first_imgThomson Flights will not be stopping its flights from Robin Hood Airport, airport chiefs have told the Doncaster Free Press.Rumours had been circulating that the airline would pull its services from the Doncaster-Sheffield airport, although they now appear to be unfounded.Speaking to the newspaper, Robin Tudor, spokesman for airport operator Peel Airports, said that Thomson, which is part of the TUI Group, would operate flights from Robin Hood for another decade.”Doncaster Sheffield Airport continues to work closely with TUI and is delighted that the operator will in fact be increasing its capacity through the airport for summer 2009 by utilising larger aircraft on many of their routes,” he said.Thomson has insisted that Robin Hood remains an “important departure airport” and dismissed claims that its flights were being reviewed on a continual basis.The carrier counts Spain, Greece and Turkey as some of its 21 destinations from Robin Hood.Thomson stopped operating flights from Coventry Airport in November but continues to operate from 23 other UK airports. ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Map RelatedIncreased flights to Monastir from Robin Hood AirportIncreased flights to Monastir from Robin Hood AirportRobin Hood Airport services to be stopped by easyJetDemand for flights from Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield remains strong despite one airline’s decision to stop services.Flights to Dublin launched from Doncaster SheffieldFlights to Dublin launched from Doncaster Sheffieldlast_img read more

first_imgSocial video ad spend in the US will grow 44% between 2019 and 2021 to reach US$14.89 billion, accounting for 30.4% of total video ad spend, according to eMarketer.The research firm estimates that Twitter’s US video ad revenues will pass US$1 billion in 2021, while Snapchat’s US video ad business will grow 19.9% year-over-year in 2021, reaching US$727.4 million.“Video has taken centre stage on social platforms that were once text- or photo-centric – including Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, even Pinterest,” said eMarketer principal analyst Paul Verna.“Not only do younger users spend growing amounts of time watching video on these platforms, but they also share clips among their followers, potentially amplifying brand messages.”According to eMarketer research conducted in the fourth quarter of 2018, 60% of respondents said they use Facebook to watch digital video, while 35% used Instagram, 21% Twitter and 18% Snapchat to watch video.While YouTube is not included in eMarketer’s social network video ad spending forecast, 90% of respondents said they used the platform to watch video. The research sampled people aged 15 and over who watched digital video in the previous week.last_img read more

first_img TSX (Toronto Stock Exchange) 15,569.92 15,187.71 12,845.06 Oil 93.29 97.38 108.37 Rock & Stock Stats Last Gold 1,268.80 1,284.60 1,372.60 One Year Ago Dear Reader, We want to know what you think. In his article below, Jeff Clark outlines several reasons to be bullish or bearish on precious metals. You know what we think, but we’re interested in your take—and your intentions. If you’re game, please send an email to subscribers@caseyresearch.com and in 25 words or fewer, tell us your position and reasoning. For example: BOLD: Wall Street is due for a fall, and gold will rise in response. HOLD: Phony government numbers have fooled the public into thinking all is well, so gold may not rise for some time. FOLD: Obama saved us all, and you guys don’t know what you’re talking about. I only subscribe because I think Jeff Clark is cute. We may quote some of the more interesting remarks (light editing for grammar/spelling only), but will include only a first name and last initial to respect your privacy. Note that we recognize various points of view, which is why we have some bets on metals other than gold and silver—our platinum-palladium miner has worked out quite well this year, for instance—and we’ve taken out a new “gold insurance policy” via puts on GLD, in case the market turns against us for a while. The latter is already in the black, as of last week. Remember also that Doug Casey always says that smart speculators don’t put all their eggs in one basket, which is why these dispatches focus on metals and mining on Mondays and other market sectors on other days. Our colleagues in other Casey departments have some great opportunities shaping up. The right tech specs, for example, could hedge your mineral exploration specs. Some of our tech picks have already yielded triple-digit returns this year. As it happens, we’re offering subscribers our best bargain on a subscription package deal, but only for a limited time. When you upgrade your subscription to a Casey OnePass, you get ALL of our monthly newsletters for $1,749 per year. That’s over $2,000 off. Special discounts for Alert subscribers apply. Check it out, diversify, and don’t miss out. Sincerely, Louis James Senior Metals Investment Strategist Casey Research Gold Producers (GDX) 25.07 26.10 27.53center_img Silver 19.20 19.83 23.21 Silver Stocks (SIL) 12.75 13.70 15.09 Copper 3.16 3.20 3.24 Gold Junior Stocks (GDXJ) 39.30 41.33 46.07 One Month Ago TSX Venture 994.89 993.87 947.78last_img read more

