Tesla invests in Chinese subsidiary to build Gigafactory 3The Chinese Tesla factory in Shanghai announced this summer soon should move to the execution phase, as on September 7 Tesla increased the registered capital of Tesla (Shanghai) Co., Ltd. from 100 million yuan ($16.6 million) to 4.67 billion yuan ($680 million).That’s enough to start the work at the Tesla Gigafactory 3, which in total is expected to cost at least $2 billion. The facility will produce up to 500,000 cars (and battery packs) annually.See Also Tesla Opens World’s Largest Supercharger Station In Shanghai Source: finance.sina.com.cn Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla didn’t pick up a joint venture partner, so the hope is that China will not change its mind and let Tesla (and other foreign manufacturers) to produce and sell cars on its own. Thanks to this, Tesla will be able to completely control the entire production process without being subject to others, according to James Chao, IHS Asia Pacific Managing Director and Automotive Industry Analyst.It’s anticipated that the Chinese Gigafactory will produce Tesla Model Y (an affordable electric SUV).BREAKING $TSLA NEWS FROM CHINA.Things move fast when it comes to business in China.Tesla has changed registered capital of Chinese factory, from 100M Yuan to 4.67B Yuan(about 680M USD).— Richard Yi (@XZsSx1TE7oar9IF) September 9, 2018 Tesla Now Hiring For Factory In Shanghai UPDATE 2 – Tesla Announces New 500,000 Vehicle Factory Planned For China Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 10, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

first_imgThe European Nissan LEAF is produced in Sunderland, UKThe Nissan LEAF is the best-selling electric car of any kind in Europe this year, but that won’t necessarily be the case after 29 March 2019 at 11 p.m. when Brexit becomes fact.The European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) warns that without an agreement between the UK and the European Union, the general WTO rules will apply a 10% tariff to all cars traded between the EU and the UK. 10% would make a significant difference to the value proposition, especially when competition strengthens (new models).Erik Jonnaert, Secretary General of the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) said:“Some of our members are also planning a temporary post-Brexit production shutdown. But the harsh fact is that no amount of contingency planning can realistically cover all the gaps left by the UK’s withdrawal from the EU on WTO terms.”Under WTO rules, a 10% tariff would be applied to all cars traded between the EU and the UK. Jonnaert: “We cannot forget that profit margins in our industry are significantly lower than 10%. At the end of the day, these extra costs will either be passed on to the consumer or will have to be absorbed by the manufacturers.” Source: Electric Vehicle News See Also Nissan Sunderland PlantIn the worst case scenario, Nissan LEAF produced in the UK for countries in European Union will become 10% more expensive (at least if other factors do not absorb the tariff).We are not sure about any changes in the case of Norway (the Nissan LEAF’s biggest market in Europe) or Switzerland, which are outside of the EU (there could be no difference), but for sure LEAF’s business case in Europe is currently uncertain.This also might impact the arrival of the 60 kWh battery version model of the LEAF in Europe..embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }Press release:Brexit: auto industry urges negotiators to avert worst-case scenarioBrussels, 17 October 2018 – Ahead of this evening’s Brexit summit, Europe’s auto manufacturers and suppliers have come together to issue a stark warning on the potentially far-reaching impacts of a no-deal scenario on their sector, which would threaten their very business model.Automobile production plants – be they in the EU27 or the UK – receive and fit millions of parts into vehicles every day. All manufacturers rely on ‘just-in-time’ and ‘just-in-sequence’ delivery and production, without any delays or obstacles. These parts are in constant transit in trucks, arriving as and when they are needed.Every day 1,100 EU trucks cross the Channel to deliver to car and engine plants in the United Kingdom alone, for example. After Brexit, even short hold-ups at customs will cause massive logistical problems, disrupting the production process and generating significant costs.“Our members are already making contingency plans and are looking for warehouse spaces to stockpile parts,” stated Erik Jonnaert, Secretary General of the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA), which represents the 15 major Europe-based car, van, truck and bus manufacturers. “However, the space required to stockpile for more than a short time would be absolutely huge – and expensive.”“Some of our members are also planning a temporary post-Brexit production shutdown. But the harsh fact is that no amount of contingency planning can realistically cover all the gaps left by the UK’s withdrawal from the EU on WTO terms.”Under WTO rules, a 10% tariff would be applied to all cars traded between the EU and the UK. Jonnaert: “We cannot forget that profit margins in our industry are significantly lower than 10%. At the end of the day, these extra costs will either be passed on to the consumer or will have to be absorbed by the manufacturers.”“The clock is ticking, but it is not yet too late. That is why we are urging the negotiating teams on both sides to redouble their efforts to successfully conclude a withdrawal deal,” Jonnaert underlined.Sigrid de Vries, Secretary General, European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA): “Everything possible must be done to secure a future exchange of goods, services and people that is frictionless. Automotive components often cross borders several times before the final product reaches the customer, and that includes Channel crossings. Any change in the level of integration of the value chain will have an adverse effect on the competitiveness of individual companies and the sector as a whole.”“Smaller companies in particular, that constitute important building blocks of the supply chain, do not have the internal systems, IT platforms or staff in place to deal with customs declarations, tariff classification, customs valuation, or calculations based on content origin. SMEs will be forced to deal with at least some of these issues if they want to continue to trade and serve their customers, facing additional financial and logistical risks.”De Vries: “CLEPA recently surveyed its membership and the most important feedback to policy makers was: remove uncertainty. It remains crucially important to provide clarity on the future relation with the UK as quickly as possible, starting with a withdrawal agreement so that a cliff-edge scenario can be avoided.” Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 24, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newscenter_img 60-kWh Nissan LEAF Price Possibly Revealed In Dealer Documents Nissan LEAF Sales In Europe Exceed 4,500 In September 2018 In Europe Nissan Sells 1 LEAF Every 10 Minuteslast_img read more

