first_imgTOKYO (AP) — The president of the Tokyo Olympic organizing committee says he will not resign despite pressure on him to do so after making derogatory comments earlier in the week about women. The controversy surrounding gaffe-prone former Japanese prime minister Yoshiro Mori is one more problem the postponed Olympics really don’t need as organizers and the IOC try to pull off the games in the midst of a pandemic. They are scheduled to open on July 23. Mori says “I have been working hard and helped devotedly for seven years. I will not be stepping down.” The International Olympic Committee says it will not urge Mori to resign.last_img read more

first_imgThis Sunday, 82 students and faculty from Notre Dame’s Colleges of Engineering and Arts and Letters, as well as the Robinson Community Learning Center, will celebrate the fourth annual National Robotics Week by displaying their robots in an open exhibition at the Stepan Center. Laurel Riek, assistant professor of computer science and engineering, is organizing the second annual Notre Dame event. Riek also organized Notre Dame’s first National Robotics Week exhibition last year.  Riek said the expectation last year was to have a very simple event, but the attendance was much higher than anticipated. “Last year, the plan was to have the event be a one-day, robot-themed science museum to get the public excited about it,” Riek said. “We ended up having over 600 people come to see the robots, and we got an overwhelmingly positive response from the community.” Riek said the event grew out of an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort she implemented in her computer science and engineering course, Autonomous Mobile Robots.  “In 2012 I worked with Krista Hoefle, an associate professor of art over at Saint Mary’s. Her art students and my computer science students created robots for the event together,” Riek said. “I realized from that collaboration how art is a great way of engaging the public with robotics. We can design all these fantastic algorithms for our robots, but by enhancing them a little bit with art and making them be interactive, people can start to appreciate all the great engineering going on under the hood.” Jay Brockman, the Associate Dean of Engineering for Educational Programs, said the robotics event is a key initiative in fostering community engagement.  “It fits into a grand vision of where we would like to see the college of engineering and the University be in five or so years, and that is to see a much better partnership between the University and the South Bend community,” Brockman said. Brockman also said the upcoming exhibition is important for engendering interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines.  “A high school student often says, ‘I do okay at math and science but I want to do something that interests people, so I’m not going to major in engineering or science,’” Brockman said. “But by seeing things like Dr. Riek’s work with robots applied to medicine, as well as all the entertaining robots that will be at the event, it shows how interesting engineering is in a way that the community can really relate to.” A variety of robots will be on display and interacting with visitors at the event. For example, graduate students Mike Gonzales and Tariq Iqbal have designed a disk jockey robot. “One of the robots that we are building is a DJ that will not only be playing music but will also sense and then judge how expressive and engaged participants are,” Gonzales said.  In addition to the robots themselves, students will discuss some of the underlying mathematics. Graduate student Maryam Moosaei will be demonstrating the facial tracking and pain detection algorithms she and other students in Riek’s lab are using to create more realistic patient mannequins for training doctors and nurses.  There will also be robotics-themed prizes raffled off at the event and T-shirts will be sold with all proceeds going to the Donors Choose fund to benefit local Saint Joseph County school teachers, Riek said.  Two of the graduate students in Riek’s lab, Maria O’Connor and Cory Hayes, plan to make even the raffle robotics-related, Hayes said.  Hayes said the raffle tickets will be accepted by a small robot designed to look like R2-D2 from the Star Wars movies. “We’re going to have a little R2-D2 robot that will wheel around beeping and accepting passports for the raffle, stopping to tell jokes every time someone submits one,” Hayes said.  The exhibition will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. It is free and open to the public.last_img read more