first_imgIt was the first — and only — time Dr. Naveed Khan, a 35-year-old radiologist, ever rode in an all-terrain vehicle.Khan took the wheel from his friend and drove circles in the sand, on a trail along the Red River in Texas.”As soon as I turned to the side where my body weight was, this two-seater vehicle … just tilted toward the side and toppled,” Khan recalled. It landed on his left arm.”I had about a 6-inch-wide exposed flesh gap that I could see below, on my forearm,” he said. “And I could see muscle. I could see the fat. I could see the skin. The blood was pooling around it.”Khan, feeling lightheaded, tied his jacket around his arm like a tourniquet. He and his friend managed to right the ATV, drive back toward the street and call 911.When an ambulance delivered him to the emergency room at United Regional Health Care System in Wichita Falls, Khan was surprised to hear a doctor murmur that it was the worst arm injury he’d ever seen.Khan needed immediate helicopter transport to a trauma center for surgery in Fort Worth, if there was any hope of saving the arm.Groggy from painkillers, Khan managed to ask the doctors how much the flight would cost and whether it would be covered by his insurer. “I think they told my friend, ‘He needs to stop asking questions. He needs to get on that helicopter. He doesn’t realize how serious this injury is,’ ” Khan recalled.Flown 108 miles to John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, the closest Level I trauma center, Khan was whisked into surgery to clean out the wound, repair his shattered bones and get blood flowing to the tissue.He had a total of eight operations to try to save his left forearm before he finally gave up. After weeks in the hospital, he asked the doctors to amputate, so he could get on with his life.And then the bill came.Patient: Naveed Khan, 35, a radiologist and married father of three young children in Southlake, Texas.Total bill: $56,603 for an air ambulance flight. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas, Khan’s insurer, paid $11,972, after initially refusing altogether; the medevac company billed Khan for the remaining $44,631.Service provider: Air Evac Lifeteam, an air ambulance company that operates 130 bases in 15 states. It’s owned by Air Medical Group Holdings, a holding company that owns four other air ambulance companies and one ground ambulance company. Air Medical, in turn, is owned by the giant private equity firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts.Medical service: Khan was flown from the United Regional Health Care System in Wichita Falls, Texas, to the John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth.What gives: Khan got his first call from Air Evac Lifeteam just three days after the accident, while he was still lying in the hospital. A company representative told him the helicopter ride would most likely cost more than $50,000 and asked him how he planned to pay.For Khan, rapid transportation to the trauma center was essential since the blood supply to his arm had been cut off, said Dr. Rajesh Gandhi, the medical director for trauma services at JPS Hospital.”If there’s no blood going that means there’s no oxygen,” he said. “It there’s no oxygen, that means those cells are going to die.” Minutes are precious and the helicopter can get from Wichita Falls to Fort Worth in an hour or less, half the time it takes by ground ambulance, he said.But complaints about sky-high bills to patients for air ambulance services are common. Since launching the “Bill of the Month” series in February, NPR and Kaiser Health News have received more than a dozen bills from patients like Khan who were charged tens of thousands of dollars for an air ambulance ride even after insurers’ payments.Air ambulance companies defend their charges.Rick Sherlock, president of the Association of Air Medical Services, a trade group, said air ambulances require a more highly trained crew than a ground ambulance, because only the sickest or most seriously injured patients need air transport.AAMS commissioned a study to determine the actual cost of a medevac ride. The report found it takes about $2.9 million a year to run a single helicopter base. Each base handles about 300 transports a year, and the rides cost about $11,000 each, according to the report.A spokeswoman for Air Evac Lifeteam said the company bills people so much because it is trying to make up for what she said are meager payments from Medicare and Medicaid.”Our real cost per flight is the $10,200 plus the unreimbursed cost on each flight for Medicare, Medicaid and patients without any coverage,” wrote Shelly Schneider, the company spokeswoman.The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services said it pays an average of $4,624 per ride, plus $31.67 a mile, which works out to an average Medicare reimbursement of $6,556 for helicopter ambulance rides for seniors. Medicaid in most states pays less.The industry has been advocating hard to get Medicare to boost its reimbursements, Sherlock said. There are bills pending in both the House and Senate that would do so, but there hasn’t been much movement on them.But others say the industry’s cost estimates are inflated by profit-driven expansion of a lucrative industry. Ground ambulances often carry critically ill patients, too.Too many air ambulances sit idle much of the time, said Dr. Ira Blumen, a professor of emergency medicine at the University of Chicago and medical director of the university’s Aeromedical Network.Blumen said the industry — which is dominated by a few companies owned by private equity firms — expanded dramatically in 2002, the last time Medicare boosted its payments. And now there are too many helicopters — 908 as of last year — fighting for patients and profits at the same time.”The number of helicopters is outrageous for the continental United States,” he said. In the 1990s, most helicopters ran more than 500 flights per year on average. At that rate, the cost per flight today would be less than $6,000.A BCBS of Texas spokesman said the insurer does have a contracted rate with an in-network air ambulance company, but it is not Air Evac Lifeteam. After initially refusing to pay anything for an out-of-network claim, it agreed to the $11,972 payment.But in some sense, the reason ambulance companies charge so much is simply that they can: Air ambulances are largely regulated not as health care but as part of the aviation industry. Federal laws prevent states from limiting aviation rates, routes and services.So many people have been hit with shockingly high air ambulance bills that members of Congress on both sides of the aisle are trying to do something about it. Legislation to reauthorize funding for the Federal Aviation Administration that is moving through Congress now would create a council of industry