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3 Range Down 42% In Cold Weather? Cold weather saps the range of electric cars, but what impact does it have if your car is just parked?The answer to that question is that it depends on the car and on just how cold it really is.  In this case, the car is a Tesla Model 3 and it’s parked for 10 days.More Cold Weather Info That’s not what we’d consider a very long time, but it’s surely enough to fully chill the battery. In a scenario such as this, it’s best to leave the EV plugged in, but that’s not always possible.So then, how much battery range will you lose if you park your Tesla Model 3 outside in the cold for a long period of time? Watch this video to find out. Included within are tips to minimize range loss when your Tesla is parked in the cold for a long period of time. It’s worth watching if you plan on experiencing the cold in your EV.Video description:How much did my Tesla Model 3 battery drain when I went on a 10-day trip without plugging my car in and parked it outside in the cold? How do I prepare my Model 3 for long term parking before I go away on trips? Tesla Model 3 Winter Test: Cold Weather Demands A Long-Range Battery Cold Weather Reveals A Tesla Advantage Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 7, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

first_img Tesla Slashes Model 3, S & X Pricing In China: Up To $51,000 Less Four-Digit Number Of Tesla Model 3s Arrive In Europe According to Teslarati, the automaker’s email to Mexico-based reservation holders informs them that the “Model 3, the wait is over.” These citizens — if they take delivery — will make history and set an all-new precedent for the struggling country.The particular Mexico City-Masaryk Tesla store is a bit of an outlier, as it’s situated in the very affluent neighborhood of Polanco. The area is well-known for top-dollar retail stores and upscale bistros. So, Tesla vehicles are sought-after as expected.As Teslarati shares, Tesla has been contacting a Model 3 reservation-holder by the name of Jose (as well as others) to get a grip on what configurations are needed in the area.Once again, Tesla proves that it’s branching out globally into a myriad of locales. While many naysayers will continue to assert that demand is limited and U.S. deliveries are lackluster, we can see where the Silicon Valley automaker’s newfound focus lies.Source: Teslarati Source: Electric Vehicle News Wow! The Tesla Model 3 is now making its way to Mexico of all markets.We already knew Tesla was pushing its hugely popular Model 3 midsize sedan to overseas markets, but to see it hit Mexico is a welcome surprise. Reportedly, the automaker sent invitations out for an open house in the country, as well as information about the electric car’s official launch. Today, Tesla will host the unveiling at its Mexico city store.Read also Over 1,600 Tesla Model 3 Roll Off Ship In China: Video Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 8, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News In addition, Autopilot was announced as standard across the Tesla lineup. The base Model 3 was reduced to an “off menu” style ordering that must be done over the phone or at a Tesla store. Leasing options were also provided for the newest Tesla. The full suite of changes can be found here.What Tesla failed to mention was that the Standard Range Plus was now open for ordering in several new markets in Europe and China. While details are still scarce, Chinese buyers are reporting an estimated delivery date in June.Europe has not shown delivery date for SR+.But China has, end of June for SR+! pic.twitter.com/w7EoY7GS13— Mars ☰mperor (@Mars__Emperor) April 12, 2019 TESLA MODEL 3 Tesla Model 3 Europe Deliveries Supported By Huge 300 Charger Hub UPDATE: Tesla Model 3 Imports To China Encounter A Customs Concern Tesla Announces Model 3 Leasing, Autopilot Now Standardcenter_img European Tesla fans have noted that the Model 3 Standard Range Plus is now available for ordering.Tesla unexpectedly delivered a lot of major news this evening, mostly centered around the Tesla Model 3. The electric automaker announced that deliveries of the Standard range model will begin as soon as this weekend.Tesla Model 3 Around the World 33 photos As expected, the Standard model is not an option through the website. Our assumption is that European and Chinese buyers will be able to order the base model in the same manner as in the United States – by calling or ordering from a Tesla store.Model 3 SR Plus now available in Norway too, at a VERY attractive NOK 367,700. This will sell like brown cheese and pølse med lompe!! @ValueAnalyst1 pic.twitter.com/pio3C1DLm4— Tesla Driver (@m_xalher) April 12, 2019 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 12, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

first_imgThe FCPA Flash podcast provides in an audio format the same fresh, candid, and informed commentary about the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and related topics as readers have come to expect from written posts on FCPA Professor.This FCPA Flash episode is a conversation with Jay Darden (Paul Hastings and former Assistant Chief of the DOJ’s Fraud Section). In the episode, Darden discusses what FCPA practitioners need to understand about being a DOJ FCPA attorney and along the same lines what DOJ FCPA enforcement attorneys need to understand about being an FCPA practitioner. Darden also provides a list of things he would change about the FCPA or FCPA enforcement and comments on recent FCPA enforcement actions concerning internship and hiring practices.FCPA Flash is sponsored by Kroll. Kroll is trusted by companies and compliance officers worldwide to help prevent, detect, and remediate FCPA challenges with scalable, end-to-end compliance solutions: from high-volume third party screening and automated monitoring, to risk-based due diligence, to complex investigations and monitorships.last_img read more

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first_img Source:https://news.uga.edu/migratory-animals-carry-more-parasites-says-study/ May 8 2018Every year, billions of animals migrate across the globe, carrying parasites with them and encountering parasites through their travels. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Georgia’s Odum School of Ecology discovered that animals known to migrate long distances are infected by a greater number of parasite species than animals that do not migrate.The researchers used parasite records from a database called the Global Mammal Parasite Database 2.0, and focused on ungulates, also known as hooved animals, a group that includes deer, wildebeests, caribou, antelope and gazelles.Claire Teitelbaum, a doctoral candidate at UGA, spearheaded the project in collaboration with former UGA doctoral student Shan Huang.”The most common reason we would expect that to happen is because migrants travel really far,” Teitelbaum said. “When they do so, they’re going to pick up more parasites as they go.”Migrants can also experience environments that better support parasite transmission year-round through their annual movement cycles.Teitelbaum grouped ungulate species based on whether they migrate seasonally, move unpredictably, or not at all. This allowed the team to compare the number of parasite species in nomadic, resident and migratory species.Previous research on parasites in migratory animals has focused mostly on birds and butterflies, so the team chose to focus on hooved animals instead.”We wanted to look at a slightly less well-represented group of mobile animals,” said Richard Hall, an assistant professor in the school of ecology who helped oversee the project. “We also wanted to compare across host and parasite species and see whether there were any general patterns.”The study’s findings can help researchers understand whether migrants are at greater risk from parasites, discover better ways to protect migrants whose populations are declining, and learn more about parasites living in cattle and other animals that are important food sources for people.Related StoriesScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CT”Sheep, cattle, goats, pigs, these are also hooved animals,” said Sonia Altizer, the UGA Athletic Association Professor of Ecology who also worked on the project. “Wild animals can share parasites and infectious diseases with their domesticated animal relatives, and if these migrants are moving around through diverse landscapes, it’s important that we understand how much they are exchanging parasites and infectious diseases with livestock and domesticated animals.”Hall and Altizer previously thought of migration as a way that animals avoid parasites.”We were expecting that fewer of these animals that move around more would be infected, because they leave behind habitats where they might pick up parasites, and because when animals are infected with parasites and try to fight off the infections while migrating, some of them die in the process.” Hall said. “What we found in this study was kind of the opposite in the hoofed animals.”Hall and Altizer helped put together the framework for the paper and develop the hypotheses that the team tested, and Altizer helped to build the Global Mammal Parasite Database, which pulls data from previous studies about parasites and their animal hosts.Still, the fact that migrants have more parasites does not mean they are sicker than non-migrants.”The number of parasites that they have doesn’t necessarily mean that they are suffering more from disease,” Teitelbaum said. “They could be infected by parasites that are less harmful. But from a conservation perspective, migratory animals are particularly in bad shape because of our actions and because of climate change. They require these big areas and we keep changing things.”last_img read more

