first_img(Visited 408 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Secularists put too much hope on some aspects of Earth-like exoplanets, but sometimes reality keeps their imaginations in check.Titanic blunder: One of the most extreme cases of astrobiological folly in recent memory is the public presentation of Titan as a more habitable place for humans than Mars. Space.com and Fox News Science, fully aware that it’s -290°F at the surface of this large moon of Saturn, joined in this imagination fest, lured by the thought of free energy. Cassini scientist Amanda Hendrix and co-author Yuk Yang look at all the free oil and wind power down there, as if that’s all that matters. No food, no oxygen, and a billion miles of space travel are minor matters to these speculators who will never have to be held accountable for their ideas, since they will be long gone by the time humans leap the technological hurdles to even get there, let alone be able to land without freezing solid instantly. Besides those challenges, future settlers had better not bring or manufacture oxygen, otherwise with all the hydrocarbons present in the atmosphere, the settlement will go kablooey first time someone lights a match.Artwork for one of Cassini’s 127 Titan encountersBlunders like this come from focusing on one aspect of habitability to the exclusion of others. Titan orbits within Saturn’s magnetosphere 95% of the time, where it is exposed to high-energy charged particles. Lacking a magnetic field of its own, it is exposed to the deadly solar wind the other 5% of the time. Furthermore, Titan’s atmosphere is poisoned with acetylene, benzene and other toxins. It has smog, obscuring any view of the stars from the surface. And it is so deadly cold, any life form not continuously heated would die instantly. The ice on Titan is so cold, in fact, it behaves like solid rock. The only places for boat recreation are lakes of liquid methane and ethane. Titan does not seem like a fun place for humans to go, even with all that free oil. The occasional speculations about microbes on Titan seem highly unrealistic. If evolutionists cannot figure out how microbes came into being on an ideal planet like Earth, how can they imagine it happening on a world where all the water is locked up in ice?TRAPPIST Entrapment: A few weeks ago, the news media hyped the TRAPPIST-1 star as a place to look for life. Its seven planets, three within the ‘habitable zone’ where liquid water might exist, excited the imaginations of astrobiologists leaking their hopeful dreams to the press. Now, there’s bad news. Mike Wall reports on Space.com, “The potentially Earth-like planets in the TRAPPIST-1 system may not be so conducive to life after all, two new studies report.” The onslaught of flares and outbursts from the parent star likely destroyed the atmospheres of all these planets, if they have or had them. Harvard astronomer Avi Loeb says with humorous understatement, “This would hurt the chances of life forming or persisting.” The blessings we enjoy on Earth stand out in this excerpt:But it gets worse. Because the TRAPPIST-1 system is so tightly packed, the star’s magnetic field has likely connected with those of the planets, allowing stellar-wind particles to flow directly onto the worlds’ atmospheres, the researchers found. This has probably caused atmospheric degradation, and the worlds may even have lost their air entirely.“The Earth’s magnetic field acts like a shield against the potentially damaging effects of the solar wind,” study leader Cecilia Garraffo of the CfA said in the same statement. “If Earth were much closer to the sun and subjected to the onslaught of particles like the TRAPPIST-1 star delivers, our planetary shield would fail pretty quickly.”The type of star matters to habitability, Phys.org emphasizes. Having studied the destructive power of red dwarf stars, known for their flaring behavior, one co-author cautioned, “our work and the work of our colleagues shows we should also target as many stars as possible that are more like the Sun.”The shooting gallery: A paper in PLoS One examines the biological effects of exposure to space outside the Earth’s protective shield. It begins, “During interplanetary flights in the near future, a human organism will be exposed to prolonged periods of a hypomagnetic field that is 10,000 times weaker than that of Earth’s.” The authors are primarily interested in the source of the magnetic sense in humans and animals, but they acknowledge that “Nonspecific magnetoreception could be of fundamental importance in terms of health risks caused by a chronic EM exposure of humans and biosphere.”This would hurt the chances of life forming or persisting.No fans for popular stars: Another article on Phys.org indicates that “cool stars favoured by exoplanet hunters” are unlikely to be habitable, even though more abundant than solar-type stars. Because an exoplanet’s habitable zone would be closer into a cool star, it would be exposed to coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at closer range. NASA Goddard scientists evaluated one such star (V374 Pegasi) and thought about conditions on a planet in the habitable zone, even if the planet had a magnetic shield:When a CME impacts a planet, it compresses the planet’s magnetosphere, a protective magnetic bubble shielding the planet. Extreme CMEs can exert enough pressure to shrink a magnetosphere so much that it exposes a planet’s atmosphere, which can then be swept away from the planet. This could in turn leave the planetary surface and any potential developing lifeforms exposed to harmful X-rays from the nearby host star….