first_img 12 smart doorbells to watch over your front stoop 13 Photos Smart Home Gadgets Video Cameras Security Tags These devices sound like they’d come in handy and would do a good job at deterring theft. What are some other reasons you’d use them? Maybe you don’t want to walk all the way to the front door just to find out your visitor was a solicitor. Maybe you have mobility issues. Or maybe you want to catch creeps like this guy. There’s a wide array of reasons and a wide array of smart doorbells to choose from.So we want to know: Do you own a smart doorbell already? Has it paid off? Have you caught a thief in the act? If so, please share! If not, do you find yourself wanting one? What features are you looking for? If you don’t want one, how come? Check out the poll below and cast your vote to answer these questions and more. If you’d like to explain your vote further, please join us in the comments.Check out previous installments of CNET Asks here, and cast your votes on a wide range of topics. If there is a particular question you’d like to see asked, or if you’d like a shot at being featured in a future edition, join us at CNET Member Asks and submit your topic idea.  Share your voice 1:58 Now playing: Watch this: Read more: 7 smart doorbells that make screening visitors oh-so easyRead also: Netgear adds a smart doorbell to its Arlo home security lineup I was taught as a child not to open the door to just anyone and I still think that’s a good rule. And now there’s a device that makes it easier than ever to keep strangers out. The smart doorbell concept is simple: Someone rings the bell or approaches your door and you get a push notification to your phone — which then shows you a live video of your front step. Some smart doorbells allow you to chat with your visitor through your phone and a speaker inside the buzzer. Some allow you to unlock your door from your phone. One of the most important features is the motion-activated camera, which can help guard against would-be porch pirates who could be after your deliveries.   Comments 17 Things to consider when choosing between brands (other than cost) include the live view resolution, the latency between doorbell and push notification and the two-way audio. You can check out our list of smart doorbells and their respective features here. CNET Asks 9 smart doorbells to try nowlast_img read more

first_img Explore further (Phys.org) —Researchers from the University of Kentucky have identified 14 molecular markers in bedbug genes commonly associated with resistance to pyrethroid, the most popular pesticide used to control them. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the team describes how they compared genes from pyrethroid resistant bedbugs found in the Los Angeles area, to those from other areas of the country that had not yet developed a resistance, and as a result were able to identify 14 gene markers, that are associated with resistance to the pesticide. Bedbugs have been in the news of late as outbreaks have occurred in cities throughout the world. They are parasites that feed on the blood of their hosts and leave behind itchy rashes. Efforts to eradicate them have become less effective as the pesticide most commonly used to kill them—pyrethroid—has become less lethal in some areas as the bugs develop resistance to it. In this new effort, the research team compared the genes of bedbugs found in the Los Angeles area that were known to have developed a resistance, with bedbug gene samples from 20 populations from other parts of the country that thus far, have not. In so doing, they found 14 markers, which they report, mostly involve the bugs’ outer shell, which serves as a barrier, preventing the toxin from reaching the inner body, allowing it to survive.The markers found by the researchers represent genes responsible for a variety of outer shell properties such as shell thickness, enzyme levels involved in metabolizing pyrethroid, etc. They also found that the markers represented two categories of defense, those responsible for neutralizing the pesticide before it could reach sensitive areas, and those that physically prevented the chemical from gaining entry to the body in the first place. Taken together, the markers represent a formidable line of defense that has evolved with bedbugs that helps them survive in a hostile environment.Because bedbugs are evolving in ways that make them resistant to current pesticides, researchers are looking for other ways to kill them—learning more about the ways they are evolving that help them survive doses of pyrethroid gives researchers a better picture of what is occurring, which will hopefully result in revealing an unknown vulnerability that could be exploited for use in a new kind of pesticide. Journal information: Scientific Reports More information: Bed bugs evolved unique adaptive strategy to resist pyrethroid insecticides, Scientific Reports 3, 1456, doi:10.1038/srep01456AbstractRecent advances in genomic and post-genomic technologies have facilitated a genome-wide analysis of the insecticide resistance-associated genes in insects. Through bed bug, Cimex lectularius transcriptome analysis, we identified 14 molecular markers associated with pyrethroid resistance. Our studies revealed that most of the resistance-associated genes functioning in diverse mechanisms are expressed in the epidermal layer of the integument, which could prevent or slow down the toxin from reaching the target sites on nerve cells, where an additional layer of resistance (kdr) is possible. This strategy evolved in bed bugs is based on their unique morphological, physiological and behavioral characteristics and has not been reported in any other insect species. RNA interference-aided knockdown of resistance associated genes showed the relative contribution of each mechanism towards overall resistance development. Understanding the complexity of adaptive strategies employed by bed bugs will help in designing the most effective and sustainable bed bug control methods. Citation: Researchers identify genes involved in bedbug pesticide resistance (2013, March 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-genes-involved-bedbug-pesticide-resistance.html © 2013 Phys.org Entomologists make important discovery regarding insecticide resistance in bed bugs This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

first_imgBeat the winter hair-related blues with interesting, do-it-yourself recipes using castor, coconut and jojoba oils, says an expert.Jojoba oil is indeed a blessing as it is rich in important vitamins and minerals. And guess what? It suits all skin types. It is light, non-sticky, odorless, and has a long shelf life. This amazing oil offers a plethora of benefits. Read on to know more.* Three-oil warm massage: Take equal portions of castor oil, extra virgin coconut oil and jojoba oil and mix them. Warm the oil mixture in a microwave for 30 seconds and add an egg yolk, mix all the ingredients well and massage the mixture on your hair length. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfCastor oil and extra virgin coconut oil help in replenishing dry and dull hair, whereas the egg yolk helps in improving the texture, leaving the tresses soft and shiny.*Banana voluminising mask: Even if you have fine hair, sometimes dryness can occur, specially in winter. To make sure that you hair look hydrated, mix one mashed banana with a few drops of jojoba oil and one eggwhite. Apply this mixture and keep it on for half an hour before rinsing it with warm water.* Oil massage and towel wrap: Simply apply jojoba oil on your hair whenever you know that your hair feels dry and rough in winters. Massage the oil into your hair, section by section starting from the scalp to the ends, pack in a warm towel for 15-20 minutes. Rinse, wash and condition as usual.last_img read more