first_imgMay 14 2018Very obese women should actually lose weight during pregnancy in order to have a healthy baby, contrary to current recommendations, according to a new study in the journal Heliyon. The researchers behind the study, from Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sud Réunion in France, say the current guidelines for weight gain in pregnancy should be adjusted for better outcomes in underweight and very obese women and their babies.The new study reveals the optimal weight gain for women that would give them a balanced risk of having a very small or very large baby. The findings will enable healthcare providers to give their patients more personalized recommendations. The team has developed an online calculator that can advise women on their ideal weight gain for the safest birth outcome, based on the research.”The results of our research provide a solution to the conundrum affecting the 135 million pregnancies per year on this planet,” said lead author Dr. Pierre-Yves Robillard. “Women want to know what their optimal weight gain should be to have their baby as safely as possible, and their maternity care providers want to know what advice they can give women throughout their pregnancy. While our results show the recommendations are fine for women in the normal weight range, we have shown they are not ideal for very underweight and very overweight women.”There is a strong link between the weight of mother and baby: very underweight mothers tend to have smaller babies – called small for gestational age (SGA) babies – and morbidly obese mothers tend to have more large for gestational age (LGA) babies. These babies are at higher risk of conditions like heart attacks, hypertension, obesity and diabetes as adults than babies born at normal weight.In order to ensure babies have the safest births and healthiest lives possible, there are guidelines recommending the ideal weight gain during pregnancy based on body mass index (BMI). These guidelines, set by the US Institute of Medicine in 2009, have been subject to some controversy: in countries where women are generally smaller, such as Japan and Korea, healthcare providers have suggested the weight gain at the lower end of the spectrum is not sufficient. With the increasing burden of obesity in many countries, it has been suggested that very obese women should in fact lose weight during pregnancy.Related StoriesData collected by ESHRE show rise in use of IVF in infertility treatmentMaternal obesity may negatively affect children’s lung developmentWomen’s pre-pregnancy obesity changes breast milk contents which can affect infant growthTo test these claims, Dr. Robillard and the team carried out a 16.5-year observational study. They recorded the pre-pregnancy BMI, weight gain, and weight of the baby of 52,092 women who gave birth at full term. The first finding was that only women with a normal BMI had a balanced risk of having an SGA or LGA baby (both 10 percent risk); they call this crossing point the Maternal Fetal Corpulence Symbiosis (MFCS).They then looked at how this MFCS shifted with BMI and weight gained during pregnancy. They pinpointed for each BMI category what the optimal weight gain should be for a balanced risk of having an SGA and LGA baby. This revealed that although the current recommendations are correct for women with a normal BMI, they are not correct for underweight or obese women.According to the study, a woman with a BMI of 17 should gain about 22kg instead of the recommended 12.5-18kg. An obese woman with a BMI of 32 should gain 3.6 kg instead of the recommended 5-9kg. And a very obese women with a BMI of 40 should actually lose 6kg.”We were surprised to find such a linear connection between BMI, weight gain and MFCS,” said Dr. Robillard. “The results will greatly facilitate an individualized approach when advising women about their optimal weight gain during pregnancy without having to put them into fixed categories – using the equation we uncovered, it’s possible to give specific advice based on the exact BMI of the woman.”The results have already led to an online calculator in which a woman can enter their height and weight to get a specific recommendation for her optimal weight gain, based on the research results. This could be developed into an app for women and their healthcare providers. Source: https://www.elsevier.com/about/press-releases/research-and-journals/very-obese-women-should-lose-weight-during-pregnancy-for-a-healthy-babylast_img read more