“While these cool stars may be the most abundant, and seem to offer the best prospects for finding life elsewhere, we find that they can be a lot more dangerous to live around due to their CMEs” said Marc Kornbleuth, a graduate student involved in the project.The results suggest that an exoplanet would need a magnetic field ten to several thousand times that of Earth’s to shield their atmosphere from the cool star’s CMEs. As many as five impacts a day could occur for planets near the ACS [Astrospherical Current Sheet], but the rate decreases to one every other day for planets with an inclined orbit.Law of mass action: What if Earth were 50% bigger? Live Science says it would preclude our space program. It already takes 80-90% of the mass of a rocket just for propellant to launch humans into space. At some point, as the mass of a planet grows, it reaches a point of diminishing returns, making escape impossible. Astronaut Donald Pettit used the Tsiolkovsky Rocket Equation to figure out that limit. If earth were 50% more massive, he says, space travel with current rocket technology would be impossible. He didn’t figure what effects the greater mass would have on life, including human life, which would be correspondingly weighed down by excess gravity. If you feel sluggish now, think of carrying that extra weight! This would put a damper on the Olympics.Good news, bad news: Two guys, Batista and Sloan, worked out at the University of Oxford. At The Conversation, they say, “We worked out what it would take to wipe out all life on a planet – and it’s good news for alien hunters.” The good news is that tardigrades (tiny but hardy animals) would probably survive extinction-level events, such as asteroid impacts, supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. The bad news is that humans and sentient beings probably would not. So unless one believes tardigrades are capable of radio astronomy, SETI should not be aiming telescopes at exoplanets that have been hit recently. There’s a lesson for habitability, too: planets subject to frequent bombardment by such terrors probably should not be considered habitable, even if all the other factors are present.What is nature? A product of design or chance? Photo by David CoppedgeDo you get the impression that Earth might be so unique, so special, that it might be designed? (see 7/10/17). Why is that not a scientific conclusion? Must we force all observations into a materialistic, purposeless worldview? Our scientist of the month didn’t think so.last_img read more

first_imgThe No. 4-ranked McIlroy missed the cut at the U.S. Open last month and hasn’t had a victory in an injury-hit 2017 so far.Jon Rahm, playing in the same group as McIlroy, shot 67 and was a stroke behind leader Daniel Im (67) midway through Day 2.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsThe British Open starts July 20 at Royal Birkdale. LATEST STORIES MOST READ View comments Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucena #KicksStalker: Throwback to Jordan’s baseball days with J9 ‘Baseball Glove’ Nikki Valdez rushes self to ER due to respiratory tract infection Rory McIlroy hits his second shot on the 18th hole during the final round of play at the Travelers Championship golf tournament Sunday, June 25, 2017, in Cromwell, Conn. (Brad Horrigan/Hartford Courant via AP)PORTSTEWART, Northern Ireland — Defending champion Rory McIlroy looks set to miss the cut at the Irish Open in a blow to his preparation for the British Open.McIlroy shot 1-over 73 Friday in his second round over the links at Portstewart and was 1 over for the tournament, which he is hosting to benefit his foundation. He was four shots off the predicted cut mark.ADVERTISEMENT Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend China furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’last_img read more

first_imgLiverpool striker Salah named Caf African Football Player of the Yearby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool striker Mohamed Salah has been named Caf African Football Player of the Year for the second time in a row.Salah saw off competition from Reds teammate Sadio Mane and Arsenal’s Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang to scoop the award yet again.Salah enjoyed a stellar 2018 as he led the goalscoring charts at home and in Europe.He netted 44 times in all competitions last season.And Salah’s fine form saw Liverpool end up in the Champions League final, which they lost to Real Madrid.Salah also represented Egypt at their first-ever World Cup in Russia. About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgWASHINGTON – Most American families grew richer between 2013 and 2016, but the wealthiest households pulled even further ahead, worsening the nation’s massive disparities in wealth and income.The median net worth of all American families rose 16 per cent last year from 2013 to $97,300, according to a Federal Reserve survey released Wednesday. The median is the point where half of families fall below and half above. That’s the first gain for middle class households since the recession upended the economy nearly a decade ago.The figures echo data released earlier this month from the Census Bureau, which also showed middle-class incomes rising. Since 2015, the economic recovery’s benefits have been spread broadly, to nearly all income levels and racial and ethnic groups. But those gains arrived after the first five years of the recovery, when higher-earning households reaped most of the benefits. A low and falling unemployment rate has helped push up pay, while rising home prices have restored some wealth to middle income families.Even with the improvement, the Fed’s report, known as the Survey of Consumer Finances , starkly illustrates the depth of the nation’s wealth and income gaps. The disparities exist along lines of income, race and ethnicity, and between cities and rural dwellers.