first_imgBy the start of her freshman year at Saint Mary’s, Elise deSomer (’17) said she knew she would be a professional photographer. DeSomer started her Michiana photography business, Elise Imagery, as a high school blog and has since transformed it into a full-fledged career specializing in portraits and unique artwork.  Having graduated from the College as the co-valedictorian of the class of 2017 and having been the recipient of departmental awards in art and English literature, Elise said she attributes much of her confidence to her Saint Mary’s education.  “I’m definitely not the same person I was before Saint Mary’s. I was very timid and non-assertive, which simply doesn’t work for photographing people. Saint Mary’s helped me gain the leadership skills necessary for directing clients during photo shoots,” deSomer said in an email.  “The intensity of art classes at SMC prepped me well for the fast turnaround clients expect for photography in the digital age. … Being an art major taught me how to conceptualize an idea in my head and then form it into reality.”  Like many other successful Belles, she said, deSomer received some help along the way.  “I never met a [Saint Mary’s] faculty member who didn’t change my life for the better in one way or another,” she said.  DeSomer credits Professor Krista Hoefle’s SISTAR grant creative research project in Object-Oriented Ontology, as well as advice from Aaron Moe of the English department and Douglas Tyler in the art department as integral influencers on her “direction in life as an artist and a person.”DeSomer’s work week is split between shooting and editing days, the latter taking about one to 30 days, depending on the scope of the project. “On shooting days, I wake up, sort and pack gear, and go wherever the client requests. My favorite part about shooting days is the spontaneity, the break from routine,” deSomer said.  She edits her work at home, starting the day at 8 a.m. with a cup of calming chamomile tea for focus and a brief meditation.  Daily migraines from a minor traumatic brain injury last fall keep deSomer from working on the computer for more than 40 minutes at time, so she manages this obstacle by interspersing her editing with housework and relaxation exercises.DeSomer said she works to create an environment that celebrates the intricacies of the human person.  She finds inspiration for portrait shoots from her clients, as well as from the landscape of the shooting space.“Many clients know exactly what they want, so we’ll make a collaborative Pinterest board to help us keep a clear creative vision,” deSomer said.  “We might have poses planned out carefully and then scrap them all in favor of spontaneous poses that fit better with the vibe of a location.”In the future, deSomer said she hopes to buy her own house, complete with lots of acreage for outdoor portraits.  She also said she hopes to branch out from portrait photography, and tackle more conceptual fine art photography and digital art for exhibitions.  Elise Imagery is expecting the launch of an entirely new website and online booking system, as well as hand-bound books for clients.Although deSomer graduated this past summer, she said she still feels very tied to the Saint Mary’s community.  “I never truly comprehended the reality of the ‘once a Belle, always a Belle’ mantra until after graduation. … As an alumna, I still turn to my fellow Belles when I need strong confident women to model for photographic projects,” she said.  DeSomer said she feels cautious using the word “sisterhood” to define the unique bond that Saint Mary’s students cultivate over their four years on campus, as she maintains that it can sound unwelcoming towards the LGBT members of the community.  “Semantics aside, I don’t think I would have found such a supportive network of soul sisters at a co-ed educational institution,” deSomer said.  “I love how Belles look out for each other, and I love looking out for other Belles, even more so now as an alumna.”  In making her love for photography and art marketable, deSomer said she has found a career path that combines her natural skills with her true passions.“Even if you don’t feel like you are good at anything, you absolutely are. You just might need to do some soul searching and hard work to find and develop the skills that will fulfill you professionally and personally,” deSomer said.  “You’re going to do amazing things no matter what. Don’t worry about the future too much. Sometimes you will feel like you are falling instead of flying, but falling is necessary for all the pieces that will fall into place with time, persistence and resilience.”Tags: Elise imagery, photography, SMC alumnalast_img read more

