first_imgInterior Undersecretary Jonathan Malaya disclosed this on Monday, saying that around 22 percent of all cities and municipalities were unable to meet the cash distribution following the deadline on Sunday. As of 11:59 p.m. on Sunday night, 77.42 percent or 1,265 out of 1,634 LGUs have completed the rollout, Malaya told CNN Philippines. MANILA – At least 369 local government units (LGUs) across the country failed to meet the deadline for the distribution of the first tranche of the national government’s social amelioration program (SAP).center_img Of the 1,265 LGUs that have completed the payout, 120 are in the Ilocos Region; 107 in Central Luzon; 112 in Bicol Region; and 71 in Calabarzon, he added.“Ang atin pong report galing sa ating mga regions as of 12 midnight last night is 1,265 na LGUs po ang nakahabol sa deadline, natapos nila lahat. This equates to a national payout rate of 90 percent… 90.86 percent… almost 91 percent po as of midnight last night,” said Malaya.Those who were not able to beat the deadline, according to Malaya, can continue to distribute them to their constituents, unless the Department of Social Welfare and Development demands for the return of the funds.“Our advice to LGUs that are not yet finished is to continue with SAP distribution even after the deadline,” Malaya said.The DILG has earlier warned that it will start issuing show cause orders to the LGUs, starting with those which showed “very poor performance” in the distribution of the emergency subsidy.Meanwhile, Presidential spokesperson Harry Roque made the same advice to LGUs who failed to complete the cash distribution on Sunday evening.“Patuloy pa rin dapat ang pamimigay until bawiin na ang pondo ng DSWD (Department of Social Welfare and Development),” Roque said in a virtual press conference on Monday.Roque also said that, with the near completion of the first tranche of emergency subsidies, the public could expect the distribution of the second tranche soon.The government initially allotted P200 billion to give the poorest families P5,000 to P8,000 each for two months. The program will be expanded to cover five million more families./PNlast_img read more

first_img$189 pedestrian street signs are available from the state via a county grant (the ones you put mid-crosswalk that say STOP when Pedestrian in crosswalk with the weighted bottoms).Why not ask area businesses in an editorial whether they’d donate the $ to sponsor one by their business?Chris Hammer Eatontownlast_img

first_imgThe Nelson Daily has learned Nelson’s Adam Wheeldon has signed on to play with the Trail Smoke Eaters of the BCHL Saturday.The 17-year-old forward played 44 games with Nelson last season as a 16-year-old, scoring two goals and registering nine assists. Used primarily as a checker, Wheeldon finished the season with 78 penalty minutes.The son of former Leaf coach Simon Wheeldon was traded to the Kelowna Chiefs during the summer by former Leaf coach and GM Chris Shaw.It was thought Wheeldon would attend the camp of the Westside Warriors but instead decided to attend Trail’s training [email protected]last_img read more

first_imgEureka >> In some stories it takes a while to get to the good part, and that was the case for the Humboldt B-52s Saturday evening.In the first game of the last home series of the summer, the Bombers overcame a 2-1 deficit to claim an 11-3 victory over the Bercovich Gold at Bomber Field.“It just took us a while to get to their pitcher,” B-52s head coach Scott St. John said. “We had some opportunities, and I think we let some get by us early, but we were right there with them. We were putting …last_img read more

first_imgAnother finding undermines the concept of “junk DNA.”  A team of scientists in Massachusetts found over a thousand functional RNA transcripts from intergenic sequences.  These RNA transcripts, coming not from genes but from regions earlier thought to be non-functional, take part in diverse functions from stem cell pluripotency to HOX gene developmental processes to cell proliferation.    The work by Guttman, Rinn et al was reported in Nature.1  The March 12 issue also included a technology feature highlighting the research of co-author John Rinn of the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts.2  The research team developed new methods for identifying the activity of large intervening non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs).  They also found that these RNAs are strictly regulated.    Recognizing that non-coding regions of DNA could be functional has “turbo-charged the field,” he said, “as not only can we identify these things now but we can get a good idea of what they might be doing to test functional relationships.”1.  Guttman et al, “Chromatin signature reveals over a thousand highly conserved large non-coding RNAs in mammals,” Nature 458, 223-227 (12 March 2009) | doi:10.1038/nature07672.2.  