first_imgRashtrasant Tukadoji Maharaj Nagpur University Vice-Chancellor S.P. Kane has “indefinitely postponed” a programme involving a speech by Communist Party of India (Marxist) general secretary Sitaram Yechury allegedly due to pressure from right wing groups.Mr. Yechury was slated to deliver a speech on March 18 on “Democracy and its values,” organised by the Department of Ambedkar Thoughts of the university.The programme was “postponed” by the V-C two days before its scheduled date, attracting criticism from the organisers and writers and thinkers based in Nagpur who claimed that the V-C was forced to do so due to pressure from the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh’s student wing, the Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad.“We met the V-C and he told us that the programme has to be cancelled because of some unavoidable reasons. When I asked him about the reasons, he said some organisations called him and threatened to protest if Mr. Yechury speaks in the university. He did not name the organisation but it is clear that it was the ABVP,” Pradip Aglawe, head of Nagpur University’s Ambedkar Thoughts department, tolad The Hindu.No responseWhen asked, the V-C said, “The programme has not been cancelled. It has been postponed for some administrative purposes. I would not like to speak more on this issue.” Senior Congress leader Nitin Raut met the V-C along with a delegation of writers and thinkers on Thursday and asked him “not to act under pressure.”Mr. Raut said: “The V-C was under tremendous pressure when we met him. He was not in a position to explain us. He said there would be law and order issues if Mr. Yechury is invited. It was clearly the pressure from the ABVP. The V-C said he got calls asking him to not to go ahead with the programme. Mr. Yechury is not a terrorist or a traitor. He has been working as a parliamentarian for over 25 years now. He is known as an intellectual and to oppose his speech is absolutely unfair.”The ABVP, however, denied that it had anything to do with the “postponement” of the Communist leader’s programme.“We knew that he was going to come to Nagpur but we did not plan any protest against him which could have resulted in the cancellation of his programme. We can easily take the credit for this but the reality is that we have nothing to do with it. Had we been involved we would have openly done it and sent press notes to the media,” ABVP’s Nagpur area chief Gaurav Harde told The Hindu.Mr. Yechury did not respond to calls when contacted for his reaction.last_img read more

first_imgAs many as 415 infants and children died at the Baba Raghav Das (BRD) Medical College hospital in Gorakhpur in August this year, an increase of 51 deaths over the same month last year.As per hospital data, the hospital recorded 234 deaths in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and 181 in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). The NICU treats newborns while older children are treated in the PICU. Deaths due to Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) are included in the PICU.In August 2016, 364 children died in the hospital. Of these, 190 were recorded in the PICU and 174 in the NICU.The hospital had already recorded 386 deaths till August 29 this year. With 29 deaths on the last two days of the month, the figure reached 415.While figures for death percentage in the last two days could not be obtained, till August 29 it stood at 3.14% in the PICU and 7.20% in the NICU, with 171 and 215 deaths, respectively.While 1,000 patients were admitted in the PICU ward till August 29, another 480 were in the NICU section. Out of 171, around 73 died of AES.The death percentage at the PICU last August was 2.8% when 1,130 patients were admitted. In the NICU, 445 patients were admitted, of which 174 died at a percentage of 7.38%.The highest number of deaths recorded in a single day last year in the PICU and the NICU was 11 on August 9, 11 and 23.This year, the highest number of deaths recorded in a day in the PICU was 15 on August 28. The NICU section recorded the highest deaths at 15 on August 14, 14 on August 10 and 12 on August 20.However, the deaths due to AES last year in August, 104, were higher.According to BRD principal P.K.Singh, 34 children died in the NICU from August 26 to 29. While two died due to respiratory syndrome, one due to sepsis, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy claimed 10 lives and very low birth weight claimed 11 lives.In the PICU section, 41 deaths took place from August 26 to 29. Of these, 15 died of Acute Encephalitis Syndrome, 15 of sepsis, four died of snake bite or scorpion stings and three from pneumonia.August 28 also recorded the highest number of combined deaths in the PICU and the NICU this month with 25 casualties, followed by 24 on August 14 and 23 on August 10, when the oxygen supply was allegedly disrupted.Explaining the recent spurt in numbers, Mr. Singh on Wednesday said a large number of patients were coming to the hospital during the current monsoon period.The number of children admitted in the hospital on Wednesday was 344, Mr. Singh said. The BRD principal said, “Most of the children brought to the hospital are so critical, they can survive only for 30 minutes to one hour with the best possible management.”Mr. Singh said the hospital had “sufficient supply of medicine and oxygen”, adding that doctors were doing their job sincerely.However, he could not be reached over phone calls or messages on Thursday and Friday.last_img read more