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on July 20, 2014 Star Files Daniel Radcliffe Zero to Sixty When McDonagh was 22, his parents moved back to Ireland, leaving Martin and John in their house in South London. After John left to pursue screenwriting in America, Martin was alone, and he started to write every day. After breakfast each morning, he would sit down at a child’s desk in his bedroom and write with a pencil in a spiral notebook. In nine months, he’d written drafts of seven plays—almost his entire body of work for the stage. (He’s only written one play produced since then, 2010’s A Behanding in Spokane.) Enter Harry Potter When Tony-winning director Michael Grandage wanted to bring Cripple back to the English stage in 2013, Daniel Radcliffe jumped at the chance. “There are so many people who would cut off their left arm to do The Cripple of Inishmaan,” he told Broadway.com. “No pun intended!” Since the play doesn’t specify exactly what is wrong with Billy, Radcliffe had to do his research. “I’ve decided, based on what information you do get from the play, that cerebral palsy was a viable option for what Billy could have had.” He hired a coach with mild cerebral palsy to teach him the physical mechanics of the condition. Up and Running Beauty Queen was followed quickly by the premiere of The Cripple of Inishmaan at the Royal National Theatre in 1996, when McDonagh was just 26. 19-year-old Dublin actor Ruaidhri Conroy played Billy, with Dearbhla Molloy and Anita Reeves as his adopted aunts, Eileen and Kate. The reception was nothing short of ecstatic. “This play will last,” wrote Variety, “And if there’s any justice, the production will, too.” It did—in 1998, Conroy and Molloy reprised their acclaimed roles at the Public Theater in New York. It was revived again in the Big Apple as a collaboration between the Atlantic and the Druid Theater Companies in 2008, and once again, it received raves. View Comments A Slow Starter Fast-forward 37 years: Martin McDonagh was born in England in 1970 to Irish parents (mother, County Sligo; father, County Galway) who had left home looking for a better life. Following in his older brother John’s footsteps, Martin dropped out of school at 16 to be a writer, which basically meant living on the dole, watching movies and TV and reading books that John brought home, according to The New Yorker. He’d hold down jobs…but just long enough to be eligible for the dole again. On the surface, Irish playwright Martin McDonagh and British stage and screen star Daniel Radcliffe aren’t the most likely pair. After all, McDonagh was the enfant terrible of the British theater scene, and author of some of the most biting, violent plays on stage today—meanwhile, Radcliffe made his name as the star of the (mostly) family-friendly Harry Potter series. But these two talents have found a natural fit in The Cripple of Inishmaan, McDonagh’s play about a disabled Irish boy named Billy (Radcliffe) in the remote Aran Islands. Billy is determined to break out of his dull, tedious life by landing a role in the film being made on a nearby island of Inishmore. Read on for a look at the play’s humble beginnings in Ireland to its Broadway debut at the Cort Theatre on April 20. Related Shows Billy’s a Hit Radcliffe joined a stellar cast of Irish actors, including Gillian Hanna and Ingrid Craigie as his adopted aunties and newcomer Sarah Greene as Helen, the feisty object of Billy’s desire. When the new production opened June 18, 2013 at the Noel Coward Theatre, it earned raves—Ben Brantley of The New York Times said Radcliffe “delivers his finest stage performance to date as a grotesque who fades into the crowd.” Hitting the Big Time McDonagh started sending his plays out to theaters. Most ignored him, but Garry Hynes of Druid Theatre Company in Galway jumped. “I very clearly remember reading [A Skill in Connemara] aloud and throwing myself on the floor in paroxysms of laughter,” she told The New Yorker. Beauty Queen premiered in Galway in 1996; nine months later McDonagh was receiving the Most Promising Playwright Prize at the London Evening Standard Theatre Awards. In 1997, he became the first author since Shakespeare to have four plays on the London stage at the same time. Setting the Scene In 1934, filmmaker Robert J. Flaherty traveled to the remote Aran Islands to make a fictional documentary (yep, that’s a real thing) about the people who lived there, on three islands off the western coast of Ireland: Inishmore, Inishmaan and Inisheer. Flaherty filmed his new project, Man of Aran, on Inishmore, the closest to the Irish mainland. He cast locals to play locals engaged in local activities like fishing, potato farming, and hunting for sharks. Flaherty wasn’t big on accuracy—apparently shark hunting had ended over 50 years earlier—but boy was it pretty. The Cripple of Inishmaan Hopping the Pond What does one do after mounting a wildly successful revival on the London stage? Bring it to Broadway, of course! The entire London cast is making the trip to the Great White Way for a limited engagement at the Cort Theatre. Radcliffe, who was last seen in the Rialto revival of How to Succeed…, may be the most excited of them all. “I hope there never comes a time when I haven’t been to Broadway in more than a few years,” he told Broadway.com. “I just love working here.” How Billy Was Born From McDonagh’s crazy-prolific months came The Cripple of Inishmaan, which he wrote in five weeks. It’s the first of his Aran Islands trilogy (the second is The Lieutenant of Inishmore and the final The Banshees of Inisheer—his only play that hasn’t been staged because McDonagh says “it isn’t any good.”) In Inishmaan, a young crippled orphan named Billy is determined to land a role in the film being made on nearby Inishmore—Robert Flaherty’s Man of Aran. It’s wildly funny and, compared to some of his other works, downright sweet. Cursing 007 & Kissing Jessica Lange As it turns out, McDonagh didn’t care much for the theater when he was starting out. When he went to the Evening Standard Theatre Awards, McDonagh was so nervous that he and his brother got drunk before they went. “Sean Connery came over and told us to shut up and I told him to f*ck off,” McDonagh told The New Yorker. “Apparently I kissed Jessica Lange, but I have no memory of that whatsoever.”last_img read more