experts to address balance billing and other issues and set up a complaint line for consumers.Resolution: Khan has allowed Air Evac Lifeteam to negotiate with BCBS of Texas over the remaining $44,000 air ambulance bill. The company has asked him to appeal to the state’s Department of Insurance, and though he first balked at the suggestion, he is now considering doing so. Khan says he doesn’t understand why the helicopter flight, which was an integral part of the emergency medical care he received, is treated differently from his surgeries, nursing care and physical therapy.”I thought that this was another piece of that puzzle,” he said. “It turns out that this was glaringly different.”He is waiting for resolution as he gets accustomed to life with his disability. Holding his baby son, he asked in frustration: “How do I hold him while he’s crying and at the same time heat up his bottle?”Khan, who has had to fight with his insurance company to get coverage for a prosthetic arm, is frustrated when he learns that the air ambulance company expects him to pay far more than the actual cost of his flight.”It’s unfair,” he says. “It’s random; it’s arbitrary. It’s whatever price they want to set. And to put that onto a person who’s already been through what I’ve been through, I hate to say it, but it’s cruel.”The takeaway: Most people with health problems serious enough to require a helicopter flight are in no position to ask whether the medevac company is in-network or there’s a choice. But if you or a family member has time to ask, it could pay off.If you’re faced with a huge bill for a medevac ride, there are a few steps you should take.First, let your insurer’s process play out. BCBS of Texas first denied Khan’s claim altogether. But he looked closely at his policy and saw that the threat of loss of limb was explicitly covered. He appealed, and that’s when the insurer paid $11,972.Second, negotiate! The air ambulance company might be willing to negotiate a settlement for a fraction of the bill to avoid turning to debt collectors, who would pay them pennies on the dollar.Both Sherlock of the Association of Air Medical Services and Schneider of Air Evac Lifeteam said companies will try to determine what a patient can afford. So people with high incomes may find it hard to obtain a substantial reduction for their bill. Still, if patients know the true cost of the service they received, they may be better equipped to negotiate a discount.Many air ambulance companies offer membership plans that can cost less than $100 a year and guarantee that the company will accept whatever payment an insurance company makes without billing the patient for the rest. But buyer, beware: When people need an air ambulance, they are often not in a position to choose which company will respond to the call.Bill of the Month is a crowdsourced investigation by Kaiser Health News and NPR that dissects and explains medical bills. Do you have an interesting medical bill you want to share with us? Tell us about it! Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

first_imgShereese Hickson’s multiple sclerosis was flaring again. Spasms in her legs and other symptoms were getting worse. She could still walk and take care of her son six years after doctors diagnosed the disease, which attacks the central nervous system. Earlier symptoms such as slurred speech and vision problems had resolved with treatment, but others lingered: She was tired and sometimes fell. This summer, a doctor switched her to Ocrevus, a drug approved in 2017 that delayed progression of the disease in clinical trials better than an older medicine did. Genentech, a South San Francisco, Calif.-based subsidiary of Swiss pharmaceutical giant Roche, makes Ocrevus. The drug is one of several for multiple sclerosis that are delivered intravenously in a hospital or clinic. Such medicines have become increasingly expensive, priced in many cases at well over $80,000 a year. Hospitals delivering the drugs often make money by charging a premium on top of their cost or adding hefty fees for the infusion clinic. Hickson received her first two Ocrevus infusions as an outpatient two weeks apart in July and August. And then the bill came. Patient: Shereese Hickson, 39, single mother who worked as a health aide and trained as a medical coder, living in Girard, Ohio. Because her MS has left her too disabled to work, she is now on Medicare; she also has Medicaid for backup.Total bill: $123,019 for two Ocrevus infusions taken as an outpatient. CareSource, Hickson’s Medicare managed care plan, paid a discounted $28,960. Hickson got a bill for about $3,620, the balance calculated as her share by the hospital after the insurance reimbursement.Medical service: Two Ocrevus infusions, each requiring several hours at the hospital.Service provider: Cleveland Clinic, a nonprofit, academic medical center based in Ohio. (Cleveland Clinic has provided financial support for NPR.)What gives: Hickson researched Ocrevus online after her doctor prescribed the new medicine. “I’ve seen people’s testimonies about how great it is” on YouTube, she said. “But I don’t think they really go into what it’s like receiving the bill.” That was particularly shocking because, covered by government insurance for her disability, she had never received a bill for MS medicine before.”I have a 9-year-old son and my income is $770 a month,” said Hickson. “How am I supposed to support him and then you guys are asking me for $3,000?”Even in a world of soaring drug prices, multiple sclerosis medicines stand out. Over two decades ending in 2013, costs for MS medicines rose at annual rates five to seven times higher than those for prescription drugs generally, found a study by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University.”There was no competition on price that was occurring,” said Daniel Hartung, the OHSU and Oregon State University professor who led the study. “It appeared to be the opposite. As newer drugs were brought to market, it promoted increased escalation in drug prices.”With