first_imgPrime Minister Narendra Modi on Wednesday announced a defence industrial corridor in the Bundelkhand region to bring development in one of the most backward regions of Uttar Pradesh.“One of the two defence industrial corridors mentioned in the budget, one is proposed in the Bundelkhand region of the State, which will bring an investment of ₹20,000 crore and generate employment avenues for 2.5 lakh people,” the Prime Minister said at the Investors Summit-2018 here.Stressing that Uttar Pradesh government has a vast potential, the Prime Minister said that it requires policy, planning, performance to bring progress and both Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath and people of the state are ready to give “super hit” performance.Terming holding of investor’s summit in Uttar Pradesh and congregation of industrialists from all over as a sign of a big change, Mr. Modi said the Yogi Adityanath government has overcome the previous negativity and shown a ray of hope to people with positive changes.“Uttar Pradesh has values and virtues, but it also needs value addition,” Mr. Modi said lauding the new policy ‘One district one product’ of the Yogi government and said that it could prove to be the game changer for the State. The Prime Minister also said that international airports will come up in Jewar and Kushinagar.last_img read more

first_imgThe average temperatures from March to May across North India are likely to be above normal by more than one degree Celsius, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said in its seasonal forecast. The MeT office, in a statement, said average temperatures in Delhi, along with neighbouring states of Haryana, Punjab and Rajasthan, can soar over 1.5 degrees Celsius above normal levels. It projected maximum rise of more than 2.3 degrees higher than usual temperatures in hilly states of Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand. The temperature rise is likely to be moderate in south India and four north-eastern states. India normally experiences hot weather and heat wave conditions during March to July period.last_img read more

first_imgThe Shiromani Akali Dal on Friday demanded immediate dismissal of Punjab Local Bodies Minister Navjot Singh Sidhu from the Cabinet after the State government told the Supreme Court that the Punjab and Haryana High Court was correct in convicting Mr. Sidhu in a 1988 road rage case.“The presence of Mr. Sidhu in the Punjab Cabinet is not only untenable on moral grounds but is also a grave legal and constitutional absurdity,” an Akali leader said.last_img

first_imgA Kasuli court on May 4 ordered five-day police remand for Vijay Singh, who had allegedly shot dead a government official overseeing a demolition drive near Kasauli in Himachal Pradesh. Singh, who was nabbed by a joint team of Himachal and Delhi Police on May 3 from Vrindavan town of Mathura in Uttar Pradesh, was produced before the court of additional chief judicial magistrate in Kasauli on May 5. The police wanted the five-day custody to take the accused to the crime scene. “The court has remanded him [Vijay Singh] to five day police custody. We had sought his custody for further investigation of the case. Also, we have recovered the .32 bore revolver used in the crime,” police said. Shiv Kumar, officiating Superintendent of Police, Solan, said that the weapon used for committing the crime was hidden by the accused in the forest area near his guest house.last_img read more

first_imgThe Uttar Pradesh government on Tuesday gave its nod to yoga guru-turned-entrepreneur Baba Ramdev’s company to transfer land to its subsidiary for setting up a multi-crore mega food park in Noida.The ‘special exemption’ enjoyed by Patanjali Ayurveda Private Limited for setting up a mega food processing unit would also be given to its subsidiary, Patanjali Food and Herbal Park Noida Private Limited, government spokesperson Shrikant Sharma said.The Patanjali Food and Herbal Park would avail the special exemption of ‘sublease facility’ of land and a discount of 25% in the existing rate of land allotment.With this, the government has cleared the way for the Patanjali group’s 455-acre food park proposed to come up near Greater Noida under the Yamuna Expressway Industrial Development Authority.The decision was taken at a Cabinet meeting chaired by Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath. The move comes weeks after Patanjali Ayurveda had threatened to shift the project out of U.P. citing the non-cooperative approach of the State government.SP approvalThe Samajwadi Party government had in November 2016 approved the project. However, the permission to shift the land to the Patanjali’s subsidiary was withheld as existing laws did not allow sub-leasing.Faced with a deadline issued by the Centre regarding its land acquisition, the company had in early June claimed it was planning to shift the proposed food park elsewhere.last_img read more