first_img Related Shows Gigantic Ready to crave Butterfinger(s)?! Tickets are now on sale to see Max Wilcox, Taylor Louderman, Leslie Kritzer and more in Gigantic off-Broadway. Directed by Scott Schwartz, the musical comedy is part of Vineyard Theatre’s upcoming season and will begin previews at The Acorn Theatre at Theatre Row on November 11. The limited engagement is set to officially open on December 3 and will play through December 20.Getting shipped off to weight-loss camp is hardly Robert’s (Wilcox) idea of the perfect summer, but even he isn’t prepared for what can be lost or gained at Camp Overton, the No. 3 weight-loss camp in Southern Pennsylvania. Gigantic tackles the growing pains of adolescence through the experiences of a bunch of misfit teens forced to find solace in one another as they look—inside and out—for acceptance, a hot make-out session, and the last contraband Butterfinger.The stellar cast will also include Andrew Durand, Katie Ladner, Burke Moses, Ryann Redmond, Jared Loftin, Jennifer Geller, Bonnie Milligan, Larry Owens, Cole Ragsdale, MiMi Scardulla, Nyla Watson and Kalyn West. Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 20, 2015 View Commentslast_img read more

first_imgBy Dialogo October 24, 2014 The grand opening of the modern regional center included a demonstration by the DNCD Canine Unit, detecting narcotics and other evidence hidden in vehicles, containers, homes or any other mechanism used by drug trafficking networks. The director of the National Drug Control Bureau (DNCD) Major General Julio César Souffront Velázquez and the U.S. ambassador to the Dominican Republic James Brewster led the grand opening of modern buildings donated by the United States Southern Command. The buildings will house the Regional Canine Training Center, which will train dogs to detect drugs, explosives, cash and other evidence of organized crime. Since 1998, the United States Embassy has supported the DNCD’s canine program, with an initial donation of 15 drug-sniffing dogs and building kennels at DNCD headquarters. Over the following years, the center acquired more trained dogs and offered training for their handlers. The training center, with space for about 40 persons, includes dormitory rooms, bathrooms, a kitchen, sterilization equipment, recreation areas, air-conditioned classrooms, four covered stations for training the canines, and independent alternative-energy power system, among other amenities. The drug enforcement agency reported that the buildings’ donation was done under the Narcotics and Law Enforcement Agreement, between the Dominican Republic and the United States, which allows for even more efficient efforts against international drug trafficking and money laundering. “The Embassy of the United States will continue to support the DNCD’s canine academy through the purchase of more canines, which will be an important tool in the war on drugs. The canines will help improve civilians’ security in the Dominican Republic and improve security systems in airports, sea ports and along the border. These trained dogs will also protect the efficient flow of commercial trade, promote tourism, and keep drug traffickers from exploiting the country’s critical infrastructure,” said Ambassador Brewster during the ceremony. The grand opening of the modern regional center included a demonstration by the DNCD Canine Unit, detecting narcotics and other evidence hidden in vehicles, containers, homes or any other mechanism used by drug trafficking networks. Since 1998, the United States Embassy has supported the DNCD’s canine program, with an initial donation of 15 drug-sniffing dogs and building kennels at DNCD headquarters. Over the following years, the center acquired more trained dogs and offered training for their handlers. In 2007, working with the DNCD and the Dominican Republic’s National Army, the United States Embassy constructed a canine academy at the historic fortress of La Cumbre. The DNCD assumed control of the training center. With the assistance of the United States Embassy, the first 11 trained dogs in the Dominican Republic graduated with their respective trainers in 2011 from the country’s first canine academy. “The Embassy of the United States will continue to support the DNCD’s canine academy through the purchase of