argues that limiting the number of waters classified as WOTUS would give more power to the states to regulate waters as they see fit.One major change is that under the proposed rule, tributaries that are “ephemeral” (meaning they’re not around for a great deal of time, and/or may be there because of rainfall or snowmelt, etc.), are not considered to be WOTUS. Similarly, the number of ditches considered to be WOTUS would decrease under the new rule. Upland ditches and ephemeral ditches would no longer fall under WOTUS. The number of wetlands considered WOTUS would also take a hit under the new rule. Wetlands would either have to “abut” other WOTUS or “have a direct hydrological surface connection” to WOTUS in a “typical year” to fall under the new definition. Furthermore, wetlands would no longer be considered to be “adjacent,” and therefore connected to WOTUS, if they are “physically separated from jurisdictional waters by a berm, dike, or other barrier.” Finally, you guessed it— the number of lakes and ponds considered WOTUS would also be reduced, since they would no longer connect through “adjacent” wetlands. What’s next?It’s important to remember that this new WOTUS rule is not currently effective — they are just proposed rules, open to public comment. In the meantime, due to litigation, what qualifies as WOTUS depends on the state. EPA has a map depicting which definition of WOTUS currently applies where. In some states, the 2015 rule applies, and in others the pre-2015 rule applies. Obama’s 2015 rule applies in Ohio at this time. If the proposed rule makes it through the rulemaking process and goes into effect, it will replace the 2015 and pre-2015 rules, and barring any other lawsuits, will apply nationwide. The ultimate implementation of this rule is anything but certain; changes and challenges to the rule are likely to occur.last_img read more

first_imgIn a decision that is set to rock the walls of Indian football, Punjab’s JCT club on Monday disbanded its team. The club management termed the lack of popularity of the game in the country behind the judgement.This comes a year after another top club, Mahindra United disbanded its team. JCT, a pioneer in promoting football in Northern India, was going through a poor form in recent times and was relegated from the first division of the I-League this season.”JCT Limited has taken a strategic decision to pull out for the time being till football in India shows some possibility of generating value for corporates and their brands, besides bringing up popularity of football among youngsters,” a club official said in a statement.JCT won the inaugural National Football League in the 1996-97 season. That was a golden period for the Phagwara based side as it won the Durand Cup, Federation Cup as well as the IFA shield.But recently the 40-year-old club’s performance has not been up to the mark.It’s only remarkable performance in the recent past was when it reached the final of the 2010 Durand Cup.The club management reiterated that the depleting visibility of India football was a major reason behind the decision. “JCT won the inaugural Football League in 1996, where there was high quality TV exposure and widespread public interest. But since then the League has had negligible exposure and the teams have almost gone unnoticed,” the club official said.India coach Armando Colaco too came hard on the low returns that football in the country offers to the club owners.advertisement”The club owners invest so much money but honestly speaking the return is zero. The big clubs like Mohun Bagan, East Bengal, Dempo have sponsors but what about the small clubs?” Colaco, who is also the general secretary of Dempo SC, said.”They struggle to pile up the money to build a team. Add to this the rising prices of top footballers where a player is demanding more than Rs 2 crores.”A top AIFF official shared Colaco’s sentiment. “It is a very unfortunate incident, but unless the league is professionalised and telecast, owning clubs can never be a profitable venture. At the moment, clubs don’t get back even 10 per cent of what they invest,” he told MAIL TODAY, on condition of anonymity.”It is obvious that it becomes an issue for them in the longer run as they are also answerable to their shareholders. Once a more professional approach is taken, as suggested by new sponsors IMG-Reliance, I am sure thinks will look up.”While Indian businessmen are ready to invest in foreign clubs, they refuse to invest in Indian clubs as it is a fruitless investment.Unless teams get more visibility, it will be impossible to attract sponsors and fanbase and teams will go the JCT and Mahindra United way.” Parminder, who is the current coach of the team, was unaware of the decision.”I was travelling to Chandigarh when I came to know about the decision. I had no prior information about this. After I return to Phagwara I will talk to the club management about this,” he said.”I don’t think there was any financial constraint on the club.”last_img read more