Ocrevus, Genentech did come up with a price that was slightly less than for rival drugs, but only after MS medicines were already extremely expensive. The drug launched last year at an annual list price of $65,000, about 25 percent lower than that of other MS drugs, Hartung said. MS drugs cost about $10,000 per year in the 1990s and about $30,000 a decade ago. “We set the price of Ocrevus to reduce price as a barrier to treatment,” said Genentech spokeswoman Amanda Fallon. It was also probably a response to bad publicity about expensive MS drugs, Hartung said. “Now companies are very aware at least of the optics of releasing drugs at higher and higher prices,” he said. Patients starting Ocrevus get two initial infusions of 300 milligrams each and then 600 milligrams twice a year. Cleveland Clinic charged $117,089 for Hickson’s first two doses of Ocrevus — more than three times what hospitals typically pay for the drug, said John Hennessy, chief business development officer at WellRithms, a firm that analyzes medical bills for self-insured employers. As is typical of government programs such as Medicare, the $28,960 reimbursement ultimately collected by the Cleveland Clinic was far less — but still substantial. “We kind of got ourselves in a pickle here,” he said. “We’re more excited about the discount than we are about the actual price.”Hickson’s nearly $3,620 bill represented the portion that Medicare patients often are expected to pay themselves.Last year, the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, an independent nonprofit that evaluates medical treatments, completed a detailed study on MS medicines. It found that Ocrevus was one of three or four medicines that were most effective in reducing MS relapses and preventing MS from getting worse. But it also found that patient benefits from MS drugs “come at a high relative cost” to society. At the same time, deciding which MS drug — there are about a dozen — would best suit patients is something of a shot in the dark: The science showing the comparative effectiveness of MS drugs is not as strong as it could be, researchers say.”In general, there’s a real lack of head-to-head studies for many of these drugs,” said Hartung. The [Food and Drug Administration] has no required comparison standard for MS drugs, an agency spokeswoman said. Sometimes they’re rated against placebos. With everyone able to charge a high price, the companies have little incentive to see which works better and which worse.Resolution: After Hickson questioned the charges over the phone, the billing office told her to apply to the hospital for financial assistance. Hickson had to print a form, provide proof of her disabled status, mail it and wait.Hospital officials told her in October she qualified for assistance based on her income through a state program funded by hospital contributions and federal money. Cleveland Clinic wiped out the $3,620 balance.”I’m grateful that they approved me for that, but not everybody’s situation is like that,” she said. She was worried enough about being billed again for her next Ocrevus infusion that she considered switching back to her old medicine. But her doctor wants her to give it more time to gauge its effects.The takeaway: Always ask about charity care or financial assistance programs. Hospitals have different policies and wide discretion about how to apply them, but they often do not even tell patients such programs exist. Because health care costs can be so high, you may be eligible even if you have a decent salary. Cleveland Clinic gives free care to everybody below a certain income, said spokeswoman Heather Phillips. But it wasn’t until Hickson called that the hospital agreed to erase the charge. While there are multiple new drugs to treat serious chronic conditions, they have often not been tested against one another. Moreover, your doctor may have no idea about their prices. But he or she should. For newer drugs, all options may well be very expensive. Keep in mind that drugs that must be infused often come with facility fees and infusion charges, which can leave patients with hefty copayments for outpatient treatment. Ask about oral medicines or those you can self-inject at home. NPR produced and edited the interview with Kaiser Health News’ Elisabeth Rosenthal for broadcast. Marlene Harris-Taylor, from member station Ideastream in Cleveland, provided audio reporting.Do you have an exorbitant or baffling medical bill that you’d like KHN and NPR to look into? You can tell us about it and submit a copy of the bill here. KHN is a nonprofit news service covering health issues. It is an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation that isn’t affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Copyright 2018 Kaiser Health News. To see more, visit Kaiser Health News.last_img read more

first_imgA disabled lawyer could seek a judicial review of the Scottish government’s draft budget, which he claims discriminates against disabled people by cutting hundreds of millions of pounds from local authority funding.Daniel Donaldson (pictured), director of Legal Spark Law Centre in Glasgow, is discussing a possible legal action with disabled people and their organisations concerned about the implications of this month’s budget.He said Legal Spark was being contacted by increasing numbers of disabled people who have faced “unfair reassessments” of their support packages by cost-cutting councils, even before the SNP budget saw proposed cuts of £350 million to council funding, a reduction of 3.5 per cent.Donaldson said: “We cannot see how the Scottish government’s current budget complies with their legal obligations under the Equality Act 2010 and the Human Rights Act 1998.“It is reasonably foreseeable that if you cut services within the public sector, that the people who rely the most on those services will be adversely affected.“Disabled people and the carers of disabled people rely on the support they receive from the public sector.“It is therefore arguable that the budget proposed by the finance secretary discriminates against both disabled people and their carers.