N.B., “Technology Feature: Transcriptomics: Rethinking junk DNA,” Nature 458, 240-241 (12 March 2009) | doi:10.1038/458240a.The few mentions of evolution in the main paper are instructive.  One of the methods the scientists used to identify functional RNA transcripts was “evolutionary conservation,” which means the lack of evolution.  Presumably a “conserved” (unevolved) region of DNA or RNA was protected from mutation and selection because it was too functional for Tinker Bell to tinker with.  There is a subset of natural selection called “purifying selection,” which essentially means “defending DNA from the ravages of mutation.”    The researchers found that these previously-unknown functional transcripts were, indeed, highly conserved in mammals: “In sharp contrast to previous collections,” they said, “these large intervening non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) show strong purifying selection in their genomic loci, exonic sequences and promoter regions, with greater than 95% showing clear evolutionary conservation.”  The team believes there could be many thousands of these lincRNAs in mammalian genomes.    If some of the other non-coding DNA is found to be functional, the implications would be hard on evolutionary theory: “the markedly low rate of conservation seen in the current catalogues of large non-coding transcripts ([less than] 5% of cases) is unprecedented and would require that each mammalian clade evolves its own distinct repertoire of non-coding transcripts.”  That would be too much new genetic information for a Darwinian mechanism to create.  For that reason, they are postulating that most of the RNAs represent “transcriptional noise, with a minority of bona fide functional lincRNAs hidden amid this background.”      The authors did acknowledge one point of logic: “Strictly speaking, the absence of evolutionary conservation cannot prove the absence of function.”  One of their criteria for measuring functionality of lincRNAs was the degree of conservation.  They hedged this criterion by saying, “We do not exclude the possibility that lincRNAs identified by shotgun sequencing that fail to show conservation are nonetheless functional, but other evidence will be required to establish this point.”    To avoid circular reasoning, they cannot use evolutionary conservation as support for evolutionary “purifying selection.”  If absence of evolutionary conservation cannot prove the absence of function, then neither can it prove evolution; the lack of conservation might be due to other causes, like design.  And if a host of functional unconserved transcripts are found, it will seriously call into question the ability of neo-Darwinism to generate a large amount of unique functional information in each mammal genome.    For the time being, Guttman et al are banking on the unconserved stuff being transcriptional noise.  The trend against the “junk DNA” paradigm is against them, however (11/07/2008, 02/06/2008, 09/12/2007, 07/16/2007, and especially 06/15/2007).  One additional thing from the paper is apparent: evolutionary theory was only incidental to the story.  What they were searching for was functional information, conservation, regulation, and the lack of evolution.  In a word, that’s design.  Chalk up another turbo-charged research project to the inherent motivation of ID science: seeking to understand the design in nature.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_img(Visited 41 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 A new fossil species of coelacanth was discovered in Canada.  Scientists think from its tail fin shape that it was a fast swimmer–perhaps a hunter.  Sadly, it was a “spectacular failure” in evolution.  The luck of the evolutionary draw went to today’s slow-moving, docile species.PhysOrg states that the new fossil “rewrites the history of ancient fish.”  The discoverers named it Rebellatrix, calling it a “rebel” that “does everything a coelacanth should not do.”  Modern coelacanths have broad tails and are fairly docile, but the discoverers think that the forked tail in Rebellatrix indicates it was a fast swimmer with a muscular tail fin.  National Geographic pointed out what this means to evolutionary theory:In general, the discovery “shows how plastic and flexible evolution can be,” said John Long, a coelacanth expert at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County in California.It really shakes things up “that coelacanths can suddenly deviate what they’ve been doing for 200 million years and occupy a lifestyle that’s radically different from other coelacanths.”Still, the fossil record shows that the slow-moving version of the coelacanth ultimately won out, while the speedy Rebellatrix was replaced by sharks and other cruising predators, study leader Wendruff said.