“You’re seeing a continuing pulling apart in the wealth and income data,” said Elise Gould, senior economist at the Economic Policy Institute.It also points to why so many Americans remain frustrated with the economy: On many measures, most families still haven’t fully recovered from the 2008-2009 downturn. In fact, the median measures for wealth and income still trail their 2001 levels.Lael Brainard, a Fed policymaker, raised concerns in a speech Tuesday that long-running inequalities may hobble U.S. economic growth. Greater concentrations of wealth and income could slow consumer spending, which accounts for about two-thirds of economic activity, because richer households typically save a larger proportion of a pay raise or other income gain than middle- and lower-income ones do.The Fed’s survey found that even as median net worth climbed 16 per cent, average net worth rose more quickly, by 26 per cent to $692,100. Those differences between the median and average figures mostly reflect stronger gains at the top of the income scale. Net worth includes the value of housing, stocks, mutual funds and other savings minus mortgages and other debts.Black and Hispanic families reported large wealth gains, but wealth gaps along racial lines barely narrowed. Median wealth for an African-American family was $17,600 last year, up 29 per cent from 2013. That’s a much bigger gain than the 17 per cent increase for whites.Yet median wealth for white families last year was $171,000, ten times that for blacks and roughly eight times that for Latinos.Median wealth for the richest 10 per cent of all families jumped 40 per cent in the past three years to $1.63 million.The 1 per cent richest families now hold nearly 39 per cent of U.S. wealth, up from 36.3 per cent in 2013, the Fed said. The bottom 90 per cent of families now own just 22.8 per cent of the nation’s wealth, down from 33.2 per cent in 1989.Similar patterns appear in the report’s section on incomes. Latino families reported a 15 per cent gain in median income to $38,500, while median income for African-Americans rose 10 per cent to $35,400. Median incomes for whites rose only 6 per cent, but were still much higher at $61,200.One reason more families are finally regaining some wealth is that home prices have risen steadily since 2012. Average housing wealth — the value of a home, minus mortgages and other debt — rose 20 per cent last year from 2016. That followed a slight drop in home values in the previous three years.Meanwhile, for those Americans who own stocks, the average value of their portfolios increased 23.4 per cent from 2013 to 2016. That followed an 18.2 per cent increase in the preceding three years, when average home values were falling.For the 10 per cent richest Americans, the average value of their stock holdings jumped nearly 37 per cent to $1.37 million.The Fed also broke down their measures by where families live. For families living in cities, median income increased 10 per cent, while those outside cities saw an increase of just 2 per cent.___Follow Chris Rugaber on Twitter at http://Twitter.com/ChrisRugaberlast_img read more

first_imgPutrajaya: Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong on Tuesday defended Singapore’s proposed law to fight “online falsehoods,” but his Malaysian counterpart Mahathir Mohamad warned that anti-fake news laws were a double-edged sword that could be abused by governments to stay in power. The two leaders were speaking after annual talks Tuesday aimed at resolving disputes over maritime boundaries, airspace management and the price of water that had strained ties since Mahathir’s alliance swept to power in elections last May. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USLee said many countries including France, Germany and Australia have legislation to combat fake news. Singapore took nearly two years to deliberate on the issue before the government unveiled a bill in parliament last week to combat fake news, he said. The law allows the government to remove online content it deems as false and includes a jail term of up to 10 years and hefty fines. “This is the problem of fake news and deliberate false statement being proliferated online. It is a serious problem which confronts many countries,” Lee said at a joint news conference. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls”Singapore is not the only one which has taken legislation on this issue. The French has done so, the Germans have done so. The Australians have just done so, something similar and very draconian. The British are also thinking of doing this as well. So Singapore had to do this and we had a long process… finally we have this bill and it will be debated in the house and I hope eventually it will become legislation,” he said. Lee rejected criticisms from rights groups such as Reporters Without Borders which had voiced fear the law could further stifle free speech in Singapore, which already has stern laws on public protests and dissent. “They criticized many things about Singapore’s media management but what we have done have worked for Singapore. And it is our objective to continue to do things that will work for Singapore. And I think (the new law) will be a significant step forward in this regard,” he added. Mahathir, however, said his government will repeal Malaysia’s law against fake news as it promised. An earlier effort to do so was blocked by the opposition-led Senate but the government is expected to push it through again. “For us, we need to learn how to handle such fake news. When we have laws that prevent people from airing their views, then we are afraid the government may abuse the law as it has happened in the last government,” Mahathir said. “We do not want any government, whether this or succeeding governments, to make use of this law in order to tell and create fake news in order to sustain themselves. Of course it will be difficult to handle, but we believe we can accept the challenges and we can handle that.”last_img read more

first_imgKolkata: A couple was found dead inside their home at Agarpara in North 24 Parganas on Friday morning.According to local residents, Amar Mondal rented the ground floor of a house at Agarpara approximately six months ago. He used to live with his wife Brinda and their three-and-a-half-year-old daughter. A source said the couple had frequent arguments. On several occasions, Mondal family’s landlord had to intervene to stop them. It is suspected a third person is involved in the case. On Friday, the private tutor of the Mondal’s daughter arrived in the morning. When she knocked on the door many times but no one opened it, she immediately informed the landlord and neighbours. Neighbours broke the door and found Amar and Brinda dead. Khardah police station was informed. Police rushed the couple to Sagar Dutta Hospital in Kamarhati where doctors declared them brought dead. It is suspected that Amar murdered Brinda and later committed suicide. Police recovered a suicide note by Amar. He said in the letter he was going to the other world with his wife. Some neighbours claimed Brinda had an extra marital affair. Ananda Roy, Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP), Zone II of Barrackpore Police said: “The bodies have been sent for autopsy. A suicide note has been recovered. No police complaint has been lodged in this regard.”last_img read more

first_imgGhaziabad: In a tragic incident, two youths were killed when a speeding Mahindra pickup truck rammed into their car from behind at elevated road in Indirapuram area of Ghaziabad on early Thursday morning. Cops said that the truck driver was arrested later in the evening as he fled the spot, leaving the truck behind, fromthe spot. According to police, the incident occurred around 5 am at Hindon elevated road when the duo of victims were travelling from Raj Nagar extension to Delhi. The deceased were identified as Akshay (24), a resident of Shalimar garden in Sahibabad area of Ghaziabad and Karan (22), resident of Laxmi Nagar in delhi. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murder”The information was conveyed around 5:15 am by a passerby who reported the incident to police. A police team immediately rushed to the spot and took the victims to max hospital in Indirapuram where both the victims succumbed to injuries while getting treatment. Both the victims received severe head injuries in the incident” said Sandeep Kumar Singh, Station House officer of Indirapuram police station. The officer further said that the truck driver was later arrested from Indirapuram area in the evening while a case under relevant sections Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsof IPC has been registered against him. “Following the incident, police registered a case under sections 279 (punishment for Rash driving), 304A (causing death by negligence) and 427 (mischief causing damage to the amount of fifty rupees) of Indian Penal Code. Police have seized the truck while the accused driver will be produced before the court and will be sent to the jail” added Singh. Police said that the accused driver has been identified as Pramod kumar (28), a native of Gonda district of Uttar Pradesh. Kumar was moving towards Ghazipur area in delhi when the incident took place. Meanwhile, deceased Akshay’s uncle Pradeep Maheshwari told Millennium Post that Akshay had went to a his friend’s place in Raj Nagar area to attend a party. “Akshay’s father had also expired in a road accident around three years ago while his mother was looking after the family and was working at a private company in Noida. In February he had undergone a tuberculosis surgery and got discharged from the hospital after getting treatment. We are saddened with his demise and want strict actions to be initiated against the accused” said Maheshwari.last_img read more