“No-one should have to face discrimination, or have their dignity violated as a result of cuts in the public sector.”Donaldson pointed to last week’s statement by the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA), which described the budget cuts as “totally unacceptable” and “catastrophic for jobs and services within Scottish local government”, including those for older and disabled people.He is hoping to avoid a judicial review by obtaining a written pledge from finance secretary John Swinney that support for disabled people and carers will not be cut as a result of the budget.A Scottish government spokeswoman said its budget “does not discriminate” and that its budget equality statement had been an “integral part” of the budget process.She said: “Despite ongoing cuts to our budget as a result of the UK government’s continuing austerity programme, the Scottish government is continuing to protect people and treat local government very fairly with settlements maintained on a like-for-like basis over 2012-16.“This is part of an overall budget which has protected the third sector and equality budgets, maintained welfare mitigation funding, invested in energy efficiency and fuel poverty measures, and will see us boost the supply of affordable homes and homes for social rent.“Local government in Scotland starts from a healthy base, especially compared to the position in England where councils faced a significant real terms cut in funding.“This funding proposal delivers a strong but challenging financial settlement for local government which will be strengthened by our joint working to improve outcomes for local people through health and social care integration.”But Donaldson said that the Scottish government’s Fly the Flag for Human Rights campaign and its consultation on implementing the UN disability convention were meaningless unless it took positive action to give “tangible meaning” to words such as “equality, human rights, dignity and respect”.He is now hoping to hear from more disabled people interested in taking legal action against the Scottish government*.*Daniel Donaldson can be contacted via email at contact@legalspark.co.uklast_img read more

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 23 2019Middle-aged women with a history of preeclampsia have a greater risk of stroke, and aspirin may be able to reduce the risk, according to a new study led by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons. The study was published today in the journal Neurology, along with an accompanying editorial and podcast.Why it mattersThough preeclampsia rates are declining or stable in other developed nations, they are rapidly rising in the United States, where about one in 20 pregnancies is complicated by preeclampsia and other pregnancy-related hypertensive disorders.Preeclampsia increases the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease, including stroke, a leading cause of disability and death in women. Although younger stroke patients are usually less impaired by stroke in the short term than older patients, years of disability and loss of income can have severe long-term consequences.BackgroundLow-dose aspirin treatment during pregnancy decreases the incidence of preeclampsia among high-risk women, but most women stop taking aspirin after delivery. It is unknown whether aspirin use after delivery offers long-term benefits.What the study foundThe researchers used data from 84,000 women enrolled in the California Teachers Study; of these, roughly 4,000 had a history of preeclampsia. Women were considered regular aspirin users if they reported taking aspirin three or more times a week after delivery for at least one year.The researchers found that the overall stroke risk was 30 percent higher in women with a history of preeclampsia, compared to those with no history.Regular aspirin use seemed to erase the increased risk of stroke associated with preeclampsia, but only in women under 60. Aspirin users in this age group with a history of preeclampsia had the same stroke risk as women with no history of the condition. In comparison, formerly preeclamptic women in this age group who did not take aspirin had a 50 percent greater risk of stroke.Related StoriesInvestment in stroke prevention interventions is good for the futureNew discovery may explain some forms of strokeStudy explores role of iron in over 900 diseasesAspirin use had no significant effect on reducing excess stroke risk in women over 60 with a history of preeclampsia.What it meansThe study is a first step in exploring the idea that aspirin may prevent strokes in women with a history of preeclampsia.”It would be premature, at this point, to recommend aspirin for all women with a history of preeclampsia, since aspirin can have serious side effects, such as bleeding that leads to hospitalization,” says lead author Eliza C. Miller, MD, a neurologist at Columbia University Irving Medical Center.But Miller says that aspirin may be warranted for some of these women. Many organizations currently recommend low-dose aspirin to prevent heart attack and stroke for some people at high risk of cardiovascular disease.”A history of preeclampsia is currently not considered when calculating 10-year cardiovascular risk, but it probably needs to be incorporated into risk-estimation guidelines,” Miller says. “Some women with this history may need primary preventive treatment with aspirin, even in the absence of additional vascular risk factors.”Next stepsThe current study was observational and shows only that aspirin is associated with reduced stroke risk in women with a history of preeclampsia.Randomized controlled trials are needed to establish the efficacy of aspirin for the primary prevention of stroke in selected women with a history of preeclampsia.Study limitationsThe study group was largely white and may not be representative of all women with the condition. “Some groups of women, especially African Americans, are at higher risk for both preeclampsia and stroke, and it’s possible we would see an even stronger effect of aspirin in such groups,” says Miller.Source: https://www.cuimc.columbia.edu/last_img read more