first_imgJun 7 2018Tonsil and adenoid removal associated with long-term risks of respiratory, allergic and infectious diseases Removing tonsils and adenoids in childhood increases the long-term risk of respiratory, allergic and infectious diseases, according to researchers who have examined – for the first time – the long-term effects of the operations.The researchers suggest renewed evaluation of alternatives to these common pediatric surgeries that include removal of tonsils (tonsillectomy) to treat chronic tonsillitis or adenoids (adenoidectomy) to treat recurrent middle ear infections.The adenoids and tonsils are strategically positioned in the nose and throat respectively to act as a first line of defense, helping to recognize airborne pathogens like bacteria and viruses, and begin the immune response to clear them from the body.The collaborative study initiated by the Copenhagen Evolutionary Medicine program looked at the long-term effects of removing the tonsils and adenoids in childhood, compared with children who had not undergone the surgeries.University of Melbourne researcher Dr Sean Byars and Professor Jacobus Boomsma from the University of Copenhagen led the research, with Professor Stephen Stearns from Yale University. The research is published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.The team analyzed a dataset from Denmark of 1,189,061 children born between 1979 and 1999, covering at least the first 10 years and up to 30 years of their life. Of the almost 1.2 million children, 17,460 had adenoidectomies, 11,830 tonsillectomy and 31, 377 had adenotonsillectomies, where both tonsils and adenoids removed. The children were otherwise healthy.”We calculated disease risks depending on whether adenoids, tonsils or both were removed in the first 9 years of life because this is when these tissues are most active in the developing immune system,” Dr Byars said.The analysis showed: Tonsillectomy was associated with an almost tripled relative risk – the risk for those who had the operation compared with those who didn’t – for diseases of the upper respiratory tract. These included asthma, influenza, pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder or COPD, the umbrella term for diseases such as chronic bronchitis and emphysema. The absolute risk (which takes into account how common these diseases are in the community) was also substantially increased at 18.61 percent. Adenoidectomy was found to be linked with a more than doubled relative risk of COPD and a nearly doubled relative risk of upper respiratory tract diseases and conjunctivitis. The absolute risk was also almost doubled for upper respiratory diseases but corresponded to a small increase for COPD, as this is a rarer condition in the community generally. Adenoidectomy was associated with a significantly reduced risk for sleep disorders and all surgeries were associated with significantly reduced risk for tonsillitis and chronic tonsillitis, as these organs were now removed. However, there was no change in abnormal breathing up to the age of 30 for any surgery and no change in sinusitis after tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy. Following adenotonsillectomy the relative risk for those who had the operation was found to increase four or five-fold for otitis media (inflammation of the middle ear) and sinusitis also showed a significant increase. Related StoriesNew mobile phone application can measure impaired breathingPuzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCMore than 936 million people have sleep apnea, ResMed-led analysis reveals”The association of tonsillectomy with respiratory disease later in life may therefore be considerable for those who have had the operation,” Prof Boomsma said.The team delved deeper into the statistics to reveal how many operations needed to be performed for a disease to occur at a greater rate than normal, known as the number needed to treat or NNT.”For tonsillectomy, we found that only five people needed to have the operation to cause an extra upper respiratory disease to appear in one of those people,” added Prof Boomsma.The team also analyzed conditions that these surgeries directly aimed to treat, and found mixed results:center_img The study suggests that shorter-term benefits of these surgeries may not continue up to the age of 30 apart from the reduced risk for tonsillitis (for all surgeries) and sleep disorders (for adenoidectomy).Instead, the longer-term risks for abnormal breathing, sinusitis and otitis media were either significantly higher after surgery or not significantly different.The researchers note that there will always be a need to remove tonsils and adenoids when those conditions are severe.”But our observed results that show increased risks for long-term diseases after surgery support delaying tonsil and adenoid removal if possible, which could aid normal immune system development in childhood and reduce these possible later-life disease risks, Dr Byars said.”As we uncover more about the function of immune tissues and the lifelong consequences of their removal, especially during sensitive ages when the body is developing, this will hopefully help guide treatment decisions for parents and doctors.” Source:https://www.unimelb.edu.au/last_img read more

first_imgAug 21 2018To fight viral infections, your immune system calls on CD8 T cells to kill the infected cells. The CD8 T cells can also be used in immunotherapy approaches to kill cancer cells, including the CAR T cell therapy currently attracting broad public attention.”The problem is that CD8 T cells are often exhausted in cancer and chronic infections like HIV, so they die off or stop functioning properly,” said Shomyseh Sanjabi, PhD, an assistant investigator at the Gladstone Institutes who has been studying this cell type for nearly 15 years. “I’ve been trying to better understand how these cells develop in order to find ways to help them regain their function and live longer.”When you initially get exposed to an invading pathogen, such as a virus, CD8 T cells begin to rapidly multiply. At this stage, they are called effector cells and act like foot soldiers, killing infected cells. Once the pathogen is gone, most effector cells die to ensure they don’t begin to attack your own body.The ones that survive become memory cells, which are more like specialized guards, patrolling your body for the same invaders for the rest of your life. The next time you get exposed to the same pathogen, these memory cells allow your body to respond much more quickly and protect you.In a new study published in the scientific journal PNAS, Sanjabi and her team identified two molecules, Sprouty 1 and Sprouty 2, that modify the survival of effector T cells and the development of memory CD8 T cells. Their findings offer promising potential for immunotherapeutic strategies to combat cancer and chronic infections.Better Without SproutyUsing animal models that Sanjabi has been developing for the past 10 years, the researchers in her laboratory deleted both Sprouty 1 and Sprouty 2 from CD8 T cells to see what would happen.They found that a larger than usual number of effector cells survive and become memory cells. The team also showed that the resulting memory cells, which lack the Sprouty molecules, actually have better protective capacity against a bacterial pathogen than regular memory cells.They also showed these same memory cells consume less glucose (sugar) as an energy source than normal CD8 T cells. While effector cells depend on glucose to live, memory cells generally use more fatty acids.Related StoriesStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumors”Tumor cells use a lot of glucose, so effector cells have difficulty surviving in the tumor environment because it doesn’t have a sufficient source of energy,” explained Hesham Shehata, PhD, former postdoctoral scholar in Sanjabi’s laboratory and first author of the study. “While memory cells generally don’t depend on glucose, our study suggests that effector cells without Sprouty 1 and 2 consume less glucose, so they could survive and function in a tumor environment much better.”Memory Is Good for ImmunotherapySanjabi’s study offers a new way to increase the number, survival, and function of memory CD8 T cells, which could provide better protection against tumors and pathogenic infections.”By shedding light on the role of Sprouty 1 and 2, our work revealed another layer of the underlying biology of T cells,” said Shehata. “Cells that lack Sprouty 1 and 2 have immense potential not only to fight tumors, but chronic viral infections as well. It’s exciting that our study can be applied to multiple contexts.”In the case of HIV, for instance, deleting the two Sprouty molecules could lead to memory cells that better survive and could effectively kill the activated cells harboring latent virus, one of the main barriers to a cure.As for cancer immunotherapy, recent studies have shown that approaches using memory cells can help reduce tumor sizes or even completely eliminate tumors, as compared to treatments using effector cells that have led to more patients relapsing.”There’s been great interest within the scientific community to enhance the development and function of memory CD8 T cells, which work better for immunotherapies than effector T cells,” said Sanjabi, who is also an associate professor of microbiology and immunology at UC San Francisco. “Our findings could provide an opportunity to improve future engineering of CAR T cells against tumors. This could potentially be used in combination with a genome editing technique like CRISPR that would remove the Sprouty 1 and 2 molecules from the cells to make them more effective.” Source:https://gladstone.org/about-us/press-releases/two-molecules-offer-great-potential-combat-cancer-and-chronic-infectionslast_img read more