more canines, which will be an important tool in the war on drugs. The canines will help improve civilians’ security in the Dominican Republic and improve security systems in airports, sea ports and along the border. These trained dogs will also protect the efficient flow of commercial trade, promote tourism, and keep drug traffickers from exploiting the country’s critical infrastructure,” said Ambassador Brewster during the ceremony. The US$1.5 million building was built by the Department of Defense and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) through the United States Southern Command. Likewise, the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) contributed US$300,000 to acquire 40 canines, equipment and furniture for the new buildings. The Center is planning on acquiring more canines to meet the DNCD’s requirements. The US$1.5 million building was built by the Department of Defense and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) through the United States Southern Command. Likewise, the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) contributed US$300,000 to acquire 40 canines, equipment and furniture for the new buildings. The Center is planning on acquiring more canines to meet the DNCD’s requirements. The director of the National Drug Control Bureau (DNCD) Major General Julio César Souffront Velázquez and the U.S. ambassador to the Dominican Republic James Brewster led the grand opening of modern buildings donated by the United States Southern Command. The buildings will house the Regional Canine Training Center, which will train dogs to detect drugs, explosives, cash and other evidence of organized crime. In 2007, working with the DNCD and the Dominican Republic’s National Army, the United States Embassy constructed a canine academy at the historic fortress of La Cumbre. The DNCD assumed control of the training center. With the assistance of the United States Embassy, the first 11 trained dogs in the Dominican Republic graduated with their respective trainers in 2011 from the country’s first canine academy. I did not like it The DNCD indicated that experienced instructors will train the Dominican agents, as well as all personnel and the model canines, which come from various Latin American countries, with all the necessary implements to conduct and effective drug enforcement operation. The drug enforcement agency reported that the buildings’ donation was done under the Narcotics and Law Enforcement Agreement, between the Dominican Republic and the United States, which allows for even more efficient efforts against international drug trafficking and money laundering. The training center, with space for about 40 persons, includes dormitory rooms, bathrooms, a kitchen, sterilization equipment, recreation areas, air-conditioned classrooms, four covered stations for training the canines, and independent alternative-energy power system, among other amenities. The DNCD indicated that experienced instructors will train the Dominican agents, as well as all personnel and the model canines, which come from various Latin American countries, with all the necessary implements to conduct and effective drug enforcement operation. last_img read more

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionFor The Daily GazetteNo woman celebrates abortion. No woman wants an abortion the way she wants an ice cream cone or an iPhone X. Legally, there is no question that the new law allows abortion for any reason up to the moment of birth.Gov. Andrew Cuomo can spin it any way he wants, but as an attorney, he knows this is true.Lawmakers could have put language in the law to limit late-term abortions to cases where there is a grave physical health danger to the mother, but they didn’t.Instead, they gave Planned Parenthood exactly what it wanted — an open-ended “health” exception that allows abortion for reasons of age, economics and family circumstances; virtually anything will suffice.Think about that.An unfettered absolute right to abortion for all nine months of pregnancy is now imbedded in New York law.The same fully formed infants that parents excitedly watch on the ultrasound screen kicking their legs and sucking their thumbs can now be legally destroyed at any point in their in utero development. But lawmakers didn’t stop there.They also removed protections in law for infants who might accidentally survive an abortion.Yes, that happens.And yes, our law had previously offered these babies immediate medical attention and gave them all of the legal rights each and every one of us enjoys as a born human being. But no more. Now they can be left to die on the table.  