first_img Explore further His firm behind the project—”The Boring Company”—wants to create tunnels that link up with existing subway lines to “complement the system”.During the presentation in Los Angeles Thursday, Musk showed a video explaining the tunnels. Passengers would embark at ground-level into an 16-person shuttle—an elevator of sorts, which then joins a high-speed, electricity-powered network that travels at up to 125 miles per hour (200 kilometers per hour.)The idea is for the vehicles to offer a service somewhere between riding a subway and traveling in a private car—and for just $1, passengers could reach downtown LA from its international airport in under 10 minutes.The Tesla and SpaceX CEO’s long term vision is for the tunnels to also serve his Hyperloop ultra high-speed pod project—which he says would cut the six hour drive from San Francisco to Los Angeles to just 30 minutes.”We’re aiming to go over 300 miles an hour in a vacuum tunnel,” Musk said. Citation: Elon Musk presents underground LA tunnel project (2018, May 18) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-elon-musk-underground-la-tunnel.html Entrepreneur Elon Musk has given updated details of a project to build high-speed transport tunnels underneath Los Angeles in a bid to combat traffic and said he wanted to work with the city’s subway operator. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Elon Musk says LA-area test tunnel almost complete (Update) © 2018 AFPlast_img read more

first_img Journal information: Science of the Total Environment EPFL researchers have developed a simulator that can calculate the performance of wind farms over 30 years while also factoring in the need to preserve local biodiversity. Tested at a site in the Carpathian Mountains in Romania, the simulator could be applied to the Swiss Jura region, which has a similar landscape. A wind turbine in the Romanian Carpathians. Credit: © 2018 University of Bucharest More information: Jiannong Fang et al. Shifts in wind energy potential following land-use driven vegetation dynamics in complex terrain, Science of The Total Environment (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.05.083 Three EPFL labs were involved in developing the model in partnership with the University of Bucharest in Romania. Researchers from the Wind Engineering and Renewable Energy Laboratory (WIRE), the Ecological Systems Laboratory (ECOS) and the Laboratory of Geographic Information Systems (LASIG) pooled their data and models with those of experts from the University of Bucharest’s Centre of Landscape–Territory–Information Systems (CeLTIS) as part of a ground-breaking initiative in wind energy. Their aim is to provide the local authorities with a model they can use to simulate in a given landscape the wind energy potential in the long term, taking into account the evolution of the landscape and its biodiversity: the model allows to integrate for instance the role of agricultural land use. This is important for striking the right balance between arable land and pastureland, which can help to generate strong winds, and natural woodland, where the trees tend to reduce the performance of wind farms.This study was part of the WindLand project funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation, through a scientific partnership involving SCCER-FURIES, InnoSuisse and Romania. The case study simulated the impact of land use policy on wind energy potential and biodiversity in the Southern Carpathians, even though no such project is in the pipeline for the moment.Don’t shoot for maximum productionFor authorities interested in building a wind farm, the model provides data on how much wind energy can be produced and how heterogeneous the landscape has to be in order to preserve local biodiversity. According to the study, if the surrounding area is predominantly woodland, the wind farm will produce only 60% of its maximum capacity and biodiversity will be moderate. On the other hand, if the area is totally cleared for pasture and intensive farming, the wind farm will be at full production but biodiversity will be considerably reduced owing to the mundane landscape.When the right balance is struck between agricultural land and forest, the wind farm can maintain 70–80% of its production capacity, and biodiversity remains high because of the heterogeneous landscape and diverse habitats. Another advantage of this multidisciplinary coupled model is that it quantifies the wind farm’s energy production throughout its useful life. Citation: Striking the right balance between wind energy and biodiversity (2018, June 25) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-energy-biodiversity.html Explore further Impacts of windfarm construction on harbor porpoises Provided by Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne The topography and landscape of the Carpathian Mountains are similar to those of Switzerland’s Jura region, with mountains – ranging from 930 to 1,400 meters – dotted with forests, fields and pastures, as well as isolated tress. The model could therefore be applied in Switzerland as well.Finding a compromise”Our findings show that it’s possible to reach a compromise between biodiversity and wind-energy production and that trying to achieve maximum energy output straightaway is an error,” explains Jiannong Fang, a researcher at the WIRE Lab and lead author of the study, which was published in the June issue of Science of the Total Environment, in partnership with Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL).A physicist by training, Fang learned to speak the language of his ecology and geography colleagues in the ECOS and LASIG labs in order to integrate economic, agronomic, social, environmental and topographic data into his model. “Thanks to the models from those labs, I was able to improve my wind energy predictions and extend them over the long term,” says Fang. “I was also able to look at how the landscape and surrounding forest could be developed and how this would impact wind energy potential.”Since the fall of communism, large patches of wooded pastureland, which covered half of the Carpathian region, have been left abandoned. These areas used to be very biodiverse, and the strong winds would have made them an ideal spot for a wind farm. But today the forest is claiming back its territory. The simulator developed by EPFL aims to determine how the landscape can be used effectively for wind production while also preserving the region’s current biodiversity.Jiannong Fang is looking to further hone his model: “Climate change may have a slight impact on our findings. Adding various climate scenarios relating, for instance, to changes in humidity and vegetation would make our model’s predictions even more reliable and could be the topic of a future work.