first_img Related Items:escape artist, Genmessome Presandieu, police, resisting arrest, Rolyn Cassema, two counts of assaulting a police officer, unlawful entry Update: Women robbed while exercising (21 year old Arrested) Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Police get wanted man; Magistrate Court back open Royal Turks and Caicos Islands Police Force’s mission to combat abusive images of children online Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 08 Jul 2015 – Serious charges for a 20 year old resident, originally from Haiti who appears to be some sort of an escape artist. Police report that Genmessome Presandieu also known as Rolyn Cassema was charged for a battery of concerning offenses including: unlawful entry, two counts of assaulting a police officer, resisting arrest and more vexing having a gun while allegedly resisting arrest and having ammunition for that gun, the charge added is also endangering lives.No bail was granted for the ‘Houdini’ who appeared in court yesterday. There were some smaller arrests including a 57 year old, Five Cays man, who has to answer charges for allegedly stealing three bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky from IGA; a 29 year old Venetian Road resident who was charged for damage to property and using a weapon to cause fear and a 28 year old of Five Cays man, for fighting. Recommended for youlast_img read more

first_imgArsenal’s head of recruitment Sven Mislintat holds Ousmane Dembele in a high regard, amid the uncertainty surrounding his Barcelona futureThe 21-year-old forward has struggled to make an impact at Camp Nou following his €105m transfer from Borussia Dortmund in 2017.And now Dembele’s troubles at Barcelona have been brought into the spotlight amid reports of an uneasy relationship with manager Ernesto Valverde.Due to this, Dembele has been linked with a January move to Arsenal with Barcelona legend Rivaldo suggesting that the Frenchman is trying to force an exit.Now Mislintat, who helped recruit Dembele to Dortmund while he worked at the German club, has done little to deny these reports.“I saw him, he had not even played for Stade Rennes in the first team,” Mislintat told Zeit.“I bet he did not know which foot he used in certain situations because he just did not think about it.David Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.“I felt this is a really special player.”Mislintat, who joined Arsenal last year and helped wager a move for Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang in January, holds no hard feelings towards Dembele for his behaviour in the summer of 2017.Upon learning of Barcelona’s interest in him, Dembele refused to attend training sessions at Dortmund in an attempt to force a move to Catalonia.“Ousmane did not come to training – right,” added Mislintat.“But this ability to develop strategies to exploit every gap was worth gold on the field.“Ousmane decided to play games for us and was significantly responsible for the 2017 cup victory.“Many of these top players who make the difference come from different environments, where they became hungry for promotion and success. They have a special intrinsic motivation.”last_img read more

first_img 12 smart doorbells to watch over your front stoop 13 Photos Smart Home Gadgets Video Cameras Security Tags These devices sound like they’d come in handy and would do a good job at deterring theft. What are some other reasons you’d use them? Maybe you don’t want to walk all the way to the front door just to find out your visitor was a solicitor. Maybe you have mobility issues. Or maybe you want to catch creeps like this guy. There’s a wide array of reasons and a wide array of smart doorbells to choose from.So we want to know: Do you own a smart doorbell already? Has it paid off? Have you caught a thief in the act? If so, please share! If not, do you find yourself wanting one? What features are you looking for? If you don’t want one, how come? Check out the poll below and cast your vote to answer these questions and more. If you’d like to explain your vote further, please join us in the comments.Check out previous installments of CNET Asks here, and cast your votes on a wide range of topics. If there is a particular question you’d like to see asked, or if you’d like a shot at being featured in a future edition, join us at CNET Member Asks and submit your topic idea.  Share your voice 1:58 Now playing: Watch this: Read more: 7 smart doorbells that make screening visitors oh-so easyRead also: Netgear adds a smart doorbell to its Arlo home security lineup I was taught as a child not to open the door to just anyone and I still think that’s a good rule. And now there’s a device that makes it easier than ever to keep strangers out. The smart doorbell concept is simple: Someone rings the bell or approaches your door and you get a push notification to your phone — which then shows you a live video of your front step. Some smart doorbells allow you to chat with your visitor through your phone and a speaker inside the buzzer. Some allow you to unlock your door from your phone. One of the most important features is the motion-activated camera, which can help guard against would-be porch pirates who could be after your deliveries.   Comments 17 Things to consider when choosing between brands (other than cost) include the live view resolution, the latency between doorbell and push notification and the two-way audio. You can check out our list of smart doorbells and their respective features here. CNET Asks 9 smart doorbells to try nowlast_img read more