first_imgA Cabinet Minister in the BJP government in Uttar Pradesh has courted controversy by claiming on camera that a Ram temple would be constructed in Ayodhya as the “Supreme Court is ours.”Interacting with journalists at Bahraich on Saturday, Mukut Bihari Verma expressed confidence that the temple would be built at the disputed site as the judiciary, as well as the executive and the legislature, was “ours.” But the MLA from Kaiserganj, who holds the cooperative portfolio in the Yogi Adityanath government, did not specify what he meant by “ours.” He made the remarks when asked by journalists about the BJP’s long-standing promise of building a Ram temple. While the “BJP came [to power] on the issue of development, the Ram Mandir is its revered goal.” “The temple will be constructed. We are deeply committed to building the temple,” he said.When reporters pushed him to explain how the BJP had resolved to construct the temple as the matter was sub judice in the apex court, Mr. Verma responded with the controversial remarks. “Supreme court mein hai, tabhi toh. Supreme Court bhi toh hamara hai na. Nyaypalika bhi. Karya palika bhi hamari hai, vidhan palika bhi. Desh bhi hamara hai, mandir bhi hamara hai (The matter is in the Supreme Court, that’s why. The SC is ours, the judiciary is ours…the executive is also ours, and the legislature is also ours. The country is ours, the temple is also ours,” Mr. Verma said.He was not available for clarification.last_img read more

first_imgNational Conference president Farooq Abdullah on Sunday said the BJP was creating a fear psychosis across the country “by crying hoarse over the nation being in danger”.“India is not in danger, it is the BJP that is in danger due to rug slipping from under the feet of the Prime Minister ahead of general election,” said Dr. Abdullah in his public address in Jammu. He said the politics of hate and mistrust was being perpetrated and practised by the BJP. “This is against the very idea of India. Instead of dividing the people in the name of religion, caste and region, everyone should be treated as a compatriot, which alone can lead the country to progress and harmony,” he added.Referring to air strikes, Dr. Abdullah said: “It was a selective outrage. Similar concern and anguish should have been demonstrated over the killing of security forces in Maoist violence in Chhattisgarh and elsewhere. Nobody from the Centre even visited those martyrs.”He said Mr. Modi used to censure the Centre as the Chief Minister of Gujarat on the rising prices and growing unemployment, “but now he has no answers or explanations to offer to the people”.last_img read more

