first_imgParis Saint-Germain manager Thomas Tuchel has revealed he’s keen to buy players when the transfer window reopens in January.The former Borussia Dortmund boss is keen to see his midfield options strengthened after playing makeshift players in that position, as the French champions struggle with lack of options in the middle of the park.“That is very simple — I would like a second Marco or a second Marquinhos,” Tuchel said, according to ESPN.“However, first of all, we need to find this person. We want guys with good mentality, and that is hard to find.”Asked about goalkeeper Alphonse Areola’s decision to extend his contract with the French champions until 2023, Tuchel praised the France international.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“Alphonse is very important for us,” he said. “He has always said: ‘This is my club — I want to stay.’ It is really important to have guys like that — it is a strong signal.”Areola, who revealed Tuchel had played a major role in convincing him to commit his long-term future to Le Parisians, said he had not discussed Adrien Rabiot’s situation with his teammate.The French midfielder has been linked with a move away from Paris with Barcelona and Liverpool rumored to be interested in his services.“I have not really spoken with Adrien about it,” he said. “It is between him and the club, so it is not my business.”last_img read more

first_img Now playing: Watch this: Now playing: Watch this: Samsung Galaxy Fold: Delayed, available Septembergalaxy-galaxy-fold-8The Galaxy Fold. Angela Lang/CNET As the biggest tech company to throw its hat into the ring, many were eager to learn about the Galaxy Fold when Samsung introduced it at Unpacked in February. Pre-orders began in April and quickly sold out on the first day. Soon after, Samsung hit a snag when a handful of tech reporters documented screen issues like screen breakages, flickering and, bulging with their pre-production review units. Samsung kept pushing the delay from a couple of weeks to months, until it recently announced the Galaxy Fold would be available in September. (For more information, read CNET’s Galaxy Fold FAQ on the matter.)  The phone itself has a secondary 4.6-inch display that serves as its “cover,” with all the usual features you’d expect on a phone. When you’re ready for something bigger, the Fold opens up like a book to a 7.3-inch tablet. The Fold also has six cameras. On the back, there’s the same triple-camera setup as the Galaxy S10 and on the front a single 10-megapixel camera. In tablet form, there are two additional cameras inside: a selfie camera and an 8-megapixel depth camera.   Nubia Alpha wearable smartphone review Now playing: Watch this: Now playing: Watch this: Watch Samsung’s Galaxy Fold stress test 1:02 Motorola: Confirmedmoto-sidebysideImages from a design patent filed by Motorola in 2017. The filing went public in December. Photo illustration by Ian Knighton/CNET Ever since its patent application file went public in December 2017, rumors began circulating that Motorola, which Lenovo acquired in 2014, would resurrect the popular Motorola Razr phone with a folding-screen. Later, a company exec at Motorola confirmed something was coming down the pipeline, likely in the summer.The Razr reboot will supposedly cost $1,500 on Verizon  and leaked renders have leaked online. Refreshing the phone would be a smart move on Motorola. Since its original launch in 2004, the beloved phone has gained an iconic status for its sleek design, thin profile and various color options at the time.  Now playing: Watch this: Royole FlexPai: Available now019-royole-flexpai-phone-ces-2019The Royole Flexpai. Sarah Tew/CNET Developed by a startup headquartered in Fremont, California, the Royole Flexpai was the first flexible phone to debut, in October 2018. The phone has a plastic, 7.8-inch AMOLED screen and it’s already on sale. You’ll pay $1,318 (£1,209) for the 6GB of RAM and 128GB variant. And it’s $1,469 (£1,349) for the 8GB of RAM and 256GB version. (Australian prices weren’t released, but they convert to about AU$2,180 and AU$2,440, respectively.)The FlexPai runs an OS called Water that’s layered on top of Google Android 9.0. Whichever way you choose to hold or bend the device, the screen adjusts to its many different orientations and viewing options. Though rough around the edges when we first got our hands on it, the FlexPai gave us one of the first solid glimpses of what the future of foldable phones will hold. Apple Huawei Mate X is a foldable phone with 5G Now playing: Watch this: #Motorola – #Razr – New Motorola RAZR (2019) leaks out https://t.co/jxoTZuUC9N pic.twitter.com/h2Y0NyCS3q— /LEAKS (@Slashleaks) April 28, 2019 1:56 Will Apple jump on the foldable phone trend? 