“I like to say Rebellatrix was a spectacular failure.“National Geographic also reminded readers about the historic importance of the coelacanth as a living fossil:  “The coelacanth (pronounced SEE-la-kanth) is a type of primitive, slow-moving fish that was thought extinct until its rediscovery in 1938,” the article said.  “The modern fish is sometimes called a living fossil, because it apparently existed largely unchanged for 320 million years.”  The new find shows that only one species remains from a past diversity – survival of the dullest.Too bad for all the social Darwinists in the 1930s who glorified strength, speed, warfare and might as the evolutionary law of nature.  If you’re a modern evolutionist, maybe you should take a cue from the surviving coelacanths and pursue slothfulness (one of the seven deadly sins).Better yet, ditch Darwinism as a falsified Victorian myth.  Surviving “largely unchanged for 320 million years” should be a colossal embarrassment.  So is imagining these creatures going extinct millions of years ago then finding them doing just fine off the coast of India.  Remember, too, that the coelacanth had long been touted as a missing link, its bony fins suggesting it was a transitional form between fish with fins and feet.  Now that coelacanths still have those bony fins but don’t use them for anything resembling walking, that notion has been soundly debunked.  It’s a survivor; why call it “primitive”?Is something weird about this story?  Not if you have a good imagination and ponder “how plastic and flexible evolution can be.”Exercise: Try to find another law of nature that is plastic and flexible.  Skinner’s Constant,* perhaps?*Skinner’s Constant: That value which, when added to, subtracted from, multiplied or divided by the answer you got, gives you the answer you should have gotten.last_img read more

first_img(Visited 20 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Was there ever a time when humans were “pre-human”?  Recent finds are overturning assumptions about human ancestors.Antebellum:  Rewrite the story of ape and human brain evolution, advises Science Daily: the “unexpected” speedy expansion of the primate cerebellum was “up to six times faster than anticipated throughout the evolution of apes, including humans.”  So do we classify this story under mammalogy, anthropology, or physiology?  “In humans, the cerebellum contains about 70 billion neurons — four times more than in the neocortex,” Robert Barton of Durham University says.  “Nobody really knows what all these neurons are for, but they must be doing something important.”  That would seem to prompt an investigation based on intelligent design.  Prior to this, the neocortex was considered “the crowning achievement of evolution and the biological substrate of human mental prowess.”  One thing is clear: humans have archaeology; apes do not.  Barton remarked in Live Science‘s article that his findings “turn the story of brain evolution upside down.”  New Scientist got downright Kiplingesque with its panchreston, “Cerebellum’s growth spurt turned monkeys into humans.”Oldest human genome sequenced:  A bone of a modern human from western Siberia, said to date from 45,000 years ago, still had DNA in it.  The sequence, reported in Nature, messes up the old human evolution story, because even way out east, this individual had Neanderthal DNA mixed in his genome.  The interbreeding, scientists believe, must have happened even earlier, as much as 60,000 years ago or more.  This also means that individuals like this one were fully capable of migrating across continents, raising questions about why they didn’t start civilization for so long.  See Ewen Callaway’s news article on the story in Nature.Ten years of hobbit skull-scratching: In 2004, remains of diminutive humans were found in a cave on Flores Island, Indonesia.  They were named (after some dispute) Homo floresiensis, but popularly the “hobbits” because of their short stature.  Despite a decade of study, anthropologists are as confused by the skull, jaw, and various bones as they were then: they have both primitive and advanced traits, but are carbon-dated at 20,000 years old.  Are they examples of Homo erectus, or are they modern humans with a skull defect?  How did they get to this island across the sea?  Ewen Callaway in Nature tells the illustrated story with the major players, and also posted an interview with four key anthropologists.  “Small remains still pose big problems,” Chris Stringer writes in the same issue of Nature.The toolmaker:  “Ancient Stone Toolmaking Didn’t Just Spread Out of Africa with Humans,” writes Charles Q. Choi in Live Science. “An advanced way of crafting stone tools, once thought to have only originated in Africa, may have been invented elsewhere independently, according to a new study.”  This technology dates in the evolutionary scheme to some 200,000 to 300,000 years ago.  