first_imgGiven the right instructions in the lab, mature cells can turn back into embryoniclike ones that researchers covet, but the process is frustratingly slow and inefficient. By removing a molecular brake, scientists have now figured out how to reprogram cells with almost 100% efficiency.In a process called cellular reprogramming, researchers increase the expression of four genes in skin, blood, or other mature cells to turn them into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which can become any of the body’s cell types. Scientists value the method because it allows them to make patient-specific cells in the lab that they can use to study disease—and perhaps someday to treat patients. However, the reprogramming procedure is hit-and-miss. The most efficient methods reprogram only about 10% of mature cells into iPSCs.Now, stem cell researcher Jacob Hanna and his colleagues at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, have identified a protein that acts as a brake on reprogramming. When the protein, called Mbd3, is removed—either by mutating its gene or by slashing its expression—the four reprogramming genes can turn nearly 100% of cells into iPSCs within a week, Hanna and his colleagues report online today in Nature.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The group also found that the Mbd3 gene forms a feedback loop with the four reprogramming genes. When they are active, they switch on production of the Mbd3 protein, which in turn inhibits their further expression. During development, Hanna says, the protein likely helps coordinate when cells begin to differentiate.To better study the protein, the researchers made genetically altered cells in which expression of Mbd3 can be turned off and on. They found that when Mbd3 is removed, the cells respond to the reprogramming genes with surprising synchrony as they revert to an embryoniclike state. Usually it takes weeks or even months to reprogram a handful of cells, and there’s no way to predict which cells will “take” and which won’t. But the genetically altered cells went through the process at the same time, and virtually all of them were reprogrammed in a week, the researchers found. “It’s unexpected that the depletion of a single [protein] can have such a dramatic effect,” says Konrad Hochedlinger, who studies reprogramming and pluripotent stem cells at Harvard Medical School in Boston. He wonders if there might be other molecular brakes that, when removed, have similar effects. The interactions between Mbd3 and the reprogramming genes help explain why reprogramming has been such an unpredictable process, Hanna says. Only in rare cells can the reprogramming genes overcome the resistance that Mbd3 provides.The ability to study entire populations of synchronized cells as they are reprogrammed should allow scientists to better understand the molecular events that drive the mature cells back to an immature state, Hochedlinger says. It might also allow researchers to isolate and study partially reprogrammed cells. “They might be therapeutically interesting,” Hochedlinger says, because they would be able to grow into useful tissue types without seeding tumors, which fully reprogrammed cells can do.It won’t be easy to use the technique to make patient-specific iPSCs, however. The genetic modifications that Hanna and his colleagues introduced might interfere with the cells’ later behavior in unpredictable ways. Hanna says that he and his colleagues are looking for a small molecule that could block Mbd3 temporarily, removing the brake just long enough to allow cells to be reprogrammed.last_img read more

first_imgA rose, a fresh cup of coffee, a wood fire. These are only three of the roughly 1 trillion scents that the human nose and brain are capable of distinguishing from each other, according to a new study. Researchers had previously estimated that humans could sense only about 10,000 odors but the number had never been explicitly tested before.“People have been talked into this idea that humans are bad at detecting smells,” says neurobiologist Leslie Vosshall of Rockefeller University in New York City, who led the new work. “So these findings should give the whole human race a confidence boost.”Humans detect smells by inhaling air that contains odor molecules, which then bind to receptors inside the nose, relaying messages to the brain. Most scents are composed of many odorants; a whiff of chocolate, for example, is made up of hundreds of different odor molecules. Understanding how people process the complex information contained in scents—or memories of smells—offers a window into how the human brain functions.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Vosshall says she and others in the field had long guessed that the number of detectable scents often cited in the literature, based on rough calculations made in the 1920s of the known groups and ranges of smells—claiming that humans could distinguish 10,000 odors—was way off. So her lab decided to test it once and for all. They took 128 odor molecules that represented a wide range of smells and started combining them into unique mixtures containing 10, 20, or 30 different components. Then, they recruited volunteers from the community, aged 20 to 48, to start sniffing the mixtures. “The people we invited to do this study were not professionals; they were not wine tasters or perfumers,” Vosshall says.Each volunteer was given three smell-containing vials at a time—two that were identical and one that was a slightly different mixture—and then was asked which was the odd one out. On average, if the components varied by more than 50%, the scientists found, people could distinguish the smells as different. When Vosshall’s team crunched these numbers, extrapolating how many different combinations of the 128 odorants an average person could differentiate, they arrived at an average of 1 trillion smells.Individual performance, however, varied, they report online today in Science. The researchers calculated that the least successful smeller in the study would be able to smell only 80 million unique scents. And the best performer had a far more sensitive sense of smell, likely able to distinguish more than a thousand trillion odors.The ability to distinguish a trillion scents from one another when they’re paired up, though, doesn’t mean that humans can identify a trillion different scents, says neurologist Jay Gottfried of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. “Even if humans can distinguish that many odors based on these projected mixtures, I don’t know if there are really 1 trillion unique odors in the world that we would need to be discriminating.”Gottfried adds, however, that the study brings up interesting questions regarding how complex smells are sensed by the nose and brain. “In general, it highlights a growing interest in how combinations of odors—rather than single odor molecules at a time—are sensed and processed.”Vosshall and her colleagues are pursuing some of these questions, including whether certain combinations of odors are indistinguishable despite being very different at a molecular level. But for now, she just hopes the new findings encourage people to take another sniff at the world around them.“Knowing we have these capabilities, I hope people, as they go about their business, start saying, ‘Hey, I can smell all these things.’ Maybe the companies that make scented products will start making greater use of the human capacity and develop cleaners and perfumes with new, more interesting scents,” she says. “Maybe we’re going to start using those corners of our smell capacity that have just not been exercised lately.”last_img read more