6:37 reading • Galaxy Fold relaunches in September, but it’s not the only foldable phone coming 2:43 45 Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Because of the phone’s novel design, it costs a pretty penny at $1,980 (about £1,500 or AU$2,800). The Fold has what the company calls an Infinity Flex Display, which is a fancy plastic material that can fold. After the reported screen issues, Samsung also reinforced the phone’s design to include things like protection caps for the hinges and additional metal layers.The Fold may also not be the only foldable phone from Samsung. The company is said to be developing two more foldable phones, according to Bloomberg. Citing people familiar with the company’s plans, Bloomberg reported that one phone will fold vertically, while the other will fold inward instead of outwardly like the Fold. With this Galaxy Fold snafu, however,, plans may change for Samsung.Huawei Mate X: Available Septemberhuawei-mate-x-hands-on-mwc-2019-36The Huawei Mate X. Andrew Hoyle/CNET Jumping on the trends of foldable phones and 5G, Huawei’s’s Mate X has both. It has a 6.6-inch display when folded closed and an 8-inch OLED screen when you flip it open. And it features 5G connectivity that’s said to be four times faster than 4G, a 4,500-mAh battery and three rear cameras.Huawei originally planned for the phone to launch in May, but it pushed the release to September. In addition, UK carriers Vodafone and EE said they were pulling the Mate X from their device lineups for their 5G network launches., so the exact fate of the phone is tenuous. Similar to the Fold, the Mate X is also be very pricey at 2,299 euros, or about $2,600, £2,000 or AU$3,660. However, at its MWC 2019 keynote back when Huawei first announced the phone, the company hinted that cheaper models may be coming down the pipeline.It’s unlikely that the Mate X will be available in the US when it launches mid-2019 though. Calling it a security threat to the Department of Defense, the US government banned the sale of Huawei phones on US military bases. Retail giant Best Buy stopped selling them in March 2018 and Huawei’s CFO was arrested in Canada at the request of the US in an act her father said was politically motivated. Huawei devices are still available in more than 170 countries around the world, however, according to a Huawei spokesperson.center_img Galaxy Fold gives foldable phones a black eye Share your voice Now playing: Watch this: Apple: Rumored, with patent applicationapplepatentflexiblephone.jpgAn updated patent by Apple shows various ways it could use a flexible or folding display. Apple/USPTO In February, Apple once again updated its patent application for a clamshell phone with a foldable display and body. The filings have been ongoing since Apple’s first one eight years ago, in 2011. Since then, rumors of a flexible iPhone reignite with every new updated document, which have been filed in 2014, 2016 and 2017.According to the filings, the phone “may have a flexible portion that allows the device to be folded.” But keeping with its usual style, Apple has remained mum on details. So far, nothing has come to fruition with any of these patents in the public eye, and there hasn’t been any info on what this device might be (and if it will even be a phone at all) or a timeline to expect such products. Mobile Tablets Phones Foldable Phones The Galaxy Fold. Angela Lang/CNET Three months after the Galaxy Fold was supposed to launch in April, Samsung confirmed on Wednesday that it fixed the phone’s screen problems and will relaunch the device in September with a slightly new look. But the company isn’t the only the one planning a foldable device. Other phone makers have either announced foldable phones or are rumored to have one in the works. Even despite this rather large blunder from Samsung, the tech industry still has foldable phones on the brain.Foldable phones are poised to transform the tech industry over the next five years, along with 5G. Any foldable phones we will see this year will just hint at what’s to come, as the devices become thinner, do a better job of managing battery life and let mobile apps take advantage of different display sizes. And all of this will develop with the help of Google too, as the company has committed to providing Android support for foldable designs. (Given some of its recent patent filings, it may even release a foldable phone of its own.)True, foldlabe phones are off to a shaky start, and we don’t know yet if Samsung’s relaunch is going to be enough to ease user concerns. But if all 11 companies below follow through with their plans, we are in for an interesting ride. Here are the brands that have announced plans, filed for a patent or are rumored to join the foldable craze. See All 1:54 Google: Prototyping, with patent applicationgoogle-patentGoogle’s patent application included several sketches of a potential foldable device. Google Back in December 2018, the tech giant filed a patent application for a foldable device. The patent is for a “foldable display of a computing device and includes a back stiffening layer, a transparent front-plate layer, a transparent cover window layer, and an OLED display layer disposed between the back stiffening layer and the transparent frontplate layer.” Fast forward later to