(Science’s transition to a new website has led to the temporary, we hope, loss of some comments on past online stories. We are working to restore those comments. Meanwhile, the previously posted comments for the story are available in this document. We encourage the scientific community to leave additional comments on the full-length version of this story at the link below, rather than on this summary as the restoration of past comments may override any new ones here. We’re sorry for the inconvenience.)This week, a global network of nearly 100 psychologists unveiled the results of their attempt to repeat 27 well-known psychology studies. In more than half of the cases, the replication was a partial or complete failure. Some are heralding the replications as a renaissance for the social sciences. But some on the receiving end of the replication are calling it an inquisition.For the full story, see this week’s issue of Science. read more

first_imgHuman-produced noise in the ocean is likely harming marine mammals in numerous unknown ways, according to a comprehensive new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. That’s because there are insufficient data to determine how the ill effects of noise created by ships, sonar signals, and other activities interact with other threats, including pollution, climate change, and the loss of prey due to fishing. The report, which was sponsored by several government agencies and released on 7 October, provides a new framework for researchers to begin exploring these cumulative impacts.“There’s a growing recognition that interactions between stressors on marine mammals can’t right now be accurately assessed,” said Peter Tyack, a marine mammal biologist at the University of St Andrews in the United Kingdom, in a webinar on the report. Tyack also chaired the committee that prepared the study, “Approaches to Understanding the Cumulative Effects of Stressors on Marine Mammals.”Killer whales, for instance, are known to swim away from areas where they have encountered sonar signals of about 142 decibels, a sound level lower than currently allowed by the U.S. Navy for its ships, Tyack said, referring to a 2014 study in The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America that determined the mammals’ likely response. But scientists don’t yet know how other marine mammals might respond. They also don’t know whether or how other factors, such as encountering an oil spill or colliding with a ship, would—or would not—compound the cetaceans’ response to these sounds; or how or whether such combined stressors matter to the animals’ long-term health and overall population. Perhaps most surprising, Tyack said, scientists’ knowledge about the population size of most marine mammals “is very poor, and too weak to detect declines in time for effective action.”To begin filling in these many gaps, the scientists are calling on researchers to assess and report the health of individual marine mammals through observation, photography, tissue samples, analysis of waxy ear plugs, and tags that record data as the animals dive. Any changes, such as spotting skinny whales, might provide “early warning indicators” about possible population declines, Tyack said. Such data might have helped scientists figure out why an isolated population of Alaskan belugas, protected from hunting since 1999, has yet to recover.More information is also needed on the state of the oceans the animals live in and travel through, as well as the types of chemicals, temperature, and sounds they encounter. “We have to watch for larger, indirect effects,” Tyack said, noting that climate changes could reduce prey fish, and thus indirectly harm marine mammals—which might suffer additional stress if they’re traveling in an area of active oil exploration, for instance.As a first step, the report recommends “building affordable surveillance systems” to detect population changes, including reproductive rates, which can be a simple indicator of a species’ health. Adult female cetaceans, for instance, that aren’t reproducing or are abandoning their young may be a sign of bigger problems—something scientists need to recognize as an alert, Tyack said.The report calls on federal agencies and other research funders to support efforts to build the surveillance systems and develop case studies on the health of individual marine mammals and populations. Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

first_img SUBSCRIBE Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. 31 Black Women Who Died In Police Custody Ben Carson , Housing , HUD When also asked if he would live in one the trailers, he paused and said, “If I had to.”One comment on the YouTube video said it looked like a failed FEMA camp and another user wrote, “Tiny homes are not a solution, you still end up with a landlord which now are managed by corporations.”Carson was also asked about how he is enforcing a law to kick families out of public housing if one person lives in their home illegally, “Because it’s the law. We’re a nation of laws and if the lawmakers don’t like it, they need to change it.”HUD says 55,000 American children could be evicted, but Carson doesn’t care because he is selectively uses the excuse of the law.Speaking of the law, how about if Carson obeyed the law. According to Politico, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) has determined Carson broke the law by buying a $31,000 dining room set for his office and $8,000 dishwasher in the office kitchen. “Agencies are required to notify Congress of expenditures over $5,000 to furnish an executive’s office,” Politico wrote last month.Congress was reportedly not notified and Carson reportedly canceled the dining room set when the story broke early last year. No word about the dishwasher.Sen. Jack Reed (D-R.I.), the top Democrat on the Senate Appropriations subcommittee in charge of HUD, said in a statement that this apparent crime was “another example of the Trump administration trying to cast aside the law if it doesn’t suit them.” Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. More By NewsOne Staff USA, New York, Protesters of police killing march in New York demanding Justice For All Ben Carson‘s path of destruction as the unqualified secretary of Housing and Urban Development continues. His answer solving the housing crisis is to push everyone into a tiny trailer. This is not a joke.SEE ALSO: Maleah Davis’ Mother Confirms Her Husband Talked About Murder And Dumping A Body HUD officials have not commented on the decision from the GAO but supposedly HUD officials will set up a task force in the department to “improve its internal procedures.” HUD also instituted a mandatory review process “under which both its Office of Administration and Office of the Chief Financial Officer must approve all obligations or expenditures for covered purchases that affect any offices of any of HUD’s presidentially appointed officials,” according to the GAO.The New York Times reported on the dining set and its price tag in February 2018, just after HUD announced plans to slash funding for the homeless, elderly and poor, Carson and his wife went on a spending spree . “The purchase of the custom hardwood table, chairs and hutch came a month after a top agency staff member filed a whistle-blower complaint charging Mr. Carson’s wife, Candy Carson, with pressuring department officials to find money for the expensive redecoration of his offices, even if it meant circumventing the law,” the Times wrote at the time.More than $165,000 was spent buying lounge furniture for Carson’s office, the Guardian also reported at the time in exposing Carson’s press person, Raffi Williams, as a liar.Back in March of 2018,  CNN.com reported that Carson was offered a chance to repair the chairs that were once there for a cost of just $1,100. But Carson reportedly refused. “Carson referenced this concern in his statement released earlier this month. The furniture, he said, was ‘characterized as unsafe’ and was ‘beyond repair and needed to be replaced,’” CNN wrote. Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family HUD Official Helen Foster filed a lawsuit after she was allegedly demoted for refusing to approve the extravagant furniture.Watch the interview below:SEE ALSO:One Step Forward, 10 Steps Back: San Francisco’s First Black Woman Mayor Unseated By Rich White ManOutrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothes A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ In an interview with ABC News, Carson showcased tiny trailers that he wants to push people into. When questioned how this will solver the housing crisis, he simply answered, “Just by being much more affordable.”last_img read more