first_imgThe mineral that makes up more than a third of our planet finally has a name, thanks to tiny samples found, ironically, in a meteorite that fell to Earth in Australia in 1879. Under the rules of the International Mineralogical Association, scientists can name a mineral (a solid material with a distinct chemical composition and crystalline structure) only once they’ve analyzed a natural sample. But because the newly named mineral typically is stable only at pressures found more than 660 kilometers below Earth’s surface, natural versions of the mineral remained stubbornly out of reach. So scientists looked for another source of incredibly high pressures: collisions between asteroids in space, such as the one that created the Australian meteorite hundreds of millions of years ago. Analyzing a slice of the meteorite (see image above), researchers discovered that the crash briefly subjected the rock to hellish temperatures of about 2100°C and pressures about 240,000 times sea-level air pressure, they report online today in Science. In dark veins within the once-shattered sample, the researchers also found tiny 20- to 30-micrometer-wide blobs of the mineral. The frigid cold of space locked the mineral’s atoms in place, and slightly elevated pressures due to stresses inside the meteorite also helped preserve its crystalline structure. The mineral is a silicate in the perovskite family. The mineral’s new name, bridgmanite, honors 1946 Nobel Prize winner Percy Bridgman, a physicist who pioneered the analyses of minerals and other materials under high pressure. Previous estimates suggest that 70% of Earth’s lower mantle—which falls between depths of 660 and 2900 kilometers—is bridgmanite, the researchers say. That means the new mineral accounts for a whopping 38% of Earth’s entire volume.*Correction, 30 November, 6:55 a.m.: The story was changed to include information about the family to which the mineral belongs.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

first_imgA tiny particle of metal dust is delaying the restart of the world’s largest particle accelerator. Physicists at the European particle physics lab CERN on the French-Swiss border had hoped to begin circulating particles in Large Hadron Collider (LHC) this week, after 2 years of downtime to prepare the machine to run at higher energy. But an electrical short discovered over the weekend, apparently caused by a metal particle, has put a snag in those plans. Rectifying the issue could cause a delay of a few days to a few weeks, CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer told ScienceInsider today at an event in Washington, D.C.”It’s unfortunate, it’s at the end, almost when we are ready to inject beam, but this is part of the process” says CERN’s director for accelerators, Frédérick Bordry.Electrical shorts are not uncommon during the process of ramping up the LHC, but because the machine is already cooled down to its very low operating temperature, fixing the problem is now more difficult. If the machine must be warmed up to fix the problem, the work could drag out for weeks.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Luckily, Bordry says, the problem is not with any of the LHCs magnets, so they won’t need to remove a magnet, just “this bloody piece of metal.” Scientists think they may be able to solve the problem by burning the metal off, or by blowing away the metal fragment with gaseous helium.Tomorrow, CERN scientists plan to use x-ray imaging to better understand the issue. More specifics on the schedule will be available then.Heuer is confident that the delay will be minor. And after 2 years without a particle beam, a delay of a few weeks is worth waiting for, he says. Once they inject the beam, it will be another 2 months before they will be ready for the first collisions.”We are not concerned,” Heuer says. “If that’s all that happens then we are very happy.”last_img read more

first_imgCompanies from the UK want to invest more in India and would like to see some liberalisation around insurance, food retailing on pan state basis which will allow them to benefit more, said Richard Heald, CEO, United Kingdom-India Business Council (UKIBC). Read it at CNBC Related Itemslast_img

first_imgAs India gears up for general elections, owners of global social media platforms are in a huddle over how to curb the spread of misinformation and fake news in a country where deep mobile penetration has made Facebook, its messaging service WhatsApp and Twitter available at the fingertips of millions.Read it at Khaleej Times Related Itemslast_img