first_imgSagarFour days since the death of Sagar, police have failed to arrest the main culprits of the murder. Accused of theft, teenager Sagar was beaten to death in Gauripur, Mymensingh.The police said that till Thursday they could not nab any of the six accused, including Akkas Ali, the prime suspect in the case.The police, however, arrested two men on Tuesday and Wednesday, Riaz Uddin and Fazlur Rahman respectively. In confessional statements, they told a court that hatchery owner Akkas Ali and his staff Qayyum beat Sagar to death.The four other accused in the case statement are Akkas’ brother Jewel, Hasu Miah, Sattar, and Sohel.Meanwhile, Sagar’s mother alleged that two unknown people came to their home in the slum around 12:00am on Thursday and woke them up from bed. When Sagar’s family asked them who they were, they remained silent and offered them Tk 10,000. But they did not reveal why they were offering the money.Sagar’s family refused to take the money.“They could have pressurised us to withdraw the case after giving the money. I don’t want money in exchange of my son’s life. I want justice,” said Sagar’s mother Hasina Khatun.Sagar’s father Shipon Miah said, “Sagar and I would run the family with our earnings. I’m now worried about how to run the family alone.”Sagar used to collect and sell garbage while his father sells cosmetics.Sagar, 16, was tied to an electric pole and brutally beaten to death at the Gauchhiya Hatchery of Char Sreerampur village in Gauripur, on allegations of stealing a water pump.Police recovered Sagar’s body from a bush near the hatchery on Tuesday.Sagar’s father lodged a case in this incident accusing six named and another six to seven unnamed people.Mymensingh police superintendent Syed Nurul Islam said they have taken the case seriously and vowed to arrest the accused soon.Read more: Teenager tied to electric pole, beaten deadlast_img read more

first_img Share Red, White and Blue show hosts examine the state of school safety in Texas. Discussion topics include violence prevention in regard to spotting mental-health “red flags,” gun safety laws, school security, and more. With guests Haley Carter, Chair of the Mayor’s Commission Against Gun Violence; Texas State Senator Larry Taylor (District 11); and Paul Cordova, Houston Independent School District Chief of Police. Original air date: September 14, 2018.Watch more episodes of Red White and Bluelast_img read more

first_img Share Listen 00:00 /00:49 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Andrew Schneider/Houston Public MediaLizzie Pannill Fletcher (D) and Congressman John Culberson (R) debated Sunday evening at the University of Houston.Republican Congressman John Culberson and Democratic candidate Lizzie Pannill Fletcher are neck and neck in the last days of the race.Culberson is running largely on two messages: Fletcher is too liberal, and he’s the one who brought Houston billions of dollars for disaster relief.“Obviously, there’s going to be a lot of focus on the Harvey recovery and certainly, to his benefit, the role that he played in that recovery as a senior appropriator,” says Tony Essalih, formerly Culberson’s chief of staff, now principal and director of Cornerstone Government Affairs’ Houston office.But Jon Taylor, professor of political science at the University of Saint Thomas, says Fletcher presents a fresh face, while Culberson’s record could actually hurt him. “Name me one major piece of legislation he’s accomplished in his 18 years,” Taylor says.Culberson’s record on Congress.gov includes only one major piece of legislation he sponsored that became law: the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2012. X last_img read more

first_imgBaltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, along with the Baltimore City School Board, introduced new CEO of the Baltimore Public Schools, Dr. Gregory Thornton, during a news conference Feb. 18 at John Eager Howard Elementary School. A life-long educator who once turned down an opportunity to study medicine free of charge because he was committed to becoming a teacher, Thornton comes to Baltimore after spending the last four years serving as superintendent of Milwaukee’s public schools. There, he helped raise graduation rates and improve student achievement scores at a rate higher than the national average, according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress Trial Urban District Assessment for 2013. In her introductory comments, Rawlings-Blake spoke of some of the challenges facing the Baltimore public schools and touted the 21st Century Buildings initiative, an effort to build new schools and renovate existing ones with the aid of $1.1 billion in funds secured by the Baltimore delegation to the Maryland legislature in Annapolis. “Our city school buildings” explained the mayor, “still are the oldest in the state. Many were built in the early part of the 20th century and some unfortunately…are still standing from the 19th century,” she said. “Leaking roofs,…unreliable heating and cooling systems, unusable bathrooms and water fountains had become the norm in too many of our schools and I can’t tell you what it means to me that future generations of Baltimore’s children—current and future—will see new schools, renovated schools, and first-class schools right here in Baltimore.” The sorry state of the school buildings was also attested to by Marcellis McQueen, a fourth grader and reporter for Cool School News, the John Eager Howard Elementary School newspaper. “Our water is always green or brown. Our bathroom, it’s dirty and is always getting flooded and needs improving,” Marcellis said. The young student reporter also noted that he would like to see better gym facilities and a student lounge where kids could receive additional help in subjects such as math. Thornton, whom the Mayor described as “a seasoned administrator” and “an outstanding partner in working to provide [the] world class education that we all want for Baltimore’s children” will take over for interim CEO Tisha Edwards, who oversaw the implementation of Common Core State Standards in the Baltimore public school system in July. In addition to continuing the implementation of Common Core, Thornton will be tasked with overseeing increased access to technology for Baltimore’s public school students, an effort he also helped oversee during his time in Milwaukee. According to Thornton, “On any given day, my kids [in the Milwaukee school system] are out on job sites, not as laborers, they are out basically looking at the role technology plays in every aspect of life.” The necessary tech infrastructure will be installed as part of the 21st Century Buildings initiative, but Thornton said he wants to work to increase access to technology beyond the walls of the schoolhouse for Baltimore’s public school students. “Kids gotta have access at home,” he said. “What I think premiere cities are trying to do is to create a way in which, no matter where you plug in, any time—kid’s laying in bed and can’t sleep, he takes his cell phone and gets caught up. That’s my goal.” In addition to being a life-long educator, Thornton is a grandfather and is accompanied in his move to Baltimore by his wife and fellow educator, Theresa Thornton, whom he has known since they were both 15 years old.last_img read more