first_imgWhen the last Aztec Empress was born in the early 16th century to the Great Moctezuma II, all she had was her distinguished name. By the time she died at the age of 50, she had survived five husbands, mothered seven children, built a large estate and established a line of nobility that still endures today. At her birth, which came in either 1509 or 1510, she was named “Tecuichpotzin Ixcaxochitzin,” which means “Lord’s Daughter” in the Nahuatl language. Being that she was the daughter of Moctezuma and his principal wife Teotlalco, Tecuichpotzin was recognized as the legitimate heir to the house of her father.Moctezuma II, from the Codex Mendoza.First, she was married to the Aztec emperor Atlixcatzin, but he died shortly after, making her a widow at about 10 years of age. On November 8, 1519, the Spanish Hernán Cortés invaded Tenochtitlan and led the siege of Montezuma’s palace.Moctezuma’s Palace from the Codex Mendoza (1542).When Moctezuma was taken a hostage and killed, the Aztec people took Tecuichpotzin and married her to her uncle, Emperor Cuitláhuac.While the Aztecs managed to drive Cortés out of Tenochtitlan in June of 1520, the Spanish had brought the deadly smallpox disease with them. Cuitláhuac fell victim to the disease and died, leaving Tecuichpotzin a widow for the second time.Tenochtitlan. Photo by Mariana277 CC BY-SA 3.0Next, she was married to emperor Cuauhtémoc. In 1521, Cortés returned to Tenochtitlan in greater numbers. By that time, the Aztec population had been devastated by the smallpox epidemic. Emperor Cuauhtémoc was outmanned and forced to retreat by boat.However, Cortés and his army caught up with Cuauhtémoc and captured him. This officially ended the Spanish conquest but the bloodshed at the hands of the Spanish was not over. In 1525, Cuauhtémoc was executed by Cortés and Tecuichpotzin was widowed for the third time.Cortés and La Malinche meet Moctezuma in Tenochtitlan, November 8, 1519.But Cuauhtémoc had made a dying plea for Cortés to treat the women of his court with respect, especially his young wife, Tecuichpotzin. Cortés respected the wish and considered Tecuichpotzin the personification of what he hoped would be the melding of the Spanish and Aztec cultures.After being taught by the Spaniards about Christianity, Tecuichpotzin became a Catholic and was renamed “Doña Isabel.” In June 1526, she was married to a Spaniard, Alonso de Grado, and granted the most expensive “encomienda” in the Mexican Valley. Doña Isabel used her wealth to pay such generous alms to the Augustinians that she was asked to stop.Great Hollywood7 Things you may not know about The Mayans legends quotesWhen Alonso de Grado died, Cortés took the seventeen-year-old widow into his house. They were never married, so when Doña Isabel became pregnant, Cortés quickly wed her to Pedro Gallego de Andrade. But Doña Isabel did not acknowledge the child, and Cortés ended up caring for her himself.Modern reproduction of the Aztec feather headdress attributed to Moctezuma II exhibited at the Museo Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City. Photo by Thomas Ledl CC BY-SA 4.0Doña Isabel bore a son with her fifth husband and named him Andrade Gallego Moctezuma. Gallego died in 1532, and Doña Isabel married Juan Cano de Saavedra. He was her sixth and final husband. The union produced five children: Pedro, Gonzalo, Juan, Isabel, and Catalina Cano de Moctezuma.When Doña Isabel died, she willed that all her Indian slaves be freed and that all outstanding debts to her servants be paid. She also left one-fifth of her estate to the daughter whom she had born by Cortés.Genealogy of Tecuichpoch (Isabel Moctezuma). Photo by HJPD -CC BY-SA 3.0Doña Isabel willed the majority of her encomienda to her firstborn son, Juan de Andrade, and it endured for centuries after she was gone.Read another story from us :New Evidence on 5,600-yr-old Recipe Used for Embalming a BodyAll of her children became well-educated. Her two daughters became nuns at El Convento de la Conception de la Madre de Dios, and her sons founded the title of Duke of Moctezuma de Tultengo, which still exists today.last_img read more