But if humans “invented” toolmaking, it didn’t evolve.  That makes it archaeology, not paleoanthropology.  Nature says “evolved independently among different groups of early humans in Eurasia and Africa,” but classifies the article under Archaeology.  The findings were published in Science Magazine.  See also summary on PhysOrg.It’s a long way from Australopithecus to Austria:  “Modern humans may have migrated into Austria 43,500 years ago” reads a headline on PhysOrg.  Logically, that implies they might not have, too, or that when they did, it was not 43,500 years ago but much sooner.  Look for the surprise phrase, “than previously thought.”  Here it is: based on some stone tools found in Austria, “The date of the artifacts represents the oldest well-documented occurrence of behaviorally modern humans in Europe and suggests contemporaneity with Neanderthals in other parts of Europe, showing that behaviorally modern humans and Neanderthals shared this region longer than previously thought.”  Question: did modern humans and Neanderthals have archaeology, or did Neanderthals have only paleoanthropology?  If the former, did the Neanderthals get it by intelligent design?Long way from Austria to the Andes:  A campsite of early Americans high in the Andes puts humans in South America a thousand years earlier than previously thought—12,800 years ago in the evolutionary timeline, reported Science Magazine.  They didn’t even have time to evolve high-altitude survival, but another question might be: what took them so long?  If humans made it to Siberia from Africa, and spread all across Europe and the far East, even traveling by boat, why didn’t they show up in the New World sooner?What’s the point?  The genome of an African man believed to have lived 2,300 years ago was sequenced, but then stories of what he did for a living and where he had migrated from twisted the genetic facts into a tale about evolution.  “What can DNA from the skeleton of a man who lived 2,330 years ago in the southernmost tip of Africa tell us about ourselves as humans?” Science Daily teases, to end with this quote from an evolutionist: “In this study, I believe we may have found an individual from a lineage that broke off early in modern human evolution and remained geographically isolated.”  Are they implying this African was inferior to the Europeans?  Any human living as recently as the times of the great empires was not evolving into anything.Now this is archaeology:  A 3,300 year old complex was discovered at Tel Burna in Israel, PhysOrg reported, complete with walls, utensils and objects that might have been associated with Baal worship often mentioned in the Bible.  In another PhysOrg entry, artifacts from an Iron Age chariot were found.  Objects included a curry comb probably used to groom the horses.  The science of archaeology is the study of remains created by intelligent agents for a purpose: i.e., it is a science of intelligent design.How did paleoanthropology become archaeology?  When did it become history?  What gave humans that extra spark that turned their brains into minds?  Evolutionists have no idea.  They just throw out absurd possibilities, like “Cerebellum’s growth spurt turned monkeys into humans”—(that has to be one of the stupidest headlines in recent memory).  What, did the cerebellum choose to have a growth spurt?  Is the human an accident of some monkey mutation?  Come on, you editors over there, use your brains and stop the nonsense!Evolutionary paleoanthropology is so mixed up, you can’t trust much of anything they say.  Every new story includes the clause, “these findings show that such-and-such was more something-or-other than previously thought.”  In other words, every previous “truth” of paleoanthropology was wrong.  What they believe today is vastly different from what was taught as fact just a few years ago (just one recent example: cave art story from 10/14/14).  Paleoanthropologists love the darkness of their storytelling imaginations rather than the light of logic and the world’s best written record of how man came to be.The absence of artifacts does not prove that humans who left their skeletal remains were incapable of making them.  The presence of simple stone tools does not prove that the creators were mentally incapable of doing better.  There can be other explanations, like isolation from technology of other groups, harsh conditions allowing nothing more than subsistence living, poverty, disease, or personal choices for simple living, like some ethic groups live today—living out their lives by hunting and gathering, leaving no art or literature.  All other evidence shows that humans have always been thinking, reasoning, sentient beings with minds capable of great things, given the right circumstances.  What is outrageously absurd is to believe that upright, migrating, fire-using humans with large brains spent hundreds of thousands of years sitting around in caves doing nothing.last_img read more