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Hodgson warns Crystal Palace fans of daunting fixture runby Paul Vegas18 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveRoy Hodgson says Crystal Palace must stay realistic ahead of a daunting fixture run.The Eagles are sixth on the Premier League table heading into the international thanks to Saturday’s win over West Ham United.They will face Manchester City, Arsenal, Leicester City and Chelsea in their next four games.”Things will change,” Hodgson said. “I still fully believe in a championship being a marathon race. It’s nice to start reasonably well and be up with the front runners, but you know you’ve got to keep up that pace and one of the things we don’t have is a big squad.”But if we can keep our heads above water and get to January I hope we can do something about that.” last_img read more

first_imgAward-winning singer/songwriter Miranda Lambert stays in harmony by eating a good breakfast that includes lowfat milk each and every day.Miranda Lambert Kicks off CMA Awards with New Milk Mustache Ad.The country musician dons her cowboy boots, picks up her guitar, and sports a Milk Mustache in the first-ever ad from the National Milk Mustache “got milk?” Campaign unveiled at the Country Music Association headquarters in Nashville, TN.The “got milk?” Campaign’s The Breakfast Project struck a chord with Lambert because it encourages Americans to enjoy breakfast at home and set the table with milk in the morning. The ad showcases her favorite way to start the day: with a tall glass of milk and a bowl of cereal while strumming her guitar. The ad copy reads “Fine tune your morning. got milk? Nourish every day.”Miranda makes a point to eat breakfast at home – whether it’s on the ranch she shares with her husband or the tour bus she shares with her band mates – and knows milk is a hall of famer at the breakfast table. With nine essential nutrients, including high-quality protein, it helps make her breakfast more complete. Whether in a glass, cup or bowl, milk enhances the nutritional value of her morning meal so she has nutrients she needs to keep rockin’ all day long.Visit TheBreakfastProject.com or www.facebook.com/MilkMustache and follow @MilkMustache on Twitter to join the got milk? community and stay up-to-date on the latest Milk Mustache celebrity news. You can also learn more about breakfast nutrition, find morning recipes for your family and see exclusive behind-the-scenes video and photos of Miranda Lambert.Source:PR Newswirelast_img read more

first_imgWhen we think about organising precarious “gig” workers, the task seems biblical. Low pay and no benefits that accrue to gig workers are worsened by the uncertainty of a position where you can only work to deliver something specifically demanded by consumers and at a premium you are often powerless to control. App companies misclassify workers as independent contractors rather than employees in order to pass on all of the maintenance and capital costs, aside from web work and marketing, to the workers, avoiding personnel benefit and equipment costs that are routine for regular employers. Conditions seem to cry out a union. A recent “strike” by Uber drivers in Los Angeles illustrates the kind of problem we deal with when we discuss gig workers and their ability to fight for better conditions. The company had triggered the strike by increasing its percentage of the fare, thereby decreasing drivers’ pay. In response, the drivers turned off the Uber application on their phone. Stated more plainly, they went on strike by simply not responding to any calls or inducements to drive. Did it work? Who knows? How would any of us, whether organisers, curious observers, or company officials, know how to measure the number of drivers protesting in this way versus those who just decided not to drive on any given day or got ticked-off and responded to Lyft instead? ACORN tried a similar approach in the early 1970s when we were fighting increases by the Arkla Gas Company in central Arkansas. Our “Turn Off Arkla Day!” action got a bit of press, as the Uber drivers did in Los Angeles. But in both cases, the company yawned since there was no way to measure whether the strike affected their cash flow. Organising gig workers can be challenging, but there’s some good work going on for bicycle delivery drivers in Europe, where companies like Uber Eats, Deliveroo, and others have become ubiquitous. Last fall, one of ACORN’s affiliates organised a meeting in Brussels that brought together union activists interested in organising European bicycle delivery drivers with fledgeling groups of drivers from a dozen countries including the UK, the Netherlands, and Germany. That meeting highlighted several active organising projects: – Bike Workers Advocacy Project (BWAP), a new group seeking to organise cycling workers and, eventually, lead to some kind of unionisation or union-style representation. Drivers at Postmates and Caviar in New York City and some bicycle shops seemed to be stirring the pot in 2018, but nothing seems to have emerged formally to date. – Bike delivery workers at Foodora and Dilveroo in Germany have raised issues about low wages and their independent contractor situation while advocating for a union. – In 2016, London gig workers for delivery services Deliveroo and Uber Eats organised protests and strikes for higher wages. There was also an outcry in Philadelphia when a rider for Caviar was killed while working. – Legal action has managed to win back employment rights, such as a recent ruling in Spain that declared that a Deliveroo rider was, in fact, an employee and not an independent contractor, as the company claimed. Caviar is in mandatory arbitration in California on the same issue. Just as importantly, riders in London struck for three days in 2018 and joined with striking McDonalds’s workers to demand higher wages, largely organised by a chapter of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). While these examples seem promising, unions clearly lack any real commitment to organise these workers, and the workers have limited leverage. David Chu, who directs the European Organising Center, a joint project between European unions and the US-based Change to Win federation, told me recently that he hears a lot of talk about organising gig workers but sees little action in that direction. Serious organising efforts in the United States have been contradictory and are embryonic at best. Uber in New York City and San Francisco reacted to organising efforts by attempting to co-opt the organisations into agreeing that the workers were not employees in exchange for consultation rights on rule changes and other issues like receiving tips. More concerted efforts to create a mini-National Labor Relations Board representation mechanism were launched at the municipal level in Seattle, but the organising effort is currently mired in litigation over pre-emption by the National Labor Relations Act and the question of employee status. Local efforts reflect the way companies keep changing their practices, as Marielle Benchehboune, coordinator of ACORN’s affiliate, ReAct, noted recently in Forbes. “What will make the difference,” she suggested, is workers organising “on the transnational scale.” Perhaps her analysis is correct. Perhaps a rare global organising plan could create enough pressure and leverage among these competing companies that could weld a workers’ movement together from the disparate pieces of independent worker mobilisations that are cropping up around the world. Given the challenges, how much should we invest in organising gig workers? Labour economists in the US caution that despite all of the hype from Silicon Valley and even some labour officials about the emerging gig economy, it involves a very small percentage of the workforce. I heard something similar 15 years ago when I asked a leader of the Indian National Trade Union Congress if they were doing anything to organise call centre workers in India. He answered that they estimated that there were 30,000 such workers, but there were 450 million workers in India at the time and hardly nine per cent were organised. He then shrugged. That’s all he said, but we got the message. There’s much to be done in organising the unorganised; resources and capacity are always restrained, whether in India, Europe or North America. Is that a reason for not finding ways to organise workers who are attempting on their own to find justice in their jobs? Or is it just another rationale for doing little or nothing? The one thing that seems clear is that if unions are going to be relevant to the modern workforce and the irregular and precarious forms of work that are being created by technology married to avarice, we must debate and address these challenges. It may be difficult, but unions and organisers need to devise practical strategies that allow workers to organise, win, and build enough power to force companies to adapt and change. IPA (Courtesy: People’s World The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