May when  Google then confirmed that its been prototyping the technology, but didn’t see a clear use case for foldable screens yet. In addition, Google plans to support foldable phones with its Android OS platform to develop the technology from the software side as well.Lenovo’s CPlus concept phone. Jessica Dolcourt/CNET Lenovo: Rumored, with patent applicationAs mentioned before, Lenovo introduced the concept CPlus phone in 2016, which could bend and wrap around your wrist like the Nubia Alpha. While it was just a concept phone back then, Lenovo has been making inroads to release a real foldable phone to the masses. In July 2018 it filed a patent application for a “portable information device” with a “foldable configuration.”LG: Rumoredlg-v50-dual-screen-40The non-bending V50 with its non-bending second-screen attachment. Katie Collins/CNET Back in 2014, LG launched the G Flex, a phone with a curved screen. More recently at CES 2019, it showed off a rollable TV that will be on sale later this year. We know that LG has the technology in the works for a flexible phone and the company is said to be working on one.For now, we have no idea what the phone will look like, how much it will cost or when it will arrive. There were rumors that LG would introduce one at CES, but that turned out to be a false alarm. And later at MWC, LG had an accessory that added a second screen to its LG V50 phone, but unfortunately none of the devices fold.Originally published Jan. 26, 2019, 6:00 a.m. PT.Updates, July 28: Adds September availability of Galaxy Fold. Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Comments • Can Motorola’s Razr top Galaxy Fold by going smaller? 4:01 2:13 Royole FlexPai is a foldable phone you can actually buy Tags TCL: Confirmed, coming in 2020tcl-dragon-hinge-foldable-phone-dsc09339Several of TCL’s upcoming foldable devices. Shara Tibken/CNET Mostly known for its affordable televisions, Chinese tech company TCL is working on a number of foldable devices, which include two tablets, two phones and a cuff-like phone you wear around your wrist. Despite not being a household name in the US, you may know TCL better through other brands it owns, namely BlackBerry, Alcatel and Palm.The upcoming devices all have flexble AMOLED displays that can bend because of what TCL calls a DragonHinge. Patented by the company, the hinge enables the screens to fold both inward and outward. TCL estimates that its first foldable phone will be available in 2020 and that it could cost less than $1,000 — making it significantly cheaper than the Galaxy Fold.Xiaomi Dual Flex or Mix Flex. Xiaomi Xiaomi Dual Flex or Mix Flex: ConfirmedIn January, Chinese phone maker Xiaomi introduced its new foldable phone on the social media platform Weibo. Unlike previous phones we’ve seen, which have only one bend down the middle, Xiaomi’s phone folds down into thirds, with both sides folding down.Xiaomi co-founder and president Bin Lin said this form factor is “practical and beautiful” and that it “perfectly merges the experience of a tablet and a phone.” No specs or pricing information were given, but Xiaomi is currently taking votes on two possible names: Dual Flex or Mix Flex.Nubia Alpha: Available nownubia-alpha-mwc-2019-6The Nubia Alpha. Patrick Holland/CNET Nubia, an associate company of Chinese phone-maker ZTE, took the  concept of a foldable phone one step further with its Nubia Alpha. The $449 Alpha (£360 and AU$643, converted) is unique in that it’s a phone that wraps around a user’s wrist, similar to a smartwatch. It features a flexible 4.01-inch display, gesture controls and a water-resistant design. Its 5-megapixel camera can also record 10-second videos. However, it’s missing a lot of app support and it doesn’t have Instagram, Google Maps or an internet browser.This isn’t the first time we’ve seen a phone that looks like the Alpha. In 2016, Lenovo had a concept device called CPlus, which had a 4.26-inch display that you bent over your wrist. Unlike the CPlus, the Alpha is a real device you can get now. Xiaomi ZTE Google Huawei Lenovo LG Motorola Samsung Applelast_img read more

first_img“Some parliamentary constituencies are re-demarcated by the Election Commission ahead of every national election, which created controversies and cast adverse impacts on public mind. So, there’s no need for delimitation of constituencies (before next election),” the party said in one of their written proposals. The Election Commission on 24 August last started dialogues with 40 registered political parties to receive their opinions over the EC’s preparation for the 11th national election likely to be held in December 2018. Another proposal says, “The army will have to be kept deployed one month before the election to maintain peace and order. The army members will be engaged to provide security to voters and candidates on the election. And the army will have to be kept in the field to maintain peace and order till 15 days after the voting day.” A 14-member Bikalpadhara delegation, led by its chief and also former president AQM Badruddoza, placed a 13-point proposal participating in an EC dialogue held at Nirbachan Bhaban with chief election commissioner KM Nurul Huda in the chair. The dialogue began at 11am. The party, however, proposed deployment of army for 45 days from 30 days before the election and restoration ‘No Vote’ provision. AQM Badruddoza ChowdhuryBikalpadhara Bangladesh on Tuesday urged the Election Commission (EC) not to re-demarcate the parliamentary constituencies ahead of the next general election saying that it will invite controversies. Bikalpadhara secretary general major (Retd) Abdul Mannan was also among the delegation members.last_img read more