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

first_imgMusk initially rejected the SEC’s allegations on Thursday, calling the charges baseless and vowing to defend himself. But investor pressure amid the tanking share prices may have given him second thoughts.Tesla has continued to express support for Musk, saying the company and its directors “are fully confident in Elon, his integrity, and his leadership.”The SEC settlement may not end Musk’s regulatory troubles, however, since there are reports of a pending criminal investigation as well.Keri Axel, a former federal prosecutor and SEC enforcement lawyer who now is in private practice, said the swift filing of charges—so soon after Musk’s August comments—raised eyebrows in the legal community.”The timing of this is so fast, that seems very aggressive,” Axel told AFP.”One possibility is that the SEC is cooperating with criminal authorities” preparing to file additional charges.But a criminal case would be much harder to prove since prosecutors would need to show “an intent to deceive investors,” according to Axel. ‘Everyone was wrong’Gene Munster and Doug Clinton of Loup Ventures said in a research note that they believe Tesla will survive.The sharp decline in Tesla shares is “an overreaction,” the analysts wrote. They had predicted, before the settlement was announced, that Musk could remain CEO and “find a way to continue to be involved with the company in some sort of product/visionary capacity.”They added that Tesla appears to have built up a sustainable production pace and that “the trajectory of the business is improving at a level that can support servicing its upcoming debt obligations and eventually generate cash.”Trip Chowdhry of Global Equities Research, a longtime Tesla bull, said his view on the company is unchanged by the SEC action.Chowdhry said Tesla is “hyper-innovative” and that the company is essentially “in autonomous mode” in its production scheme, far ahead of rivals in battery technology.”They are creating a brand new industry which never existed before,” the analyst said. “It’s software-driven transportation.”Chowdhry said that Tesla—with or without Musk—has a bright future because of its pace of innovation, and he compared Musk to the late Steve Jobs.”So many people thought that with the death of Steve Jobs, Apple was dead,” he said. “Everyone was wrong, including me.” Under a settlement of federal fraud charges, Elon Musk will remain as chief executive of electric automaker Tesla while stepping down as chairman and paying a fine Tesla, which has seen strong demand for its electric cars, is ramping up efforts to become a mainstream producer US regulators charge Tesla CEO Elon Musk with fraud Analysts are divided on how vital the visionary Musk is to Tesla’s continued development Citation: Musk escapes the worst, but Tesla still faces a bumpy road (2018, September 30) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-musk-worst-tesla-bumpy-road.html Criminal case coming?Tesla’s brash leader has faced increased scrutiny over his volatile behavior, including smoking marijuana during a podcast interview and assailing a man involved in the Thailand cave rescue as a “pedo guy.” Explore further Tesla has promised to revolutionize the automobile, but the high-end electric car maker keeps hitting road blocks created by its founder Elon Musk’s erratic behavior and considerable ego. © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Those traits contributed to fraud charges brought against Musk on Thursday by federal regulators, a potentially serious blow coming just as Tesla is ramping up efforts to become a mainstream manufacturer. But on Saturday, the brilliant billionaire escaped the worst after reaching a settlement with the US Securities and Exchange Commission that leaves him as chief executive while forcing him to step down as chairman and pay a $20 million fine.The settlement, which will leave the 47-year-old overseeing Tesla’s daily operations, provides at least a momentary reprieve from the company’s many challenges—including Musk’s own sometimes counterproductive instincts.Tesla is at something of a turning point. It has been accelerating production of its Model 3, the mass-market vehicle with a potential to disrupt the entire automotive sector—yet the company remains burdened by billions in debt and has yet to show a profit.The SEC filing on Thursday alleged that Musk committed securities fraud by misleading investors when he tweeted on August 7 that he had “funding secured” to privatize the electric automaker at $420 a share, a comment that caused Tesla’s share price to briefly spike. The case underscored doubts about the mercurial entrepreneur’s ability to lead Tesla, while at the same time highlighting the confidence some retain in him as a necessary visionary force behind the company.”Despite Musk’s recent erratic behavior, we think most investors want him to remain with the company and they value shares at what we view as extremely lofty multiples given the potential for Musk’s vision to drive future growth,” Garrett Nelson of the research firm CFRA said in a note to clients.Analyst David Whiston at Morningstar reiterated his comments from a month earlier that “Musk is effectively Tesla, and without him Tesla is just a capital-intensive automaker burning cash with too much debt due soon.”Tesla shares have skidded nearly 30 percent from their peak in early August, amid growing concerns on the company’s ability to expand without its founder.last_img read more

