first_imgSamsung Galaxy Home Juan Garzon/CNET When Samsung first started talking about making a Bixby-powered smart speaker last year, it said it would arrive in the second half of 2018. Samsung officially announced the Galaxy Home at its Galaxy Note 9 event in August 2018 and promised to share more details at the company’s developer conference in November. It showed off the speaker again then, but didn’t give specifics on its launch date.Then at the Galaxy S10 Unpacked event in February 2019, Samsung co-CEO DJ Koh told CNET that it would launch the speaker by April. (Samsung’s US PR department, though, would only say it would launch in the first half of 2019.)Now it’s mid-May and, and the world remains without a Bixby-powered cauldron. What gives? Share your voice Amazon Google Samsung Samsung’s first Bixby speaker, the Galaxy Home, revealed 0 2:23 Galaxy Home: Samsung’s answer to the HomePod News • Samsung Galaxy Home reportedly delayed to later this year Now playing: Watch this:center_img Samsung Galaxy Home In a statement provided to CNET on Friday, a Samsung spokesperson said it’s “planning to launch Galaxy Home in the first half of 2019,” making it clear that Samsung still intends to release the device. But the company didn’t share any specifics, and it hasn’t yet detailed the Galaxy Home’s pricing.  Bixby is Samsung’s homegrown digital voice assistant that launched with the Galaxy S8 about three years ago. It initially was geared as an interface to control the phone, but Samsung since then expanded the technology into its various appliances and televisions. A smart speaker is aimed to be the latest home for Bixby, taking advantage of the expertise of Samsung’s Harman audio expertise. For Samsung and numerous others, artificial intelligence is the next big wave of computing. Every tech heavyweight is investing in these assistants because they’re heralded as the future of how we’ll interact with our gadgets. But it’s already a crowded arena, with Google and Amazon largely dominating the smart speaker market. The Galaxy Home’s lateness could make it even tougher to compete. The delay of the Home comes as Samsung struggles to get its flashy Galaxy Fold out the door. A number of devices tested by journalists ahead of the $1,980 foldable phone’s release suffered from broken or damaged tablet displays, leading Samsung to postpone its planned April 26 launch. More smart speakers: Sonos readying Google Assistant update for next weekThis week the company emailed those who preordered the device saying that it would cancel their orders if the phone doesn’t ship by May 31 unless customers tell the company that they want to keep them. With a little over a month to go until the first half of the year ends, time is certainly ticking to see if Samsung hits this latest target. CNET’s Shara Tibken contributed to this report. Preview • A Galaxy far, far away? Samsung’s Bixby speaker is still a no-show Smart Speakers & Displays Tags 12 Photos Post a commentlast_img read more

first_imgBy George Kevin Jordan, Special to the AFROCongresswoman Frederica S. Wilson (D-FL 24th District) has a mission – pull young Black boys out of the school-to-prison pipeline. She hopes her 5,000 Role Models of Excellence Project is the ticket to providing diplomas and degrees instead of prison sentences.Wilson had big help pushing her project during the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s Annual Legislative Conference held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Northwest, D.C.The Rev. Al Sharpton, actress and activist Erika Alexander and Dr. Cedric Alexander, national president of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives. (Photo by George Kevin Jordan)The Rev. Al Sharpton was on the panel, as well as actor and activist Erika Alexander, “America To Me” director Steve James, Dr. Cedric Alexander, national president of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives and George Ray III, current contestant on the “Grand Hustle” series on BET Networks.The Excellence project started in Miami-Dade County when Wilson saw the young men her community rushed into the prison system, working in the drug trade or dropping out of school.On a national level there were 1,506,800 people in prison at the end of 2016, according to the Department of Justice. There were 487,300 Black prisoners, or 41.3 percent. This is in comparison to 39 percent White prisoners.When it comes to school drop outs, the number of Black boys who drop out between the ages of 16-24 has dropped nationally to 6.2 percent. But that number is still higher that the national average and White students’ 6.1 percent and 5.2 percent respectively, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.In 1993, when Wilson started her program, it almost immediately caught national attention. Several sitting presidents and vice-presidents, including Barack Obama have supported the project. The initiative provides leadership and mentoring to young Black boys during a critical time in their lives.The panel dissected many of the issues that impact a child’s trajectory to the school to prison system.  Dr. Alexander spoke about police officers using more discretion and thinking of the larger community when arresting people.“The law is what the law is,” Dr. Alexander said, who heads up the National Organization of Black law Enforcement Executives. “But what we can ask them  [police officers] to do is use some judgement. Do you really want to hurt someone over an infraction? We as police officers have to have discretion.”“I think what we are beginning to see as we’re training officers to have better relationships, we find some, not all, but some are mindful of the fact that there is a larger community watching you.”Mayor Oliver G. Gilbert III, who is mayor of Miami Gardens, Florida, said citizens need to be mindful of how much they want police involved with their students at schools.“We can’t over police our schools,” Gilbert said. “We can’t use police at schools as conduct supervisors. Understand if you ask a police officer to come to our schools and they witness a crime that kid is going to jail.”Gilbert further cautioned, “We have to be careful of the part we are playing in this narrative.”For George Ray, III who currently stars on “The Grand Hustle” series, Congresswoman Wilson intervened at the right time in his life. “She’s my fairy godmother,” Ray said to the packed crowd. The business professor spoke of facing 15 years in prison at 15 years old. The congresswoman happened upon his life and “instead of peddling drugs I had someone peddling hope.”“She took me everywhere with her, she kept me so busy I couldn’t get in trouble if I tried,” Ray said of his relationship with Wilson.Currently, the 5000 Role Models of Excellence Project services 105 schools within Miami-Dade County Public Schools (37 Elementary, 35 Middle/K-8, and 33 Senior High), according to the organization.last_img read more