first_img TSX (Toronto Stock Exchange) 15,569.92 15,187.71 12,845.06 Oil 93.29 97.38 108.37 Rock & Stock Stats Last Gold 1,268.80 1,284.60 1,372.60 One Year Ago Dear Reader, We want to know what you think. In his article below, Jeff Clark outlines several reasons to be bullish or bearish on precious metals. You know what we think, but we’re interested in your take—and your intentions. If you’re game, please send an email to [email protected] and in 25 words or fewer, tell us your position and reasoning. For example: BOLD: Wall Street is due for a fall, and gold will rise in response. HOLD: Phony government numbers have fooled the public into thinking all is well, so gold may not rise for some time. FOLD: Obama saved us all, and you guys don’t know what you’re talking about. I only subscribe because I think Jeff Clark is cute. We may quote some of the more interesting remarks (light editing for grammar/spelling only), but will include only a first name and last initial to respect your privacy. Note that we recognize various points of view, which is why we have some bets on metals other than gold and silver—our platinum-palladium miner has worked out quite well this year, for instance—and we’ve taken out a new “gold insurance policy” via puts on GLD, in case the market turns against us for a while. The latter is already in the black, as of last week. Remember also that Doug Casey always says that smart speculators don’t put all their eggs in one basket, which is why these dispatches focus on metals and mining on Mondays and other market sectors on other days. Our colleagues in other Casey departments have some great opportunities shaping up. The right tech specs, for example, could hedge your mineral exploration specs. Some of our tech picks have already yielded triple-digit returns this year. As it happens, we’re offering subscribers our best bargain on a subscription package deal, but only for a limited time. When you upgrade your subscription to a Casey OnePass, you get ALL of our monthly newsletters for $1,749 per year. That’s over $2,000 off. Special discounts for Alert subscribers apply. Check it out, diversify, and don’t miss out. Sincerely, Louis James Senior Metals Investment Strategist Casey Research Gold Producers (GDX) 25.07 26.10 27.53center_img Silver 19.20 19.83 23.21 Silver Stocks (SIL) 12.75 13.70 15.09 Copper 3.16 3.20 3.24 Gold Junior Stocks (GDXJ) 39.30 41.33 46.07 One Month Ago TSX Venture 994.89 993.87 947.78last_img read more