first_imgNEW DELHI: PC Chako, All India Congress Committee in-charge of Delhi, on Thursday said his party will have a direct fight with the BJP in the Lok Sabha elections in Delhi and asserted that the possibility of a triangular contest is “slowly disappearing” in the national capital. The senior Congress leader also raised doubts about AAP chief Arvind Kejriwal’s seriousness in defeating the BJP. Chacko said the Congress was getting a good response after the party fielded its candidates for all the seven Lok Sabha seats in Delhi, which goes to polls on May 12. Also Read – Arms supplier arested from RajasthanDelhi Pradesh Congress Committee (DPCC) on Thursday introduced its candidates before the media at its party office here. Talking to reporters, Chacko said he has “doubts” about Kejriwal’s seriousness to defeat the Bhartitya Janata Party in Delhi. “Earlier, we thought there is a triangular fight in Delhi, but (the possibility) of a triangular fight is disappearing slowly in Delhi. We have a direct fight with BJP in Delhi,” the party’s general secretary in-charge of Delhi said. Also Read – Water supply disruption likely in some areasAsked about the possibility of any alliance between the Congress and the Aam Aadmi Party even after both parties announced its candidates, Chacko said that it is now a closed chapter. “It is difficult to get the AAP into confidence because we have doubts about Kejriwal’s intension…without any reason, he (Kejriwal) stepped back that is why we still have doubt about him being serious in defeating the BJP,” the Congress leader said. Asserting that there will be no split of anti-BJP votes in Delhi, he said in the entire country, there is fight between the Congress and BJP. “Anti-BJP votes will come to Congress. In the entire country, there is fight between Rahul Gandhi and Narendra Modi and in view of this, there will be no split of votes,” Chacko also said. Congress president and North-east candidate Sheila Dikshit said that the Congress candidates are familiar with the people of Delhi as they have been serving them for past many years in various capacities.last_img read more

first_imgWhen we think about organising precarious “gig” workers, the task seems biblical. Low pay and no benefits that accrue to gig workers are worsened by the uncertainty of a position where you can only work to deliver something specifically demanded by consumers and at a premium you are often powerless to control. App companies misclassify workers as independent contractors rather than employees in order to pass on all of the maintenance and capital costs, aside from web work and marketing, to the workers, avoiding personnel benefit and equipment costs that are routine for regular employers. Conditions seem to cry out a union. A recent “strike” by Uber drivers in Los Angeles illustrates the kind of problem we deal with when we discuss gig workers and their ability to fight for better conditions. The company had triggered the strike by increasing its percentage of the fare, thereby decreasing drivers’ pay. In response, the drivers turned off the Uber application on their phone. Stated more plainly, they went on strike by simply not responding to any calls or inducements to drive. Did it work? Who knows? How would any of us, whether organisers, curious observers, or company officials, know how to measure the number of drivers protesting in this way versus those who just decided not to drive on any given day or got ticked-off and responded to Lyft instead? ACORN tried a similar approach in the early 1970s when we were fighting increases by the Arkla Gas Company in central Arkansas. Our “Turn Off Arkla Day!” action got a bit of press, as the Uber drivers did in Los Angeles. But in both cases, the company yawned since there was no way to measure whether the strike affected their cash flow. Organising gig workers can be challenging, but there’s some good work going on for bicycle delivery drivers in Europe, where companies like Uber Eats, Deliveroo, and others have become ubiquitous. Last fall, one of ACORN’s affiliates organised a meeting in Brussels that brought together union activists interested in organising European bicycle delivery drivers with fledgeling groups of drivers from a dozen countries including the UK, the Netherlands, and Germany. That meeting highlighted several active organising projects: – Bike Workers Advocacy Project (BWAP), a new group seeking to organise cycling workers and, eventually, lead to some kind of unionisation or union-style representation. Drivers at Postmates and Caviar in New York City and some bicycle shops seemed to be stirring the pot in 2018, but nothing seems to have emerged formally to date. – Bike delivery workers at Foodora and Dilveroo in Germany have raised issues about low wages and their independent contractor situation while advocating for a union. – In 2016, London gig workers for delivery services Deliveroo and Uber Eats organised protests and strikes for higher wages. There was also an outcry in Philadelphia when a rider for Caviar was killed while working. – Legal action has managed to win back employment rights, such as a recent ruling in Spain that declared that a Deliveroo rider was, in fact, an employee and not an independent contractor, as the company claimed. Caviar is in mandatory arbitration in California on the same issue. Just as importantly, riders in London struck for three days in 2018 and joined with striking McDonalds’s workers to demand higher wages, largely organised by a chapter of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). While these examples seem promising, unions clearly lack any real commitment to organise these workers, and the workers have limited leverage. David Chu, who directs the European