first_imgBaltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, along with the Baltimore City School Board, introduced new CEO of the Baltimore Public Schools, Dr. Gregory Thornton, during a news conference Feb. 18 at John Eager Howard Elementary School. A life-long educator who once turned down an opportunity to study medicine free of charge because he was committed to becoming a teacher, Thornton comes to Baltimore after spending the last four years serving as superintendent of Milwaukee’s public schools. There, he helped raise graduation rates and improve student achievement scores at a rate higher than the national average, according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress Trial Urban District Assessment for 2013. In her introductory comments, Rawlings-Blake spoke of some of the challenges facing the Baltimore public schools and touted the 21st Century Buildings initiative, an effort to build new schools and renovate existing ones with the aid of $1.1 billion in funds secured by the Baltimore delegation to the Maryland legislature in Annapolis. “Our city school buildings” explained the mayor, “still are the oldest in the state. Many were built in the early part of the 20th century and some unfortunately…are still standing from the 19th century,” she said. “Leaking roofs,…unreliable heating and cooling systems, unusable bathrooms and water fountains had become the norm in too many of our schools and I can’t tell you what it means to me that future generations of Baltimore’s children—current and future—will see new schools, renovated schools, and first-class schools right here in Baltimore.” The sorry state of the school buildings was also attested to by Marcellis McQueen, a fourth grader and reporter for Cool School News, the John Eager Howard Elementary School newspaper. “Our water is always green or brown. Our bathroom, it’s dirty and is always getting flooded and needs improving,” Marcellis said. The young student reporter also noted that he would like to see better gym facilities and a student lounge where kids could receive additional help in subjects such as math. Thornton, whom the Mayor described as “a seasoned administrator” and “an outstanding partner in working to provide [the] world class education that we all want for Baltimore’s children” will take over for interim CEO Tisha Edwards, who oversaw the implementation of Common Core State Standards in the Baltimore public school system in July. In addition to continuing the implementation of Common Core, Thornton will be tasked with overseeing increased access to technology for Baltimore’s public school students, an effort he also helped oversee during his time in Milwaukee. According to Thornton, “On any given day, my kids [in the Milwaukee school system] are out on job sites, not as laborers, they are out basically looking at the role technology plays in every aspect of life.” The necessary tech infrastructure will be installed as part of the 21st Century Buildings initiative, but Thornton said he wants to work to increase access to technology beyond the walls of the schoolhouse for Baltimore’s public school students. “Kids gotta have access at home,” he said. “What I think premiere cities are trying to do is to create a way in which, no matter where you plug in, any time—kid’s laying in bed and can’t sleep, he takes his cell phone and gets caught up. That’s my goal.” In addition to being a life-long educator, Thornton is a grandfather and is accompanied in his move to Baltimore by his wife and fellow educator, Theresa Thornton, whom he has known since they were both 15 years old.last_img read more