first_img Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach On Thursday, The Indian Express had reported that the government had extended the tenure of Kashmir Divisional Commissioner Baseer Khan, who is among 19 revenue officials and hoteliers facing trial in the 2009 Gulmarg land scam before a special judge in Baramulla, was to retire on June 30.“Corrupt bureaucrats spreading terror through their pen is more dangerous than separatists and militants as far as national security and national interest is concerned. Because who knows? The money being earned by them through corrupt practices was possibly being used to fund anti national activities,” said Rakesh Gupta, President of the Jammu Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Top News Written by Arun Sharma | Jammu | Published: July 6, 2019 2:57:10 am Imran Khan welcomes ICJ verdict on Kulbhushan Jadhav, says will proceed further as per law LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? Advertising Jammu and Kashmir High Court. (File)A traders body in Jammu and Kashmir on Friday hit out at the government’s move to grant a one-year service extension to a senior bureaucrat who is an accused in a major land scam. On the other hand, a petition was also moved in the J&K High Court seeking cancellation of the Centre’s extension decision. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Twice as big as most research ships, the REV (seen in an artist’s concept) can operate in polar regions. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Norwegian billionaire funds deluxe deep ocean research ship It offers room for 60 researchers and large areas for science and engineering. It will have trawls for capturing marine life and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) for on-the-spot observations, a rare combination, and much else. “The idea that all the assets are on the ship, and you can pick and choose, that is tremendous,” says Ajit Subramaniam, a microbial oceanographer at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. The ROV, capable of 6000-meter descents, can be launched through large side doors or a moon pool in the hull. A pair of ship-borne helicopters can release smaller autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), which don’t need tethers to the main vessel. “Think of it as an aircraft carrier for robotics,” says Chris German, a marine geochemist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. The REV will also have a crewed submersible, probably one capable of descending 2000 meters.The main trawl, designed by Røkke’s company Aker BioMarine for harvesting krill in the Southern Ocean, can remain 3000 meters deep while funneling fish to a tube that quickly pumps them up to the ship’s wet labs. This offers the tantalizing possibility of collecting jellyfish and other soft organisms that normally don’t survive the slow trip to the surface when the trawl is winched up, opening a porthole into marine food webs. “If the gear can sample with less damage, this would really help,” says biological oceanographer Xabier Irigoien, science director of AZTI, a nonprofit institute for marine research in Pasaia, Spain.The REV could also make a significant contribution to understanding fisheries on the high seas, Irigoien adds. The intergovernmental organizations that regulate fishing beyond national jurisdictions don’t own ships and can rarely afford to pay for time. Free access to the REV could help scientists fill the gaps. They might be able to track tagged tuna or sharks with AUVs, for instance, while sizing up schools of fish with the ship’s high-tech sonar. By combining data from the trawl and sonar, Irigoien says, researchers could chart potential fisheries in the deep sea before they’re exploited. The same technologies would be useful for investigating far-flung marine protected areas. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) DATA: REV OCEAN; SCHMIDT OCEAN INSTITUTE; OCEAN EXPLORATION TRUST; OCEANX; VULCAN, INC. ESPEN ØINO INTERNATIONAL center_img By Erik StokstadNov. 19, 2018 , 12:00 PM “A dream vessel” is what Joana Xavier, a sponge expert at the Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental Research in Porto, Portugal, calls a new research ship due to launch in 2021. Funded by a Norwegian billionaire, the 183-meter-long Research Expedition Vessel (REV) will be the largest such ship ever built, more than twice the length of most rivals. Engineered to endure polar ice, punishing weather, and around-the-world voyages, the REV will not only be big and tough, but packed with top-of-the-line research gear—and luxurious accommodations. Its full capabilities were detailed for the first time last week at a meeting on deep-sea exploration at The Royal Society in London.The $350 million ship, under construction in a Black Sea shipyard in Romania, is owned by Kjell Inge Røkke, 60, who made his fortune in fishing, offshore oil, and other marine industries. In October, he promised an additional $150 million to REV Ocean in Fornebu, Norway, to operate the ship for at least 3 years, giving scientists free access. Røkke started the foundation last year to find solutions to climate change, ocean acidification, overfishing, and marine pollution. “The scale of the investment and commitment is astounding,” says Victor Zykov, science director of the Schmidt Ocean Institute, a charity in Palo Alto, California, that has its own research vessel, the Falkor.Many national research fleets are aging and shrinking. Since 2005, for example, the U.S. academic fleet has declined from 27 vessels to 18, and by 2025 it will it drop to 16 ships. As a result, marine scientists can face long waits for ship time. “If I want to know what’s happening in a particular place, it might not work out within a decade,” says Antje Boetius, an oceanographer and director of the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven, Germany. Philanthropists have launched several vessels to help shorten the queue, but few are dedicated to research, and all are dwarfed by the REV. Big boat, big science Private ships have helped compensate for declining access to government research vessels. Once complete, the Research Expedition Vessel (REV) will be the largest and best equipped. ShipMain purposeLength (m)Research berthsRange (km)BuiltRefitPatron ShipREVMain purposeResearchLength (m)181Research berths60Range (km)39,000Built2021RefitN/APatronKjell Inge Røkke ShipFalkorMain purposeTechnology developmentLength (m)83Research berths17Range (km)15,000Built1981Refit2012PatronEric & Wendy Schmidt ShipNautilusMain purposeExploration, educationLength (m)64Research berths31Range (km)24,000Built1967Refit2008PatronBob Ballard ShipAlucia2Main purposeExploration, mediaLength (m)87Research berths50Range (km)41,000Built2010Refit2019PatronRay Dalio ShipPetrelMain purposeWW II shipwrecksLength (m)76Research berths35Range (km)22,000Built2003Refit2017PatronPaul Allen Email Most research vessels are spartan, but on the REV scientists will have nearly full run of the ship, including its lounges, gym, dining room, and seven-story atrium. Magne Furuholmen, an artist and former keyboardist of 1980s pop group A-ha, is choosing the art collection. The REV is also eco-friendly: It’s fuel efficient with low emissions and a broad, stable hull designed to reduce noise pollution. If it encounters a garbage patch, booms can collect up to 5 tons a day of plastic to incinerate onboard for energy.Alex Rogers, an oceanographer at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, starts next month as the full-time science director for REV Ocean. He says scheduling an expedition on the REV could be quicker and more flexible than on government research vessels, which are sometimes limited by range, budget, or scientific focus. On the other hand, working with philanthropists is not like dealing with a research funding agency. “You have to explain what you’re doing,” Rogers says. “Be prepared to communicate with them.”Røkke’s history could raise concerns about hidden agendas. “I think there will always be some level of suspicion from the public that a person like Røkke—who made a fortune in ocean industries—that somehow there are strings attached,” Rogers admits. So he is working with the Research Council of Norway to design an independent review process that will select projects for ship time. Rogers says the only expectation is that researchers focus on solutions and share their data after they publish. “If Alex is involved, I have faith,” says Kerry Howell, a deep-sea ecologist at the University of Plymouth in the United Kingdom. “He’s not the kind of person who would work for the dark side.”As for Røkke, he has no plans to run the foundation and is “very meticulous about this being fully independent and objective,” says Nina Jensen, CEO of REV Ocean. “He is serious about making a difference for the oceans.” Jensen, who studied marine biology and previously led the environmental advocacy group WWF Norway , says she told Røkke she will resign if one of his companies, Aker BP, drills for oil in Norway’s Lofoten islands, which boast rich fisheries and the largest known deep-water coral reefs.To help cover the costs of operation, for 4 months a year the REV will open 60% of its berths on research expeditions to paying eco-tourists. For another 4 months, the entire ship will be available as a luxury yacht. Jensen hopes benefactors will charter it as a “floating think tank” to win more support for ocean protection. Any extra funds raised will go to support early-career scientists.It’s an unproven model, Jensen concedes, but the REV won’t sink or float on its fundraising prowess. Røkke’s pledge last month to support operations was only his first, Jensen says. “It will not be the last.”last_img read more

first_imgMedical device maker St. Jude Medical on Monday began deploying software designed to protect its remote monitoring system for implantable pacemaker and defibrillator devices.The move came on the heels of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s warning that the company’s Merlin@home Transmitter contained vulnerabilities that could be exploited by hackers.Merlin@home wirelessly communicates with implanted cardiac devices. It gathers data and sends it to a physician over the Merlin.net Patient Care Network via a continuous landline, cellular or Internet connection.An unauthorized user could exploit the vulnerabilities in Merlin@home to modify commands to an implanted device, which could result in rapid battery depletion or administration of inappropriate pacing or shocks, the FDA explained.There have been no reports of patient harm related to these cybersecurity vulnerabilities, the agency noted.last_img read more