New York’s criminal charge of felony abortion was also wiped off the books by the new law.Human traffickers and domestic abusers are the ones rejoicing here. No longer can they be charged for coerced abortions or attacks intentionally targeting a pregnancy to cause miscarriage.In early February, a pregnant woman and her unborn child were viciously bludgeoned to death in Queens.The district attorney charged the alleged perpetrator with second degree murder and second-degree abortion, but had to drop the abortion charge when he realized the crime no longer exists.As a result, there will never be justice for the death of that very-much-wanted baby.So much for “choice.”Gov. Cuomo has said that New York’s new abortion law is the most aggressive one in the country.He’s right about that.center_img Abortion is a tragedy all the way around.Biologically, that’s because abortion ends the life of a developing human. It’s not a developing carrot or a developing toad.It’s not like losing an appendix or losing your tonsils.It’s the loss of a developing human child.The celebration of New York’s new abortion policy was shameful.The cheering in the Senate chamber, the party at the governor’s mansion and the lighting of state buildings like the Freedom Tower in Manhattan were deeply offensive to many New Yorkers.They are right to be outraged.  And their outrage will not soon be forgotten. It is overly permissive, extreme and dangerous.It will leave in its wake more dead infants and many wounded mothers. It was all about politics and not about the best interests of the people.   Did we need it? Absolutely not.New York already had the highest abortion rate of any state in the country.And that’s a heartbreaking designation, not a celebratory badge of honor.Kathleen M. Gallagher of Schenectady is the director of pro-life activities for the New York State Catholic Conference.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

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first_img56 Watson Street, Camp Hill.Ms Gianniotis said she had noticed older people had lived in the area for about 60 to 70 years and were now moving on.“Young blood is moving in and it gives them an opportunity to live in an entry level home, or plan to do a full renovation,” she said.“Young families are looking to create their dream homes when they can afford it.”She said traditional homes in the area were Queenslanders.“Young buyers are willing to spend around $600,000 to $800,000 and it hasn’t surprised me. There’s still a lot of potential here and a lot of changes in the area will increase the value. The area hasn’t been maximised.” 56 Watson Street, Camp Hill was sold to a family that did a full raise and renovation.Camp Hill is experiencing a mighty rejuvenation with a change in the demographics of the residents in the suburb. Joanna Gianniotis, of Place – Bulimba, said older people were moving out and young families were moving in and renovating homes or building new ones. This had helped to raise the medium price in the past five years.“Young people are drawn to the area because of the easy access to the city,” she said. “There’s no bottlenecks, the streets are wide and the blocks are quite big, about 600sq m.”She sold a property at 56 Watson St, Camp Hill to a family that did a full raise and renovation.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 202056 Watson Street, Camp Hill.last_img read more

first_img33 Greenlinks Crescent, NarangbaTHERE is more to this renovated home at Narangba than meets the eye.The house at 33 Greenlinks Crescent sits diagonally on a 1000sq m block that stretches far beyond its street frontage.It was part of the reason why owners Chris and Clare Bultitude bought the property about three years ago. 33 Greenlinks Crescent, NarangbaThey were looking for a big home that had enough space for Clare’s mother to live with them.Mr Bultitude said this one was perfect because it has dual living.“It is its own little flat inside the house,” he said.He said the large block gave everyone space to spread out while still having enough to cater for guests. 33 Greenlinks Crescent, NarangbaAn open kitchen, living and dining room is at the heart of the home, which flows onto an alfresco patio and separate outdoor entertainment area.There are four bedrooms, the master which has an ensuite and walk-in wardrobe while two others have built-in wardrobes. 33 Greenlinks Crescent, Narangba 33 Greenlinks Crescent, NarangbaThe granny flat has an open plan kitchen, living and dining area with a bedroom and ensuite.Mr Bultitude, who is a builder by trade, said the house was unrecognisable before they renovated it.‘The only thing we haven’t done is the kitchen,” he said. 33 Greenlinks Crescent, NarangbaMore from newsLand grab sees 12 Sandstone Lakes homesites sell in a week21 Jun 2020Tropical haven walking distance from the surf9 Oct 2019“My mother in law has got her own garden and then we’ve got our own garden,” Mr Bultitude said.“We’d have quite a few relatives over from the UK too.” 33 Greenlinks Crescent, Narangba“I’ve just finished the pool recently.“There was a lot of space there, we moved the fence out to make it bigger around the pool.“I’m quite proud that I’ve done that.”The home also has a double garage and is close to parks, walking tracks, schools, shops and public transport.last_img read more