first_img PETALING JAYA: Limkokwing University of Creative Technology was informed of the death of its student Thomas Orhions Ewansiha on Thursday (July 11) while in custody over his visa status.UPDATE: Nigerian tried to flee during raid, says ImmigrationThe university said a request was made by a member of the Nigerian Embassy at 11.33am on Thursday (July 11) to share the student’s records.This was to confirm that he was indeed the person who died while being detained to verify his visa status. Related News “We immediately responded by making all files available to the embassy.“To our knowledge, Mr Thomas (Ewansiha ) was detained on July 5 at a public place in Kuala Lumpur during a raid,” the university said in a statement on Friday (July 12).Ewansiha, who was pursuing his PhD in management, was married with two young children.The university said Ewansiha was a member of its postgraduate centre.“He was an inspired young man. We offer our condolences to his family and many close friends.“We have no further information at this time. We are grateful for calm and understanding during this difficult time,” it said.On Thursday, a group of Nigerians reportedly held a protest outside the Nigerian high commission in Kuala Lumpur.The Star has reached out to the police for more information. {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Culture 07 Jul 2019 The ‘Mona Lisa’ Is Coming To Kuala Lumpur Related News Limkokwing , Student , Death Tags / Keywords: Volume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2019/07/12/limkokwing-confirms-phd-student-died-in-custody/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0001:2401:24 last_img read more

first_img Nation 09 Jul 2019 Fu: Investment opportunities aplenty along BRI routes Corporate News 10 Jul 2019 Maybank IB adjudged AsiaPac’s best Islamic investment bank, Sukuk adviser Fad’l: It is not a zero-sum game – indeed, sustainable investing has and continues to prove its significance to business decision makers and shareholders alike. Tags / Keywords: Investment , ESG {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Related News In Malaysia, the ESG trend has started to take place with the country’s large asset owners, namely the Employees Provident Fund (EPF), the Retirement Fund Incorporated (KWAP), Khazanah Nasional Bhd and Corston-Smith Asset Management Sdn Bhd.These companies are the signatories to the UN Principles for Responsible Investment (UNPRI), which demonstrated their commitment to responsible investments to advocate a more sustainable financial system.Bursa Malaysia CEO Datuk Muhamad Umar Swift said more public-listed companies and agencies in the country were taking strong interests in ESG investing and reporting, adding that “they are making voluntary announcements and disclosure of information beyond what is mandated under the rules.”He pointed out that “we reviewed the first batch of sustainability disclosures issued by public-listed companies with market cap of RM2bil and above and we saw an overall average compliance level of 91% among the same companies.” Meanwhile, Energy, Science, Technology, Environment and Climate Change Minister Yeo Bee Yin, who officiated the conference, said the government would be announcing more bids for large-scale solar (LSS) power projects worth RM2bil by the end of 2020. “There will be some changes on how we will tender the LSS project. “It all be more innovative and hopefully it would be able to drive the cost even lower compared to what we are seeing now,” added Yeo.However, she did not reveal the specific details on the tenders. Earlier this year, the Pakatan Harapan government had called for bids for projects worth RM2bil under the under the third round of the large-scale solar (LSS3) scheme to increase electricity generation from renewable energy.Yeo noted that LSS3 would be commercialised in the next two to three years. “Next year, we are also opening for more LSS,” she said. Given that 719 companies have participated in the tender, she said it would be “a very fierce competition” among players. The submission for proposals will be closed mid-August this year. Besides that, Yeo reiterated that the government would be replacing the Environmental Quality Act 1974 with a new Act, which would be known as Pollution Control Act, pushing for stiffer punishments for those who pollute the environment.On whether the new Act may add costs to businesses, she noted that it would not have a big impact for businesses, saying that the government would present the cost figures during a town hall meeting for the new Act next month. In early March this year, around 6,000 Pasir Gudang residents were affected when the illegal dumping of chemical substances into Sungai Kim Kim released toxic fumes in the area. KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia should create more environmental, social and governance (ESG) investment opportunities, similar to those which have been done successfully in line with the growth of the Islamic finance market, says Maybank Investment Bank Bhd chief executive officer Fad’l Mohamed.“We have already embarked on the ship sailing towards a more sustainable future. “It is not a zero-sum game – indeed, sustainable investing has and continues to prove its significance to business decision makers and shareholders alike,” Fad’l said at the The Evolution of ESG Investing Conference hosted by Maybank and Bursa Malaysia Bhd here yesterday.To date, about US$31 trillion of assets under management are invested using sustainable strategies – an increase of 35% in just two years. Related News Corporate News 11 Jul 2019 Govt to call for more large-scale solar power tenderslast_img read more