first_imgRead related Tribune coverage: The state’s attorney general tried to ease concerns Tuesday over whether a state-based immigration enforcement bill could be successfully challenged in courts.The Texas Senate State Affairs Committee voted 7-2 along party lines early Friday morning to advance a bill that would punish local government entities and college campuses that refuse to cooperate with federal immigration officials.This article originally appeared in The Texas Tribune at https://www.texastribune.org/2017/02/07/texas-senate-tentatively-approves-anti-sanctuary-city-legislation/.Texas Tribune mission statementThe Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues. Share Marjorie Kamys CoteraState Sen. Charles Perry, R-Lubbock, answers questions regarding Senate Bill 4, better known as the anti-“sanctuary cities” bill, on Feb. 7, 2017 in the state Capitol in Austin.Editor’s note: This story was updated on Wednesday, February 8, 2017, to reflect the Senate’s final vote on Senate Bill 4. The Republican-controlled Texas Senate gave its final stamp of approval on Wednesday to a bill that would gut funding from local and state entities that don’t enforce immigration laws. Senate Bill 4, filed by state Sen. Charles Perry, would punish local and state government entities and college campuses that refuse to cooperate with federal immigration officials or enforce immigration laws. Wednesday’s vote was 20-10 along party lines, with state Sen. José Rodríguez, D-El Paso, absent. Rodriguez was present a day earlier, when the Senate tentatively approved it on a 20-11 vote. The bill would also punish local governments if their law enforcement agencies fail to honor requests, known as detainers, from federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers to hand over immigrants in custody for possible deportation. Entities in violation would be stripped of state grant funding and also be subject to civil fines. Department heads could also be subject to criminal prosecution if they violate the provisions of the bill. The bill doesn’t apply to victims of or witnesses to crimes, public schools or hospital districts. The legislation was listed last month as one of Gov. Greg Abbott’s emergency items, which allows lawmakers to vote on the issue before the traditional 60-day waiting period to hear bills on the floor of either chamber. Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick also deemed the bill a legislative priority. The issue garnered national attention after Abbott made good on his promise this month to cut state funding for Travis County after that county’s sheriff, Sally Hernandez, enacted a policy that greatly rolls back her department’s cooperation with ICE. Wednesday’s vote followed an hours long debate on Tuesday where most of the amendments offered by Democrats were defeated. Like he did during a 16-hour committee hearing on the bill last week, Perry held his ground during the floor debate Tuesday, pushing back against accusations that his bill was a “deportation” bill after Democrats insisted the policy would cast a wide net and snare people in the country illegally but who are otherwise law abiding. Perry said it was about the rule of law and making sure every law enforcement agency follows the same procedures. He added that even if a person is in the country illegally, he or she would not have a reason to fear his legislation if they didn’t commit crimes. “This bill ensures that there is predictability that our laws are applied without prejudice” no matter who is in custody, he said. He also added that if a local government loses money because it adopted a “sanctuary” policy, the blame is on them. Perry amended his bill Tuesday to add tough civil and criminal penalties for entities that don’t comply with the bill’s provisions. One amendment would make a department head whose agency violates the provisions of SB 4 subject to criminal prosecution in the form of a class A misdemeanor. Another added a provision that would subject the local agency to civil penalties, including a fine at least $1,000 for the first offense and $25,000 for each subsequent violation. The severity of the proposals prompted state Sen. Sylvia Garcia, D-Houston to ask Perry how far he was willing to go. “What’s the next [amendment] going to do? Take their first born?” she asked. The upper chamber