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 9 2018For the first time, researchers at the UNC School of Medicine showed they could target one brain region with a weak alternating current of electricity, enhance the naturally occurring brain rhythms of that region, and significantly decrease symptoms associated with chronic lower back pain.The results, published in the Journal of Pain and presented at the Society for Neuroscience conference in San Diego this week, suggest that doctors could one day target parts of the brain with new noninvasive treatment strategies, such as transcranial alternating current stimulation, or tACS, which researchers used in this study to boost the naturally occurring brain waves they theorized were important for the treatment of chronic pain.”We’ve published numerous brain stimulation papers over several years, and we always learn something important,” said senior author Flavio Frohlich, PhD, director of the Carolina Center for Neurostimulation and associate professor of psychiatry. “But this is the first time we’ve studied chronic pain, and this is the only time all three elements of a study lined up perfectly. We successfully targeted a specific brain region, we enhanced or restored that region’s activity, and we correlated that enhancement with a significant decrease in symptoms.”Co-first author Julianna Prim, a graduate student mentored by Karen McCulloch, PT, PhD, in the Department of Allied Health Sciences at the UNC School of Medicine, who works closely with Frohlich’s lab, said, “If brain stimulation can help people with chronic pain, it would be a cheap, non-invasive therapy that could reduce the burden of opioids, which we all know can have severe side effects.”Chronic pain is the leading cause of disability in the world, but there is not consensus among scientists that brain activity plays a causal role in the condition. Frohlich says the pain research field has focused largely on peripheral causes of chronic pain. For example, if you have chronic lower back pain, then the cause and solution lie in the lower back and related parts of the nervous system in the spine. But some researchers and clinicians believe chronic pain runs deeper, that the condition can reorganize how cells in the nervous system communicate with each other, including networks of neurons in the brain. Over time, the theory goes, these networks get stuck in a kind of neural rut, essentially becoming a cause of chronic pain.Previous studies showed that people with chronic pain experience abnormal neural oscillations, or brain waves. There are several kinds of brain waves related to different brain regions and various kinds of brain activities – processing visual stimuli, memorization, creative thinking, etc. When we speak, think, eat, play sports, watch television, daydream, or sleep, our brain activity creates electrical patterns researchers can measure using electroencephalograms, or EEGs. These patterns fluctuate or oscillate, which is why they appear as waves that rise and fall on an EEG printout.One type of brain activity is called alpha oscillations, which occur when we are not taking in stimuli. When we meditate in silence, daydream in the shower, or even when we’re “in the zone” during athletic activity, alpha oscillations dominate the brain. Frohlich’s lab wanted to know if these alpha oscillations were deficient in the somatosensory cortex, located in the middle portion of the brain and likely involved in chronic pain. If so, then could Frohlich’s team enhance the alpha waves there? And if that were possible, would there be any pain relief?Related StoriesSleep quality and fatigue among women with premature ovarian insufficiencyResearchers measure EEG-based brain responses for non-speech and speech sounds in childrenWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskPrim and colleagues recruited 20 patients with lower chronic back pain. Each of them reported back pain as “four” or greater for at least six months on the subjective scale of one to 10. Each participant volunteered for two 40-minute sessions that took place one to three weeks apart.During all sessions, researchers attached an array of electrodes to the scalps of patients. During one session, researchers targeted the somatosensory cortex using tACS to enhance the naturally occurring alpha waves. During another session for all participants, researchers used a similar weak electrical current that was not targeted – this was a sham or placebo stimulation session. During all sessions, participants felt tingling on their scalp. They could not tell the difference between the sham and tACS sessions. Also, the researchers in charge of analyzing the data did not know when each participant underwent the sham or tACS sessions, making this study double-blinded.Co-first author Sangtae Ahn, PhD, a postdoc in Frohlich’s lab, analyzed the data, which showed that Frohlich’s team could indeed successfully target and enhance alpha oscillations in the somatosensory cortex of people with chronic lower back pain. When Prim and colleagues surveyed the participants, all of them reported a significant reduction in pain immediately following the tACS sessions, according to the subjective 0-10 pain scale. Remarkably, some participants reported feeling no pain after the tACS sessions. Participants did not report the same pain reduction after the sham stimulation sessions.”The exciting thing is that these results occurred after just one session,” Prim said. “We hope to conduct a larger study to discover the effects of multiple tACS sessions over a longer time period.”Frohlich said his lab also hopes to conduct studies on people with various kinds of chronic pain.”This study is a perfect example of what’s possible when scientists and clinicians collaborate,” he said. “Ultimately, if we want to develop better treatments, cures, and prevention strategies, then these sorts of new approaches that bring researchers together are of fundamental importance.”Frohlich is a member of the UNC Neuroscience Center. His main appointment is in psychiatry, but he holds joint appointments in the departments of biomedical engineering and cell biology & physiology at UNC-Chapel Hill.The National Institutes of Health and the North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences (NC TraCS) Institute funded this research.Transcranial alternating current stimulation is not electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), or shock therapy. The amount of electrical current used for tACS is about 1,000 times less than ECT. Source:http://news.unchealthcare.org/news/2018/november/can-stimulating-the-brain-treat-chronic-painlast_img read more

first_imgAll ZEISS segments and regions contributed to this outstanding result. Our innovative products for the semiconductor industry and medical technology in particular ensured significantly greater, above-market growth dynamics.With our consistent focus on innovations, investments, and expansion, we have our sights set squarely on our goal of achieving six billion in revenue.”Prof. Dr. Michael Kaschke, President & CEO of ZEISS Dec 19 2018Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)The ZEISS Group is continuing its growth trajectory: Revenue increased by nine percent to EUR 5.817 billion (previous year: EUR 5.348 billion).After currency adjustments, revenue rose by 12 percent. With earnings, it was possible to fully compensate for the unfavorable currency effects. Thus, at EUR 772 million, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) were slightly higher than the previous year (EUR 770 million).The EBIT margin was 13 percent. Incoming orders increased by seven percent, totaling EUR 6.046 billion. Source:https://www.zeiss.com/last_img read more