first_imgCPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA READ: Standhardinger no-show at PBA Draft Combine“Hi guys, Everything is good! It is understood that I am officially under contract in Hong Kong, so I could not be at the PBA Draft Combine,” Standhardinger posted on his Twitter account.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“My agent has already informed PBA officials in advance. Looking forward to seeing you all at Draft Day!” he wrote.Standhardinger, who is projected to be this year’s top overall pick, is currently in Hong Kong practicing with the Long Lions. Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Read Next UAAP Starting 5: Week 7 Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Gamescenter_img Christian Standhardinger. Photo from Fiba.comAfter skipping the Draft Combine on Monday, Christian Standhardinger assured that he will attend the 2017 PBA Rookie Draft on Sunday.The Fil-German big man shared that he had already notified the league of his absence in the mandatory combine weeks ahead due to his commitments with his ABL team Hong Kong.ADVERTISEMENT The draft will take place at Robinsons Place Manila. Kin of Misamis Oriental hero cop to get death benefits, award — PNP Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort LATEST STORIES MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

first_imgREAD: Myers to beef up Gilas in Jones CupCompeting in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from August 19 to 30, Ferrer, together with Ray Parks, are shooting for their third gold medal, which will allow them to tie Rommel Adducul for the second-most haul in men’s basketball.Tolomia, meanwhile, is playing on his first SEA Games after previously helping the Philippines claim gold in the 2016 SEABA Cup, while Cruz will be making his national team debut in an international competition.The three acknowledge the obvious disadvantage of trotting out a youthful squad, but the squad will be fighting for pride to extend the Philippines’ dominance in the regional tilt.READ: Seeing growth of hoops in the region, Parks knows Gilas has to be ready“There’s a pressure because we’re champions here. We can’t lose,” said Ferrer. “But although we have a young squad, we’re familiar with each other so adjustment won’t be an issue. We know how to play off one another and we all know how to win.”Tolomia added: “It’s going to be a tough competition for us because the other countries will be bringing in their best players. Though we know we could learn a lot from them, we also know that we’ll give nothing less but our best.”“It’s going to be coach Chot’s system which will help us get the wins,” said Cruz. “It doesn’t matter if we’re undersized and they’re bigger, it’s the system where we’ll lean on and we’ll do everything just to fight for our country.” Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netWhen coach Chot Reyes announced his 12-man lineup for the 2017 Seaba Championship, he pointed out three names whom he felt were the toughest cuts .“If I had to choose 15, Kevin Ferrer, Carl Bryan Cruz, and Mike Tolomia would definitely be there,” he said then.ADVERTISEMENT “I didn’t lose hope. Coach Chot talked to us and said that he has plans for us. So when there’s an opportunity to play, we’ll play,” said the Ginebra rookie.READ: More woes hound Gilas PH Same is the case with the FEU duo of Tolomia and Cruz, as they look at this break as their chance to show what they have been doing in the Gilas practices.“It’s time for us to prove that we’re worthy of our spot in that lineup,” said the cat-quick Tolomia.The bruiser Cruz added: “It means a lot. After all the hard work I put, making this roster makes me more motivated to give my best for the team.”ADVERTISEMENT Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games China furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong But now, all three will have their chance to shine donning the national team colors as Ferrer, Cruz, and Tolomia were named to the Gilas Pilipinas squad seeing action in the 2017 Southeast Asian Games.READ: Kobe Paras future of Gilas, says Reyes FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“It’s an honor to be a part of this team and represent our country. We promise that we’ll give our best wherever we play,” said Ferrer.The lanky UST forward said that his faith never waned, believing when one door closes, another one opens. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucena Weighing game: Horn still over 7 pounds overweight for battle LATEST STORIES Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Cayetano to unmask people behind ‘smear campaign’ vs him, SEA Games What ‘missteps’? View commentslast_img read more