also predictably shot down by party line votes several amendments Democrats offered to make the bill more palatable to their constituents, including a measure by state Sen. Judith Zaffirini, D-Laredo, that would have excluded college campuses. An amendment by state Sen. José Menéndez, D-San Antonio, which sought to require peace officers to learn immigration law was also voted down, as was another by state Sen. Eddie Lucio, Jr. that would have prohibited the arrest of a person only because he or she was in the country illegally. Garcia also asked Perry to remove a section of the bill that would punish a local entity for “endorsing” a policy that prohibits or discourages enforcing immigration law. Garcia said that section could be a violation of an elected official’s right to free speech and could be interpreted broadly. Before the chamber began voting on the amendments, senators debated certain aspects of the bill for more than three hours. Republicans used the time to reiterate that the bill, as filed, would stand up to court challenges that might be brought over questions of constitutionality. That debate was preceded by a memo attorney general Ken Paxton sent Perry, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and State Affairs Committee Chair Joan Huffman, R-Houston, in which Paxton said concerns over the bill’s legal standing were overblown. “Our review of the law concludes CSSB 4 is constitutional, there are viable methods for covered entities to avoid liability regarding invalid detainers, and the remainder of the legal concerns are unfounded,” he said in the letter. “CSSB 4 would make great strides to keep communities secure by requiring state and local law enforcement to cooperate with federal agencies as they take care to faithfully execute the immigration laws of the United States.” During the debate, Perry also said that the measure would be the first-ever legislation to codify protections for victims of or witnesses to crimes that agree to cooperate with law enforcement. That came after Democratic lawmakers said that even though the protections are in place, the immigrant communities would still operate under a blanket of fear if they reached out to law enforcement for any reason, including reporting a crime. Perry said that the misinformation being pedaled about the bill might actually make it more difficult for police to get witnesses or victims to cooperate. But he said that left the door open for a “golden opportunity” for law enforcement to explain to the immigrant community what the bill actually does.  State Sen. John Whitmire, D-Houston, said that although lawmakers might be familiar with the nuances of the bill, the general public isn’t and law enforcement officers from across the state have said repeatedly that hinders their efforts to investigate crimes and keep the streets safe. “It may be a shame that people are afraid. But it doesn’t change the fact that people are afraid,” Whitmire said. “I am listening to the experts. It may be a shame they feel that way, but it’s absolutely true.” After Tuesday’s preliminary vote, Abbott praised SB 4 in a statement. “Today’s action in the Senate helps ensure that Sheriffs and officials across Texas comply with federal immigration laws and honor Immigration and Custom Enforcement detainer requests that keep dangerous criminals off of our streets,” the statement read in part. “I want to thank Senator Perry for his leadership on this issue and look forward to final passage in the Senate tomorrow.” The bill now heads to the Texas House, though whether the lower chamber accepts the bill as it’s currently presented isn’t clear. State Rep. Charlie Geren, R-Fort Worth, filed a companion bill to Perry’s original proposal, but the Texas House hasn’t yet named committees and isn’t moving as fast on this — or any other legislation — as the Senate is. last_img read more

first_img Share In July 1979, Tropical Storm Claudette caused significant flooding in southeast Texas. In Friendswood, Mike Babin’s house received 18 inches of water, forcing Babin to make serious renovations. During the process, he scrawled a note on some exposed sheetrock, wishing the future residents well in case the same misfortune fell upon them. He covered the note with a 1 x 6-inch piece of white pine, and forgot about it, until Jennifer Hunt (the current owner) found it while volunteers were mucking and gutting the house after it received 38 inches of water due to Harvey. Hunt and Babin met for the first time and shared stories.Full text of the note: “Mike Babin and his wife Donna and dog Munchkin were wiped out by Hurricane Claudette in July 1979, suffering 18 inches of water. They worked hard and long to restore this house. In the long future ahead, whoever may find this little note, best of wishes on the long hours you may find yourself trying to restore it. If you are anything like they are, you will find yourself goofing off and getting frustrated the rest of the time. To the best of interest, happy remodeling.”last_img read more