first_imgWhen I first became a professional journalist with the AFRO back in 1989, the first story I ever wrote was about the Baltimore City Public Schools and the superintendent (that’s what they were called back then) at the time Richard Hunter. “Hunter Bombshell Still Seething,” was the headline of the front page story, which unpacked Hunter’s attempted re-organization of BCPS headquarters at North Avenue. That was January 1989, less than a year later, Hunter was out as superintendent.But, that’s beside the point.Sean Yoes (Courtesy Photo)A few months later after that first story, I was the AFRO’s full-time education reporter and I began producing a page titled, “AFRO School of the Week,” which focused a spotlight on the good works of schools in the BCPS.I suspect this would be a pretty good time to reinstitute the School of the Week page, and throw some shine on the gems within the beleaguered BCPS ($130 million deficit among other ills).I was recently introduced to a school which would be the perfect subject for a 2017 version of ASOTW, the Benjamin Banneker Eubie Blake Academy for Arts and Sciences, in East Baltimore.When I arrived at the all-boys middle school (it serves 6th-8th grade, however for this school year Banneker-Blake is 6th and 7th graders only) a couple of weeks ago (for an unrelated reason) I was welcomed by my friend, former Baltimore City Councilman Carl Stokes, who is a co-founder of the school. After I finished talking with Stokes, he introduced me to another co-founder of Banneker-Blake, Edwin Johnson, who proudly gave me a tour of the school, darting me from room to room where each time I entered a classroom, I was eagerly greeted by a dignified young man donned in coat and tie. I later found out those young men act as the classroom, “diplomats,” whose responsibility is to make visitors to that classroom feel welcome and to explain what’s going on without disrupting the lesson and the rest of the class.“There is a low expectation of Black kids, particularly Black males and it’s done systematically,” Edwin Johnson said. “A lot of our teachers in this system have low expectations,” he added.However, this charter school is setting the bar high for Black boys (despite the fact many of them come from some of the more impoverished neighborhoods of the city), offering “a rigorous science, technology, engineering and math curriculum.”Banneker-Blake’s school day is extended and they go to school year round, with three to four weeks of instruction during the summer.“For every decision, there is a decision…what you do in middle school, effects what you do in high school, which effects if you want to go to college,” said Thereas Farr, secretary of the school’s board members.“It’s not just what their learning, but how they apply what they learn…what they are teaching in the class and how it makes them understand that they have a say in society,” Farr said.Vaughn DeVaughn, who teaches social studies and geography at Banneker-Blake says the young men are making the transition from school being simply a place of social interaction, versus a thoughtful place with a higher purpose.“They are starting to make the connection that what I do here, will impact my life later on,” DeVaughn said. “It is a challenge..they are at that age where they just want to play and learning isn’t that important, they don’t see the bigger picture. So, for us as professors trying to instill in them that they are going to be something great…us trying to pull them in the right direction is a challenge, but they’re getting there,” he added.Akilah Sanchez, a language arts teacher from Harlem, New York, says her uncle helped prepare her for the reality of teaching Black boys in Baltimore, within a public school system many argue is not crafted for their success.“‘You don’t understand the impact of what you are about to do,’” her uncle warned, later telling his niece about the abysmal reading scores of many Black boys in the BCPS.  “When I got here my mantra, my motto has always been, failure is not an option, mediocrity is not a choice. So, when I got… to be a part of this (Banneker-Blake) mission, this vision I felt like, this is it, this is what your uncle had been telling you. And I said to myself, this is the beginning of your purpose,” Sanchez added.And the goal of Banneker-Blake is to imbue all of their young men with a sense of purpose.“We’re trying to teach them that every last one of them has a purpose and has a value to society,” Farr said. “That you can be whatever you want to be.”Sean Yoes is a senior contributor for the AFRO and host and executive producer of, AFRO First Edition, which airs Monday through Friday, 5 p.m.-7 p.m. on WEAA, 88.9.last_img read more

first_img CORAL SPRINGS Fla. – University of Louisville women’s golfers Olivia Cason, Lauren Hartlage, Delaney Shah, and Lauren Thibodeau were named Women’s Golf Coaches Association (WGCA) All-American Scholars, the organization announced Monday (July 8). Cason, who also earned the honor last season, graduated in the spring with a bachelor’s degree in finance. She wrapped up her Cardinal career ninth on the all-time scoring average list. Thibodeau earned the honor for the first time. The freshman was third on the team with a 74.91 average, which ranks fourth all-time by a freshman in program history. Her 5-under-par 67 during the first round of the Moon Golf Invitational was tied for the second lowest round of the season. Hartlage earns another accolade to add to the collection as she was recently named a Golfweek All-American Honorable Mention, All-ACC Academic Team, and All-ACC Women’s Golf Team. She led the Cardinals with a 72.60 stroke average, which ranks third all-time in program history. She finished her junior campaign 49th in the Golfstat NCAA Division I player rankings and 61st in the World Amateur Golf Ranking. She opened up the spring season by earning medalist honors at the Moon Golf Invitational for her second collegiate victory. Louisville has placed at least three on the list each year since 2012, and had multiple honorees each of the last 11 years. Shah and Hartlage have earned the honor all three years at UofL. For the third straight season the Cardinals led the Atlantic Coast Conference in total selections. The WGCA recognized 1,097 women’s collegiate golfers from Divisions I, II, and III with the prestigious honor for maintaining at least a 3.50 cumulative grade-point average and playing in at least 50% of the team’s rounds. For the latest on Louisville women’s golf, visit GoCards.com, or follow the team’s social media accounts on Twitter @UofLWGolf, Facebook /UofLWGolf, and Instagram @UofLWGolf. Print Friendly Version Story Links Shah ended the season with a 76.11 average, which included three rounds of par or better, and a pair of top-10 finishes.last_img read more

