first_imgShare this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedTarr, Robertson & Gordon Secure $30,000 In State Funding For Wilmington Senior Center ImprovementsIn “Government”OP-ED: Why Wilmington Residents Should Care About A Woburn 40B ProjectIn “Government”Massachusetts Lottery Eyeing Wilmington As Location For New Regional OfficeIn “Business” Dear Editor,We would like to take this opportunity to thank Senators Cindy Friedman and Bruce Tarr and Representatives Richard Haggerty, David Robertson, and Kenneth Gordon for their continued support in the Woburn Neighborhood Association’s objection to the Ledges Project. The State Delegation from Woburn and Wilmington sent a joint letter to the Mass Department of Environmental Protection outlining their objections to the project and asking them to take immediate action. The text of the letter is below.Sincerely,Michael L Raymond, ChairmanWoburn Neighborhood Association++++++++++++++++++++++Office of Heidi ZischGeneral CounselMass DEP 205B Lowell StWilmington, MA 01887Attorney Zisch,We write to you with great concern about the environmental impact regarding the “Ledges” project located at 1042 Main Street in Woburn, MA, and the widespread effects it will have on both the local and regional human and animal populations, forest ecosystem, and groundwater runoff. While we support accessible and affordable housing opportunities in the greater Boston area, the impact the proposed project has on the surrounding neighborhoods in terms of dust, noise, and construction on an environmentally damaged plot leads us to believe that such a project’s negatives far outweigh any perceived benefits. We believe that MassDEP would likely share in our and our constituents justified concerns,Firstly, with 420,000 cubic yards of soil set to be removed, the project not only radically alters the community but also exposes all residents to dust and debris as a result of the extensive blasting. Of particular concern to us is the great amount of Silica dust that will be created. As we are sure you know, silica contributes to increased risks of a myriad of cancers, a heightened risk of OCPD, and is the direct cause of silicosis. These risks are especially concerning due to the presence of young children and the elderly nearby, living in homes not typically insulated against such fine particle matter. Even if such particles do not enter the homes and business of residents, fine particles that land on cars, playsets, and pathways will be directly stirred up and breathed by thousands of people. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommends that workers who deal with silica change their clothes and park their vehicle in sheltered areas at the worksite, noting that fallen particles on clothes and cars still raise the level for illness. The residents of Woburn and Wilmington do not have this luxury, and instead are forced to be exposed to contaminates without any choice but to abandon their homes. This is egregious.Secondly, we wish MassDEP to address the radical changes such a development will have on the water percolation and runoff, especially with respect to the change in how the plume of the Olin Chemical site has continuously spread. As we are sure you are aware the chemicals leaked from the Olin Chemical property have created a larger plume than previously expected, With the removal of vegetation, top soil, and the creation of thousands of square feet of non-permeable surface we are concerned with the exacerbation that concentrated percolation and drainage will have in extending the plume. By creating non-permeable surfaces and removing topsoil storm-water run off potentially increase in concentration, pushing chemicals spreading through the bedroom even further rather than being held and released more slowly as the current topography of the site allows. As you are also aware, the Wilmington area cancer study is still an ongoing matter, and evidence suggests a correlation between the appearance of rare cancers and the chemicals present in the Woburn/Wilmington watershed.Thirdly, our delegation is concerned about the noise and light pollution on nearby residents. While the area is developed, the lowering of the elevation of the hill and the removal of the trees changes the dynamic of the light and noise pollution tremendously. It is no secret that studies show that exposure to light and sound during evening hours leads to higher rates of stress, depression, anxiety, and more in children. The size and scope of a project that radically alters the landscape will decrease the health of the population, decrease the values of existing property, and compound an already tenuous public health picture.As the project is moving forward, urgent action is greatly needed. We ask that you, within your powers, take into account our objections with the project so that the good people of Woburn and Wilmington do not lose their health, homes, or happiness. As always, if you have any questions on the above points, the project in general, or our other numerous concerns please do not hesitate to reach out to our respective offices.Sincerely,Representative David RobertsonRepresentative Richard HaggertyRepresentative Kenneth GordonSenator Bruce TarrSenator Cindy FriedmanLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.last_img read more

first_img Explore further The process involves mixing superparamagnetic manganese ferrite colloidal nanoparticles with individual molecules or monomers that make up the cellulose fibers in paper products or other nonwoven materials and getting them to connect, forming polymers, by submersion in a liquid solution. This process causes a thin shell to form around each fiber. The result is a solution that when applied to paper produces a final product that is both waterproof and magnetic. The team says they’ve also found that the amount of nanoparticles used in the process can be varied to adjust the degree of magnetism the paper will have.By adjusting the kinds of nanoparticles used in creating their solution, the team has found that the resultant paper can be made to demonstrate other properties as well. Using silver nanoparticles for example, allows for creating paper that is resistant to bacteria. Similarly, florescent paper can be made using other substances. There also exists the possibility of mixing up the ingredients to create paper that demonstrates several of the properties, or conceivably all of them at once.While the advantages of waterproof paper are obvious, the team notes that making paper magnetic could be useful for security applications such as when making bank notes or even currency. Also, paper that has antibacterial properties could be used in medical applications or food preparations, or perhaps with currency as well seeing as how many studies have shown that paper money carries all manner of bugs that can make people sick. Florescent paper could be used in security applications but also would likely have a lot of other uses such as in making posters that don’t require a black-light to create eerie effects, documents that could be read in the dark, or as a means of encoding data that only appears when the lights are turned out.The team points out that because the paper as a whole is not being coated, the paper produced from the process retains all of its normal properties. Thus, it can still be written or printed on with normal pens and printers. Also, they say, the solution they create can be applied to paper that already exists, allowing users to change the properties of already printed books, magazines, documents or virtually any other paper product. Citation: Research team uses nanoparticles to make paper waterproof and magnetic (2012, April 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-team-nanoparticles-paper-waterproof-magnetic.html Study improves understanding of method for creating multi-metal nanoparticles © 2012 Phys.Org More information: J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22, 1662-1666. DOI: 10.1039/C1JM14755B (Phys.org) — Researchers at the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Genoa, led by Roberto Cingolani, have devised a means for connecting cellulose fibers in ordinary paper with nanoparticles resulting in new desired properties, such as paper that is waterproof and magnetic, florescent or averse to bacteria. The team has published a paper describing their process in the Journal of Materials Chemistry. Journal information: Journal of Materials Chemistry This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more