Organising Center, a joint project between European unions and the US-based Change to Win federation, told me recently that he hears a lot of talk about organising gig workers but sees little action in that direction. Serious organising efforts in the United States have been contradictory and are embryonic at best. Uber in New York City and San Francisco reacted to organising efforts by attempting to co-opt the organisations into agreeing that the workers were not employees in exchange for consultation rights on rule changes and other issues like receiving tips. More concerted efforts to create a mini-National Labor Relations Board representation mechanism were launched at the municipal level in Seattle, but the organising effort is currently mired in litigation over pre-emption by the National Labor Relations Act and the question of employee status. Local efforts reflect the way companies keep changing their practices, as Marielle Benchehboune, coordinator of ACORN’s affiliate, ReAct, noted recently in Forbes. “What will make the difference,” she suggested, is workers organising “on the transnational scale.” Perhaps her analysis is correct. Perhaps a rare global organising plan could create enough pressure and leverage among these competing companies that could weld a workers’ movement together from the disparate pieces of independent worker mobilisations that are cropping up around the world. Given the challenges, how much should we invest in organising gig workers? Labour economists in the US caution that despite all of the hype from Silicon Valley and even some labour officials about the emerging gig economy, it involves a very small percentage of the workforce. I heard something similar 15 years ago when I asked a leader of the Indian National Trade Union Congress if they were doing anything to organise call centre workers in India. He answered that they estimated that there were 30,000 such workers, but there were 450 million workers in India at the time and hardly nine per cent were organised. He then shrugged. That’s all he said, but we got the message. There’s much to be done in organising the unorganised; resources and capacity are always restrained, whether in India, Europe or North America. Is that a reason for not finding ways to organise workers who are attempting on their own to find justice in their jobs? Or is it just another rationale for doing little or nothing? The one thing that seems clear is that if unions are going to be relevant to the modern workforce and the irregular and precarious forms of work that are being created by technology married to avarice, we must debate and address these challenges. It may be difficult, but unions and organisers need to devise practical strategies that allow workers to organise, win, and build enough power to force companies to adapt and change. IPA (Courtesy: People’s World The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

Freshman goalie Matt Tomkins blocks a shot during a game against Minnesota Duluth Nov. 2 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 4-2.Credit: Kelly Roderick / For The LanternThe Ohio State men’s ice hockey team (4-4-0) held on to an early lead and handed the No. 20 Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs a 4-2 loss.After the opening period Saturday, the Buckeyes led, 2-0, off goals from senior forward Alex Szczechura and sophomore forward Tyler Lundey.Although junior forward Max McCormick widened the gap with another Buckeye goal early, Duluth (4-3-1) made it a one-goal game by the end of the second period with goals from freshman forward Alex Iafallo and junior forward Caleb Herbert.The Buckeyes were the only team to score in the third period, with an unassisted empty-net goal by junior forward Ryan Dzingel with 33 seconds left in the game.Dzingel said Wednesday the games against Duluth were going to be fast-paced because the Minnesota team “likes to get up and down the ice.”Szczechura said the team managed to hold its own against the Bulldogs’ speed.“Our team as a whole can definitely handle a fast pace as a style of hockey we want to play, and tonight I think we played a good game — a very up-tempo game and very physical — and I think it helped us,” Szczechura said Saturday following the win.Junior forward Nick Oddo said sticking with the fundamentals of the game was what led to the Buckeyes’ victory.“Just keeping things simple,” Oddo said. “Coach (Steve Rohlik) always preaches to push the puck north, get it forward, chips, get pressure on their (defense), and I think doing those little things helped us.”Freshman Matt Tomkins played in the net for OSU for the full 60 minutes, saving a career-high 39 shots.The first game of the series was played Friday at the Schottenstein Center, where the Buckeyes fell to the Bulldogs, 3-1.“I can’t fault our effort,” Rohlik said. “We made mistakes, and the mistakes we made ended up in our net.”Despite losing Friday, Rohlik said it was one of the Buckeyes’ best performances so far this season.“To be honest with you, I think we probably played a more complete game (Friday),” Rohlik said Saturday. “I thought we played in spurts tonight, I thought we were very good early, but they kind of took over maybe in the middle there.”The Buckeyes, in the midst of a seven-game homestand, are slated to return to action Friday against Niagara at 7:05 p.m with the two-game series against the Purple Eagles concluding Saturday. read more