first_imgCredit: NASA (Phys.org)—Members of the International Astronomical Union have voted to approve a change to the definition of the famous “astronomical unit” aka, AU, from one based on variable data, to a definite number. The change has been a long time coming and will allow those in the field to describe their work more easily and will allow professors to forego the lengthy explanation of the prior definition to new students. New solar system formation models indicate that Jupiter’s foray robbed Mars of mass Citation: IAU votes to redefine the astronomical unit – giving it a constant value (2012, September 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-09-iau-votes-redefine-astronomical-constant.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img © 2012 Phys.org The AU is at its root a measure of the distance between the Earth and the sun; which was first calculated by the famous astronomer Giovanni Cassini who noted the position of Mars while standing in Paris and compared it to its angle in the sky when viewed from a site in South America at the same moment in time. Using parallax he was able to come up with a very close estimate of just how far the Earth was from Mars, and then the Earth from the sun, which he said should be about 140 million kilometers. That eerily accurate figure came to be used throughout astronomy as a standard for describing distances in the visible solar system. To make it more accurate, the calculation was changed in 1976 to include a tie to the sun’s mass, which for newcomers to the field only made things more difficult to understand. It also didn’t take into account the fact that the sun is gradually shrinking.Subsequent new developments in science and technology have led to much more precise ways to measure the distance between solar objects, which served to make using the old calculation even more obsolete. The only reason it’s lingered as long as it has, astronomers say, is because everyone was used to it and thought changing things might be too disruptive.That line of thinking apparently gave away to common sense at the latest meeting of the IAU, as members voted to make the AU an exact 149,597,870,700 meters, which is the average mean distance between the Earth and sun when viewed from the Earth. This last point is important because the old calculation violated Einstein’s Theory of Relativity in that using it should have given different answers depending on where the measurement was taken, i.e. from different objects in the solar system.Most in the field seem to be relieved to finally have the AU changed to a constant, believing it will help make their work more accurate and because it will, of course, require a lot less explaining to those new to astronomy. Explore furtherlast_img read more

first_imgTribal artisans from all over the country will present craft items, handloom products, dry flowers, cane and bamboo products, tribal jewellery, dhokra craft, tribal weaves and embroidery, tribal paintings and a lot more.The main objective of organising Adishilp is to give tribal artisans an opportunity to showcase and sell their traditional arts and crafts directly to the customers and get feedback which would provide valuable inputs. It provides them a platform for direct interface with art and craft lovers, share their talent with the urban elite and know the customers’ tastes and preferences to change their product designs and creations.WHEN: OngoingWHERE: Dilli Haatlast_img read more

first_imgSamsung has launched what it described as its “smartest TV ever” ahead of this week’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.The new QLED TV series – Q9, Q8, and Q7 – is designed to let users control “most connected TV devices” from a single source, with the Samsung Smart Remote.Viewers can also use their mobile device to select and start live TV programs and video-on-demand services using Samsung’s Smart View mobile app.“In 2017, Samsung is focused on the continued evolution of its much lauded Smart TV offering, giving people the simple, unified user experience they want for all their entertainment content,” said the company.Samsung claimed that the QLED TVs offer “dramatically improved colour performance” and are capable of reproducing “100% colour volume”.HyunSuk Kim unveils the new line“With the advent of QLED TV, we provide the most true-to-life picture on screen,” said HyunSuk Kim, president of the visual display business at Samsung Electronics.Other new design features include a single, transparent ‘invisible connection’ cable, through which all peripheral devices can be gathered and connected to the TV.The news comes after Samsung announced it would introduce new smart TV services at CES this week, including personalised Sports and Music offerings.last_img read more